background preloader

Resources for Teaching about Energy

Facebook Twitter

Signal Hill Petroleum - Oil and Gas Energy Company. A Year in the Life of Carbon Dioxide. Launched in 2014, the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) has been collecting NASA’s first detailed, global measurements of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

A Year in the Life of Carbon Dioxide

The OCO-2 team recently released its first full year of data, which is critical to analyzing and understanding Earth’s carbon cycle. The animated map above shows global average carbon dioxide concentrations as measured by OCO-2 from September 6, 2014, to September 6, 2015. The satellite measures carbon dioxide from the top of Earth’s atmosphere to its surface. Higher concentrations appear dark orange, while lower concentrations appear yellow. The scale is relatively narrow, from 390 to 405 parts per million, the high and low measurements by OCO-2 in its first year. One recognizable pattern over the year is the annual uptake and release of carbon as each hemisphere passes through the seasons. Carbon naturally cycles through earthly environments. Related ReadingNASA (2015, November 12) A Breathing Planet, Off Balance.

Top 10 Things You Didn’t Know About Combined Heat and Power. This article is part of the Energy.gov series highlighting the “Top Things You Didn’t Know About…” Be sure to check back for more entries soon. 10.

Top 10 Things You Didn’t Know About Combined Heat and Power

Often called cogeneration or CHP, a combined heat and power system provides both electric power and heat from a single fuel source. While most power plants in the U.S. create steam as a byproduct that is then expelled as wasted heat, a CHP system captures the energy that would normally be lost in power generation and uses it to provide heating and cooling to factories and businesses. Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About Concentrating Solar Power. This article is part of the Energy.gov series highlighting the “Top Things You Didn’t Know About…” Be sure to check back for more entries soon. 10.

Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About Concentrating Solar Power

Concentrating solar power (CSP) technology involves using mirrors, sometimes in the hundreds of thousands, to reflect sunlight and collect solar heat to generate electricity. A single CSP plant can generate enough power for about 70,000 homes -- making it a major player of the utility-scale solar market. For more CSP technology basics, watch our video Energy 101: Concentrating Solar Power. Top 10 Things You Didn't Know about Enhanced Geothermal Systems. This article is part of the Energy.gov series highlighting the "Top Things You Didn't Know About...

Top 10 Things You Didn't Know about Enhanced Geothermal Systems

" series. Be sure to check back for more entries soon. 10. Geothermal technologies use the naturally occurring heat located in shallow ground, hot water and rock below the earth’s surface to generate electricity. Geothermal is considered a renewable source of energy because the earth’s core generates nearly unlimited heat. Science Education. Wind Farms through the Years. Concentrating Solar Power Facilities and Solar Potential. Click icons to filter by CSP Plant Type All Plants In Operation New in 2014 In Progress Tower and Heliostat Trough or Fresnel Parabolic Dish.

Concentrating Solar Power Facilities and Solar Potential

Utility-Scale Solar through the Years. Utility-Scale Solar through the Years. How Does a Wind Turbine Work? Map: Projected Growth of the Wind Industry From Now Until 2050. Quiz: Test Your Grid IQ. QUIZ: Test your Solar IQ. QUIZ: Test your Wind Energy IQ. QUIZ: Test your Home Energy IQ. Cloaking Buildings from Earthquakes and Tsunamis — NOVA Next. In August 2012, civil engineers from the French firm Menard drilled three rows of shallow holes into the soft clay soil at the base of the Alps near Grenoble.

Cloaking Buildings from Earthquakes and Tsunamis — NOVA Next

Each hole was roughly the depth and diameter of what a utility company might dig to secure the base of a telephone pole. Then, on one side of the boreholes, they lowered a vibrating probe several feet into the soil. On the surface, they placed a network of sensors to record vibrations. By the time the waves reached the second row of boreholes, a distance of 11 feet, their signal, which would typically travel through 160 feet of soil, hardly registered. The holes had stopped the vibrations in their tracks. Sensors sitting atop concrete blocks monitor seismic waves near the boreholes drilled as a seismic cloak. For more than 2,000 years people living in earthquake zones have tried to keep the shaking beneath their feet from destroying their buildings. From Microscopic to Massive Taming Tsunamis Protective Forests. U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis.

Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)