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Water Resources Programme - Monitoring Programme Data. Introduction WISER is a self-service platform for data of the Global Networks of Isotopes in Precipitation (GNIP) and Rivers (GNIR), hosted within the IAEA's repository for technical resources (NUCLEUS).

Water Resources Programme - Monitoring Programme Data

Log-in WISER is accessible to registered NUCLEUS users. It uses the NUCLEUS-Single-Sign-On (SSO) concept, which allows using the same log-in credentials (username and password), for a number of NUCLEUS applications. When accessing WISER through the URL you will be forwarded to the NUCLEUS log-in page. NUCLEUS accounts are administrated by IAEA IT Service Desk; a help page for these accounts is available at Menu and data structure WISER features three main data services: • GNIP data: Data from monthly and event-based precipitation observations, and a few water vapour collection sites. Global Networks of Isotopes in Precipitation and Rivers (GNIP, GNIR) Catalogue Image.

Global Networks of Isotopes in Precipitation and Rivers (GNIP, GNIR)

An Error Occurred Setting Your User Cookie. An Error Occurred Setting Your User Cookie. Mapping oxygen stable isotopes of precipitation in Italy. <div class="msgBox" style="margin-top:10px;"><span class="errMsg"><div>JavaScript is disabled on your browser.

Mapping oxygen stable isotopes of precipitation in Italy

Please enable JavaScript to use all the features on this page. This page uses JavaScript to progressively load the article content as a user scrolls. Click the View full text link to bypass dynamically loaded article content. <a rel="nofollow" href=" full text</a></div></span></div><br /> a Istituto di Geologia Ambientale e Geoingegneria, CNR, Area della Ricerca di Roma1, Via Salaria Km 29, 300, 00015 Monterotondo Staz., Rome, Italyb Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Via di Vigna Murata 605, 00143 Rome, Italy Received 1 October 2015, Revised 1 April 2016, Accepted 2 April 2016, Available online 17 October 2016 Get rights and content Highlights.

Spatial analysis of hydrogen and oxygen stable isotopes (“isoscapes”) in ground water and tap water across South Africa. <div class="msgBox" style="margin-top:10px;"><span class="errMsg"><div>JavaScript is disabled on your browser.

Spatial analysis of hydrogen and oxygen stable isotopes (“isoscapes”) in ground water and tap water across South Africa

Please enable JavaScript to use all the features on this page. This page uses JavaScript to progressively load the article content as a user scrolls. Click the View full text link to bypass dynamically loaded article content. <a rel="nofollow" href=" full text</a></div></span></div><br /> a Department of Biological Sciences, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, 7701, Western Cape, South Africab Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USAc Department of Geology & Geophysics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA.

Posibilities databases. Organic pollutants and their correlation with stable isotopes in vegetation from King George Island, Antarctica - ScienceDirect. 2.2.

Organic pollutants and their correlation with stable isotopes in vegetation from King George Island, Antarctica - ScienceDirect

Chemical analyses Organochlorine (OC) analyses were performed at University of São Paulo (Brazil). Laboratory protocol was based on MacLeod et al. (1986) and quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) followed guidelines described by Wade and Cantillo (1994). Briefly, 10 g of wet sample were ground with anhydrous Na2SO4 and surrogate (PCB103) was added before extraction in a Soxhlet apparatus for 8 h with 80 mL of n-hexane and methylene chloride (1:1, v/v). The extract was concentrated to 1 mL and cleaned up in a column filled (from top to bottom) with 16 g alumina and 8 g silica gel (both 5% deactivated with water). OC analyses were run in a gas chromatograph equipped with an electron capture detector (GC-ECD, Agilent Technologies, model 6890N).

Response of stable carbon isotope in epilithic mosses to atmospheric nitrogen deposition. Volume 158, Issue 6, June 2010, Pages 2273–2281 Advances of air pollution science: from forest decline to multiple-stress effects on forest ecosystem services Edited By Marcus Schaub, Rainer Matyssek and Gerhard Wieser Abstract Epilithic mosses are characterized by insulation from substratum N and hence meet their N demand only by deposited N.

Response of stable carbon isotope in epilithic mosses to atmospheric nitrogen deposition

This study investigated tissue C, total Chl and δ13C of epilithic mosses along 2 transects across Guiyang urban (SW China), aiming at testing their responses to N deposition. Keywords Elevated N deposition; Bryophyte; Carbon isotopic discrimination; Photosynthesis; City ecosystem Choose an option to locate/access this article: Hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios in human hair are related to geography. Author Affiliations Contributed by Thure E.

Hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios in human hair are related to geography

Cerling, December 28, 2007 (received for review October 15, 2007) Abstract We develop and test a model to predict the geographic region-of-origin of humans based on the stable isotope composition of their scalp hair. You are what you eat. Interpreting the Data: Isotope terminology Let's quickly review some basic isotope terminology, so you know how to compare your isotope values to foods and other visitors on the graphs.

You are what you eat

When we analyze a fingernail sample for isotope ratios, we are comparing the relative amounts of a "heavier" isotope and a "lighter" isotope in your fingernail to trace what you ate. Tracking Animal Migration with Stable Isotopes. An Error Occurred Setting Your User Cookie. Bryophyte cover on trees as proxy for air humidity in the tropics. Abstract Climatic conditions are a prime candidate to explain local patterns of biodiversity and consequently there is great need of on-site climatic measurements.

Bryophyte cover on trees as proxy for air humidity in the tropics

Among them, however, air humidity is notoriously difficult and time-consuming to measure, and it has been proposed that the epiphytic bryophyte cover can be used as an indicator of long-term air humidity conditions. Here we explore the utility of visually estimated epiphytic bryophyte cover on large canopy branches as a proxy for air humidity at 26 study sites in tropical forests where we measured microclimate for at least 12 months. Across all sites, bryophyte cover was weakly related to relative air humidity (R2 = 0.17), but when we separated highland (1800–3500 m elevation) from lowland (<1800 m) sites, relative air humidity showed significant and distinct relations to bryophyte cover (R2 = 0.36–0.62), whereas temperature was related to bryophyte cover only in the lowlands (R2 = 0.36).

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