Daniel Elsberg

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Daniel Ellsberg's Website — I agree with nearly everything Jill Stein of the Greens and Rocky Anderson of the Justice Party say: except when they say “vote for me” in swing states. Here’s why: It is critical to prevent a Republican administration under Romney/Ryan from taking office in January 2013. The election is just a week away, and I want to urge those whose values are generally like mine—progressives, especially activists—to make this a high priority. An activist colleague recently said to me: “I hear you’re supporting Obama.” I was startled, and took offense. Daniel Ellsberg's Website —
Daniel Ellsberg Fears WikiLeaks Founder Julian Assange’s Life In
Daniel Ellsberg Says He Fears US Might Assassinate W RATIGAN: Do you see direct parallels between what’s developing here and what you went through? ELLSBURG: Yes, there does seem to be an immediate parallel between me and whoever leaked the video on the assault on the 19 or 20 Iraqis. Someone–allegedly, it was Bradley Manning–did feel that that deserved to be out. the “Reuters,” whose newspapermen were killed in the course of that, had been trying to get that through the freedom of information act for two years, as I understand it and had been refused. Let’s say whoever did it, hypothetically, Bradley Manning, showed better judgment in putting it out than the people who kept is secret from the American people and from the Iraqis. Daniel Ellsberg Says He Fears US Might Assassinate W
Video: Wikileaks Julian Assange Daniel Ellsberg at P
Daniel Ellsberg (born April 7, 1931) is a former United States military analyst who, while employed by the RAND Corporation, precipitated a national political controversy in 1971 when he released the Pentagon Papers, a top-secret Pentagon study of U.S. government decision-making in relation to the Vietnam War, to The New York Times and other newspapers. He was awarded the Right Livelihood Award in 2006. He is also known for popularising part of decision theory, the Ellsberg paradox (postulated before by John Maynard Keynes in 1921). Early life and career[edit] Ellsberg was born in Chicago on April 7, 1931,[1] the son of Adele D. (née Charsky) and Harry Ellsberg.[2] His parents were Ashkenazi Jews who had converted to Christian Science, and he was raised in a Christian Science atmosphere. Daniel Ellsberg Daniel Ellsberg
Documentary Film about Daniel Ellsberg, from Judith Ehrlich
The Most Dangerous Man In America (Trailer HQ 2010)
The Most Dangerous Man in America: Daniel Ellsberg and the Pentagon Papers
The Ellsberg paradox is a paradox in decision theory in which people's choices violate the postulates of subjective expected utility.[1] It is generally taken to be evidence for ambiguity aversion. The paradox was popularized by Daniel Ellsberg, although a version of it was noted considerably earlier by John Maynard Keynes.[2] Ellsberg actually proposed two separate thought experiments, the proposed choices which contradict subjective expected utility. The 2-color problem involves bets on two urns, both of which contain balls of two different colors. The 3-color problem, described below, involves bets on a single urn, which contains balls of three different colors. The 1 urn paradox[edit] Ellsberg paradox Ellsberg paradox
mediasServitude to government GleenGreenw (updated below) A newly released study from students at Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government provides the latest evidence of how thoroughly devoted the American establishment media is to amplifying and serving (rather than checking) government officials. This new study examines how waterboarding has been discussed by America’s four largest newspapers over the past 100 years, and finds that the technique, almost invariably, was unequivocally referred to as “torture” — until the U.S. Government began openly using it and insisting that it was not torture, at which time these newspapers obediently ceased describing it that way: Similarly, American newspapers are highly inclined to refer to waterboarding as “torture” when practiced by other nations, but will suddenly refuse to use the term when it’s the U.S. employing that technique: mediasServitude to government GleenGreenw
Waterboarding intheMedia pdf Harvard Waterboarding intheMedia pdf Harvard The Shorenstein Center publishes reports and papers written by Fellows and affiliated faculty members that examine themes associated with press, politics and the making of public policy. Recent papers have examined subjects such as how women political candidates use social media, how the presidential primary debate system could be reformed, and how the media cover climate change. Papers by former fellows have added significantly to the body of research on press and politics. The Shorenstein Center has had more than 200 Fellows since 1986, and the papers they wrote at the Center form the basis of numerous books, including such compilations as Terrorism, War and the Press (2003) and Politics and the Press: The News Media and Their Influences (1997).
About Us - Joan Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Pu The Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy is a Harvard University research center dedicated to exploring and illuminating the intersection of press, politics and public policy in theory and practice. The Center strives to bridge the gap between journalists and scholars, and between them and the public. Through teaching and research at the Kennedy School of Government and its program of visiting fellows, conferences and initiatives, the Center is at the forefront of its area of inquiry. To learn more about the Shorenstein Center, go to the pages dedicated to our history, director and staff, and the fellows, faculty, and courses that enliven the academic year. About Us - Joan Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Pu
POV - The Most Dangerous Man in America . Video: The Pentagon Papers, Daniel Ellsberg and <em><strong>The New York Times</strong></em> Panel Discussion On September 13, 2010, The New York Times Community Affairs Department and POV presented a panel discussion on the Pentagon Papers, Daniel Ellsberg, and the Times. The conversation, featuring Daniel Ellsberg, Max Frankel, former New York Times executive editor, and Adam Liptak, New York Times Supreme Court reporter, was moderated by Jill Abramson, managing editor of The New York Times. Jill Abramson: Good evening, everybody. I think we're gonna have a lively panel and a discussion of the very interesting film, The Most Dangerous Man in America. And seated right next to me, uh-oh, is the most dangerous man in America! POV - The Most Dangerous Man in America . Video: The Pentagon Papers, Daniel Ellsberg and <em><strong>The New York Times</strong></em> Panel Discussion