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Cranfield University. Areas of expertise Agrifood, Food Quality, Food Safety, Environmental Technology Current activities His key research areas are:

Cranfield University

This Berlin supermarket has a vertical micro-farm inside it. INFARM is bringing fresh greens and herbs into the supermarket with its tiny vertical farms, which both grow and display the produce.

This Berlin supermarket has a vertical micro-farm inside it

While large-scale vertical urban farms may not be viable everywhere, scaled-down versions of this space-efficient growing method have been shown to be a potential good choice for a green small business, and the introduction of a new micro-scale offering from INFARM could bring the crops right into the grocery aisle. Recovery Toolkit, Zero-Waste Grocers Aim to Fight Food Packaging Waste.

This zero-waste grocery store has no packaging, plastic or big-name brands. Australian researchers are hoping to change the lives of millions of people with spinal cord injuries with a 3cm long net of electrodes and wires.

This zero-waste grocery store has no packaging, plastic or big-name brands

This ‘bionic spine’ would allow paralyzed patients to control bionic limbs with the use of subconscious thought. WeFood: Madspild for 11,6 milliarder. Stop madspild, bekæmp sult. Regulatory uncertainty over genome editing. You are using an outdated version of Firefox which is not supported by ResearchGate anymore.

Regulatory uncertainty over genome editing

For a faster, safer browsing experience, upgrade your browser now. <div class="c-box-warning full-width-element" style="text-align: center; "><div style="margin: auto; padding:10px;" class="container"><b>For full functionality of ResearchGate it is necessary to enable JavaScript. Here are the <a href=" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"> instructions how to enable JavaScript in your web browser</a>. </b></div></div> Article Regulatory uncertainty over genome editing Nature Plants 01/2015; 1(1). Genome editing opens up opportunities for the precise and rapid alteration of crops to boost yields, protect against pests and diseases and enhance nutrient content.

Seeds of change. CRISPR tweak may help gene-edited crops bypass biosafety regulation. Je Wook Woo These lettuce-plantlets have had their genomes edited with CRISPR/Cas9, but do not contain foreign DNA.

CRISPR tweak may help gene-edited crops bypass biosafety regulation

A twist on a revolutionary gene-editing technique may make it possible to modify plant genomes while sidestepping national biosafety regulations, South Korean researchers say. Europe’s genetically edited plants stuck in legal limbo. Stefan Jansson Stefan Jansson’s genetically edited thale cress (Arabidopsis) at the University of Umeå.

Europe’s genetically edited plants stuck in legal limbo

The European Commission has not yet decided if such plants should be regulated as GM organisms. Plant geneticist Stefan Jansson is champing at the bit to start field trials on crops tweaked with powerful gene-editing technologies. Gene editing ege statement. Genome editing of crops may be restricted by EU rules, warn scientists.

A fledgling technology to manipulate the genes of crops in order to make them less susceptible to disease and more productive is at risk of falling foul of the European Union’s genetic modification rules, scientists warned on Monday.

Genome editing of crops may be restricted by EU rules, warn scientists

Genome editing is different to genetic modification, because it does not usually involve transplanting genes from one plant or species to another, but on pinpointing the genetic mutations that would occur naturally through selective breeding. Gene editing could create medicines and self-fertilising crops. But are we facing another GM food-style furore? Crispr is Coming to Agriculture, with Big Implications for Food, Farmers, Consumers, and Nature. The world’s first supermarket selling only expired food has opened in Denmark. People around the world are hearing more foreign accents than at any time in human history, as more people move around than ever before.

The world’s first supermarket selling only expired food has opened in Denmark

In 2013, an estimated 232 million people (PDF) lived outside the country they’re from, seeking refuge or employment. In the US, 13% of the country’s 316 million residents are immigrants. Around 60 million of the world’s migrants have been displaced by war, including over a million Syrians, Iraqis, and Libyans who have sought asylum in Europe since 2014. These numbers don’t even capture the migration that happens within countries. In 2015, over 260 million rural Chinese are living in cities like Shanghai, Beijing, and Hong Kong, and the new arrivals don’t talk like the natives. How can business tackle double burden of obesity and undernutrition? - live chat. Obesity is “an exploding nightmare” according to a recent World Health Organisation report, and it’s swiftly rising up the political agenda.

How can business tackle double burden of obesity and undernutrition? - live chat

Associated with health complications including type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, strokes and cancer, it’s estimated that 600 million people globally are obese. In the UK, it’s predicted that obese will be the most common body type in less than twenty years. Already, it costs the NHS £6bn a year. At the same time undernutrition remains a problem, especially in lower income countries. A recent study of the world’s 22 largest food companies by the Access to Nutrition Foundation, claimed industry is moving “far too slowly” to address the double burden presented by undernutrition and obesity. CRISPR will change lives, but not only through genetic engineering. By Jacob Corn February 23 A researcher prepares DNA in a laboratory in France.

CRISPR will change lives, but not only through genetic engineering

(REUTERS/Robert Pratta) Each week, In Theory takes on a big idea in the news and explores it from a range of perspectives. This week we’re talking about human genetic engineering. Jacob Corn is scientific director of the Innovative Genomics Institute and a faculty member at the University of California at Berkeley.