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Is Digital Education the Answer

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Mark Zuckerberg Is Betting Tech Can Address Educational Equity. Is It That Simple? : NPR Ed. As I'm sure you've heard by now, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and his wife, Priscilla Chan, used the occasion of their daughter's birth to announce they'll be investing nearly all their fortune, some $45 billion, in good causes.

They announced this, of course, in a lengthy Facebook note. "Personalized learning" makes up the first item on their wish list: "Our initial areas of focus will be personalized learning, curing disease, connecting people and building strong communities. " The Chan Zuckerberg Initiative is making one main bet: Technology can broaden access to quality education. As the two write: " ... students around the world will be able to use personalized learning tools over the internet, even if they don't live near good schools. Let's do a fact check. Some studies show that these programs can produce improvements in learning, up to half a grade level in some cases and for some subjects. toggle caption Uncredited/AP Uncredited/AP So far, so good.

Welcome to the “Choose Your Own Adventure” Future of Learning — Bright. Welcome to the “Choose Your Own Adventure” Future of Learning What will school look like in 2050? Teachers from six countries respond. What will school look like in 2050? I asked TED-Ed Innovative Educators from six countries to share their ideas about the future of learning. Their answers were contradictory, fascinating, and thought provoking. Here’s what they told me: Schools won’t change much. “The classroom hasn’t changed much in the past 50 years. Schools will look completely different. “There will be no physical campus.

Schools will be very security oriented. “Because of school shootings, there will be safe rooms. Will schools even exist in 2050? “Is teaching a dying profession? Education will look nothing like it does now. “Schools will be multidisciplinary, with a focus on social justice. The classroom will be one big makerspace. “Technology like Evernote, Google, and Siri will be standard and will change what teachers value and test for. There will be more creativity in the classroom. Data Fueling Scale and Change in Higher Education. Last month, I spoke at a meeting of university and college leaders in New Mexico. After outlining some of the initiatives that we have implemented at Georgia State University to raise our graduation rates by 22 percentage points, I received an interesting comment.

The president of a small college with enrollments under 2,000 lamented, “Sure, you can implement these programs at a big university like Georgia State, but how can small colleges do the same?” How times have changed. When I assumed the position of head of student-success programs at Georgia State eight years ago, the conversation was very different. Our graduation rates were far too low, and there were significant achievement gaps between students based on race, ethnicity and income level. In short, we were a typical, large public university. It’s not that we didn’t know what would help us to improve. At Georgia State, for instance, we conducted an assessment of our academic advising six years ago.

We Learn More When We Learn Together. Dave wheeler FOR HBR We rarely grow alone. In fact, some psychologists have made a compelling case that we only grow in connection with others. However, we don’t need to learn with others in formal training or development programs: we can architect our own opportunities to gain insight, knowledge, and skills that move us on an upward trajectory. We can have more control over our learning at work if we make building high-quality connections a priority. What are high-quality connections? They’re the connections with other people in which we feel positive regard, mutuality, and vitality. Positive regard is the sense that someone sees the best in us, even if we are only connected for a short time. High-quality connections are what Barbara Fredrickson calls micro moments of love.

Research conducted by us and by others shows that there are at least eight different ways we can grow and improve through high-quality connecting. How To Transform a Traditional Class Into an Engaged One #fight4edu #engagedScholar. On Monday December 7, 5:30-7:00 pm (#fight4edu and #engagedscholar), we hosted our first event on The Engaged Scholar, this Group on HASTAC.

It was our first interactive session of The Engaged Scholar, a workshop designed to turn a traditional classroom into an engaged, student-centered space. Engaged pedagogy is the opposite of millennial bashing. Instead, it says let's look at the historical situation of the contemporary student, the institutions of higher education they have inherited, and the larger world they have inherited and that they now must shape. Given all that, how can we design a better classroom, a more engaged way of learning, to prepare them to help create a better society? We are using this Engaged Scholar site as a resource for posting syllabi, for working as a group on those syllabi, for preparing exercises, and for offering bibliography and other resources for engaged teaching. All of these ideals are embodied by this banner. This one is unique. Welcome to the “Choose Your Own Adventure” Future of Learning — Bright. Welcome to the “Choose Your Own Adventure” Future of Learning What will school look like in 2050?

Teachers from six countries respond. What will school look like in 2050? I asked TED-Ed Innovative Educators from six countries to share their ideas about the future of learning. Their answers were contradictory, fascinating, and thought provoking. Schools won’t change much. “The classroom hasn’t changed much in the past 50 years. Schools will look completely different. “There will be no physical campus.

Schools will be very security oriented. “Because of school shootings, there will be safe rooms. Will schools even exist in 2050? “Is teaching a dying profession? Education will look nothing like it does now. “Schools will be multidisciplinary, with a focus on social justice. The classroom will be one big makerspace. “Technology like Evernote, Google, and Siri will be standard and will change what teachers value and test for. There will be more creativity in the classroom. Thoughts on mentoring, and why it matters. Thoughts on mentoring, and why it matters Listen at least twice as much as you talk.

Be an advocate when it’s needed. Insist on success. Provide a safe environment, free from assumptions. January is National Mentoring Month, a celebration of mentoring and the good it can do for individuals and communities. PAESMEM winners are from all fields of science and engineering. We asked some PAESMEM alumni what makes a good mentor, and why mentoring matters, especially in STEM. D. “He put the same expectations of accomplishment on me as he did his graduate students,” Butterfield said. Today, Butterfield is a professor of biological chemistry, and associate vice president for research, at the University of Kentucky. “Maximizing STEM educational and research opportunities for all citizens of this country — regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, religious preference, or socioeconomic status — directly benefits the U.S. economic enterprise,” Butterfield said.

STEM to STEAM: Art in K-12 is Key to Building a Strong Economy. As the nation embarks on a new school year, education leaders from President Obama on down are facing a renewed commitment to the STEM subjects -- Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics -- as a driver of innovation. And what better advertisement of the power of STEM education than the recent landing of the Mars Rover? Like the original Apollo missions to the Moon, they powerfully reveal the magic of science and engineering. Just this summer, the Obama administration announced a laudable new "teacher corps" dedicated to excellence in the STEM subjects, and as far and wide as Estonia, a new policy is spurring debate about the value of teaching programming to elementary school students.

Innovation, Ingenuity and . . . Elmo? I applaud the growing and necessary focus on spurring innovation worldwide, and as a lifelong STEM student myself, I've seen firsthand the innovation that STEM education can produce. What does it mean to turn STEM to STEAM? Art and Science Reunite. How to Provide Kids With Screen Time That Supports Learning. The digital landscape of American childhood is in flux, according to surveys: Most children under the age of 8 now have access to mobile devices in their homes. In the last five years, children have spent less time watching television, but more time tapping on tablets and smartphones.

And recently the American Academy of Pediatrics has softened its zero-screentime recommendation for children under 2. Given the increased access to digital media, there’s a greater opportunity to pay closer attention to how children use devices and ways that parents and educators can use media as a tool to help children learn, according to Lisa Guernsey and Michael Levine, authors of “Tap, Click, Read: Growing Readers in a World of Screens.” From Literacy to Literacies What does it mean to be literate in a world where screens are ubiquitous? For young children, media literacy can start as simply as discussing the concept of authorship. The Three C’s of a Balanced Media Diet Using Media To Support Literacy. Schoolkids Don't Just Need iPads. They Need Data Plans. On a cloudy Tuesday afternoon in San Marcos, California, Guadalupe Lopez is guiding me through Alvin Dunn Elementary’s concrete grid of a campus. Dressed in a black sweatshirt with Minnie Mouse ears on the hood, she’s striding along with the eager confidence of a soon-to-be 7th grader just weeks away from the first day of summer.

And she has something special she wants to show me. Charging several steps ahead, she leads me into the school’s cafeteria, where dozens of black and white photos of Alvin Dunn sixth graders cover the wall. The photos, Lopez explains, are part of a research project that she and a small group of her classmates recently completed on why American businesses and government agencies should invest in at-risk youth.

“They’re spending so much on prisons, but they’re leaving us behind,” Lopez tells me, sounding far more sophisticated than she should at 12. Click to Open Overlay Gallery That, in and of itself, wasn’t all that special. Beyond Philanthropy Industry Instigator. Coding Class, Then Naptime: Computer Science For The Kindergarten Set : NPR Ed. Don't teach your kindergartner JavaScript; he can't handle all that caffeine. Jose Luis Pelaez Inc. /Blend Images/Corbis hide caption itoggle caption Jose Luis Pelaez Inc.

/Blend Images/Corbis Back when Grant Hosford's older daughter was in first grade, she signed up for an extracurricular class, building robots with a programmable Lego toy called Mindstorms. Hosford, a dot-com entrepreneur, came to visit the class and was startled to see that Naomi, who loves science and math, was both the only girl there and the youngest by a couple of years. "My first reaction was not, 'Oh, I'm going to go build a coding company.' Hosford did go on to be a co-founder of a company called codeSpark. The Foos is part of a trend toward increasing emphasis on code as a fundamental literacy. "A computer science education is literacy for the 21st century," the mayor said at the announcement. Educators, researchers and entrepreneurs like Hosford are taking that analogy very seriously.

Programming Primer. Ed-Tech Might Make Things Worse... So Now What? 5 min read The OECD released a “first-of-its-kind” report earlier this week on computers and education, eliciting – as all of its PISA-related reports tend to do – precisely the responses you’d suspect: a lot of “schools are doing it wrong.” There’s always a fair amount of handwringing about PISA scores, as though the performance of a country’s 15 year-olds on this assessment is indicative of – or hell, the final word on – the strength or weakness of its school system.

The interpretation of PISA scores tends to suffer from confirmation bias, simply affirming pre-existing beliefs about education policies and practices. And of course, PISA scores also provide the media with an opportunity to craft scary headlines about an impending doom of dumb. In some ways, this week’s report on computers’ effect on learning (or rather, their effect on PISA test scores) is no different, even though it targets a core of modern education mythology: that more technology is more better. Alice.org. The MOOC bubble and the attack on public education. In the last year, MOOCs have gotten a tremendous amount of publicity. Last November, the New York Times decided that 2012 was “the Year of the MOOC,” and columnists like David Brooks and Thomas Friedman have proclaimed ad nauseum that the MOOC “revolution” is a “tsunami” that will soon transform higher education.

As a Time cover article on MOOCs put it—in a rhetorical flourish that has become a truly dead cliché—“College is Dead. Long Live College!” Where is the hype coming from? At the same time, the speed at which an obscure form of non-credit-based online pedagogy has gone so massively mainstream demonstrates the level of investment that a variety of powerful people and institutions have made in it.

After all, when the term itself was coined in 2008— MOOC, for Massively Open Online Course—it described a rather different kind of project. The MOOCs that emerged in 2012 look very different, starting with their central narratives of “disruption” and “un-bundling.” The war against humanities. What I Worry About When I Worry About STEM — Futures Exchange. Are we training our future employees, or are we educating our present and future citizens?

My first year as a university tutor in archaeology, I had a student who was a retired engineer. A month into term, he complained that the course was too hard. He’d spent his whole life knowing — not believing, but knowing — that arts degrees were a joke. I thought he was saying that he was being unexpectedly challenged, but he was accusing me of making it harder because I didn’t want to admit it was society’s fluff. The bias toward STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) as the subjects for more intelligent, or more productive people is nothing new. It’s easier to see that they instil skills that are useful to industry, and that makes perfect sense, but only if we think education is all about a direct path to employment. Yes, STEM subjects can be more easily measured than capacity for literary theory.

Building a business is a cycle of learning and failing. Coding is hard. Will Technology Replace Thinking? | Kirk Douglas. When you get to be 96 years of age the road ahead is short, so you look back at the road you have traveled for almost 100 years. The first thing you come up against is technology. One night we took our grandchildren out for dinner. I looked around the table. Jason, the youngest, was playing games with his cellphone; Ryan, 12 years old, had his head under the table and I assumed he was watching his cellphone; Tyler, 16, and his sister Kelsey, 18, were both involved on their cellphones too.

Lisa, their mother, was frantically searching in her purse for her ringing cellphone; and Peter, their father, was leaning back, laughing loudly, on his cellphone. I looked across the table at my wife. Outside is worse. I don't have a cellphone. What will become of our world in the next 100 years? I just realized that you're probably reading this on your computer or on your cellphone while you're driving or crossing the street. Watch where you're going! ScratchJr Takes Coding into K-2 -- THE Journal. Silicon Valley Turns Its Eye to Education.

Mobile.nytimes. Glogin?mobile=1&URI= Teacherpreneurs: We're Here to Inspire. Scratch | Home | imagine, program, share. ScratchJr. New Scientist: Kindergarten Coders Can Program Before They Can Read. France in the Year 2000, Imagined by Illustrators in 1900. Teaching Machines and Turing Machines: The History of the Future of Labor and Learning.

Will Technology Replace Thinking? | Kirk Douglas. Is the Internet Really Making Me Stupid, Crazy, and Constantly Distracted? Why STEM Should Care About the Humanities – The Conversation - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education. Teachers in diverse areas are learning how to promote programming. Glogin?URI= Computing in the Classroom. iPads < Teachers — Bright. Do Tablets in the Classroom Really Help Children Learn? What Can Technology Do for Tomorrow’s Children? — Bright. The Invented History of 'The Factory Model of Education' What to Learn in College to Stay One Step Ahead of Computers. Edutopia. The Era of the Teacherpreneur. Learning to Program With MaKey MaKey in Elementary School. Edutopia. Edutopia. STEM to STEAM: Resource Roundup. Technological Vs. Creative Thought.

Why Web Literacy Matters, Too — Bright. What Wearable Tech Could Mean for the Classroom. Edutopia. Mobile screens: Do they really turn your kids' brains to mush? Why Higher Ed and Business Need to Work Together. Welcome to Forbes. How Should We Approach Education’s Digital Divide? — Bright. Teaching Machines and Turing Machines: The History of the Future of Labor and Learning. Coding Camp to Baltimore Schools: Bring Us Your Bored! : NPR Ed. Coding Camp for Minority Boys Where Mentors Make a Big Difference. YouthSpark Challenge for Change.

5 Big Ideas That Don't Work In Education : NPR Ed. 10 Emerging Education Technologies. Tools for Tailored Learning May Expose Students’ Personal Details. Facebook Takes a Step Into Education Software. How I Became A Teacher Intrapeneur. 4 Ideas to Inspire #TEWeek Followers. Liberal Arts Degree in Demand. Digital Pedagodgy. What Schools Hope to Achieve by Making Computer Science Widespread.