background preloader

Btrfs (B-Tree File System)

Facebook Twitter

Btrfs. Btrfs is a new copy on write (CoW) filesystem for Linux aimed at implementing advanced features while focusing on fault tolerance, repair and easy administration.

btrfs

Btrfs is under heavy development, but every effort is being made to keep the filesystem stable and fast. Because of the speed of development, running the latest possible Linux kernel is highly recommended. More Information on Btrfs is available at and Recent benchmarks are available here Features. Btrfs Wiki. Btrfs - Wikipedia. Btrfs (B-tree file system, pronounced as "butter F S",[11] "better F S",[8] "b-tree F S",[12] or simply by spelling it out) is a file system based on the copy-on-write (COW) principle, initially designed at Oracle Corporation for use in Linux.

Btrfs - Wikipedia

The development of Btrfs began in 2007, and by August 2014, the file system's on-disk format has been marked as stable.[13] History[edit] The core data structure of Btrfs—​​the copy-on-write B-tree—​​was originally proposed by IBM researcher Ohad Rodeh at a presentation at USENIX 2007.[15] Chris Mason, an engineer working on ReiserFS for SUSE at the time, joined Oracle later that year and began work on a new file system based on these B-trees.[16] Btrfs. Btrfs is a copy-on-write (CoW) filesystem for Linux aimed at implementing advanced features while focusing on fault tolerance, repair and easy administration.

btrfs

Jointly developed at Oracle, Red Hat, Fujitsu, Intel, SUSE, STRATO and many others, Btrfs is licensed under the GPL and open for contribution from anyone. Features Ext4 is safe and stable and can handle large filesystems with extents, but why switch? Btrfs. Translation(s): English - Русский FileSystem > Btrfs Btrfs is intended to address the lack of pooling, snapshots, checksums, and integral multi-device spanning in Linux file systems, these features being crucial as the use of Linux scales upward into larger storage configurations.

Btrfs

Btrfs is designed to be a multipurpose filesystem, scaling well on very large block devices. Even though Btrfs has been in the kernel since 2.6.29, the developers state that "as of 2.6.31, we only plan to make forward compatible disk format changes". Please note that "forward compatible changes" means that booting a newer kernel, then booting into an older kernel is risky (further citations needed). Btrfs. From Wikipedia:Btrfs: Btrfs (B-tree file system, pronounced as "butter F S", "better F S", "b-tree F S", or simply by spelling it out) is a file system based on the copy-on-write (COW) principle, initially designed at Oracle Corporation for use in Linux.

Btrfs

The development of Btrfs began in 2007, and by August 2014, the file system's on-disk format has been marked as stable. From Btrfs Wiki: What Is Btrfs Filesystem (and Why Is It Better Than Ext4)? There is more to a hard drive than its size.

What Is Btrfs Filesystem (and Why Is It Better Than Ext4)?

While the amount of disk space is all you see marketed about a hard drive on a sales page, there is actually an extensive amount of coding that goes into making a hard drive capable of handling your applications and data in the first place. Most Linux distributions currently default to using the ext4 file system, but the future for many of them lies with the B-tree file system, better known as Btrfs. To put it simply, a file system is how a hard drive is able to store, access, and manage files. While different operating systems can run off of the same hard drive, they tend not to share the same file system.

Windows users rely on the New Technology File System (NTFS) while Mac OS X currently runs on the HFS+ file system. Btrfs hands on: My first experiments with a new Linux file system. Btrfs is a new file system for Linux, one that is still very much in development.

Btrfs hands on: My first experiments with a new Linux file system

Although I wouldn't exactly describe it as "experimental" any more, it is, as stated in the Wiki at kernel.org, "a fast-moving target". It has also been said publicly that the basic format and structure of the filesystem should now be stable; it would only be changed in the future if some overriding reason or need is found. The point of all this should be clear — it is still very early days, and it is not recommended to use btrfs in critical systems of any kind.