The Start-up Owner's Manual: Customer Development Experiments Editor's note: This post is part of a series featuring excerpts from the recently published book, The Startup Owner's Manual, written by serial entrepreneurs-turned-educators Steve Blank and Bob Dorf. Come back each week for more how-tos from this 608-page guide. Once your Business Model Canvas is done, it's time for your team to "get out of the building" to test your hypotheses. You need to answer three key questions: Do we really understand the customer's problem or need?Do enough people care about the problem or need to deliver a huge business? The Start-up Owner's Manual: Customer Development Experiments
Run a Disciplined Innovation Experiment - Video
Intellectual Flexibility
Improved Environment for Innovation Improved Environment for Innovation Experimentation + Risk (+ Failure) by Robert F. Brands Innovation rarely occurs by accident, but is the result of calculated effort, work and risk taking.
The final point that Jeff Pfeffer and I make in Hard Facts is about failure. We emphasize that is impossible to run an organization without making a lot of mistakes. Innovation always entails failure. Most new products and companies don’t survive. And if you want creativity without failure, you are living in a fool’s paradise. The Best Diagnostic Question and Amazon The Best Diagnostic Question and Amazon
by Rita McGrath | 9:55 AM March 26, 2010 Despite widespread recognition that challenging times place unpredictable demands on people and businesses, I still run across many managers who would prefer to avoid the logical conclusion that stems from this: failure is a lot more common in highly uncertain environments than it is in better-understood situations. Instead of learning from failures, many executives seek to keep them hidden or to pretend that they were all part of a master plan and no big deal. To those executives, let me argue that an extraordinarily valuable corporate resource is being wasted if learning from failures is inhibited. Are You Squandering Your Intelligent Failures? - Rita McGrath Are You Squandering Your Intelligent Failures? - Rita McGrath
Column: Why Businesses Don’t Experiment Column: Why Businesses Don’t Experiment A few years ago, a marketing team from a major consumer goods company came to my lab eager to test some new pricing mechanisms using principles of behavioral economics. We decided to start by testing the allure of “free,” a subject my students and I had been studying. I was excited: The company would gain insights into its customers’ decision making, and we’d get useful data for our academic work. The team agreed to create multiple websites with different offers and pricing and then observe how each worked out in terms of appeal, orders, and revenue.
Experiments – the Key to Innovation There is a big problem that organisations often face: they want to be innovative, but they also want to minimise risk. This creates a certain amount of tension. If I had to pick the number one thing that I would recommend to organisations that are trying to become more innovative, it would be this: experiment. Experiment all the time. Try everything that you can possibly think of to try. Experiments – the Key to Innovation
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By Saul Kaplan, contributor FORTUNE -- Learn by doing. Constantly test new ideas. Learn, share and repeat. The world is ever changing -- stay ahead of the curve. Embrace the art of discovery. To innovate, experiment To innovate, experiment
There’s been a lot of buzz about Steven Johnson’s book Where Good Ideas Come From. An article in Foreign Policy by Stephen Walt addresses the opposite question: Where Do Bad Ideas Come From? He is talking about bad ideas in foreign policy, such as the domino effect, which have been used to justify policy but which have failed to be supported by actual facts or events. In part, Walt thinks that bad ideas result from an inability to learn from error: All countries have obvious incentives to learn from past mistakes, but those that have successfully risen to the status of great powers may be less inclined to adapt quickly in the future. Where Do Bad Ideas Come From? Where Do Bad Ideas Come From?