Data & Information Privacy

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Proxy server

Communication between two computers (shown in grey) connected through a third computer (shown in red) acting as a proxy. Note that Bob doesn't know whom the information is going to, which is why proxies can be used to protect privacy. Types of proxy[edit] A proxy server may reside on the user's local computer, or at various points between the user's computer and destination servers on the Internet. Proxy server
What has long been an EFF issue is once again making headlines. In recent days, the world is seeing damning reports of authoritarian regimes spying on their citizens using American- and European-made surveillance technologies, with new evidence emerging from Bahrain, Libya, Syria, and Thailand. Last week, Bloomberg reported on Bahrain’s use of Nokia-Siemens surveillance software to intercept messages and gather information on human rights activists, resulting in their arrest and torture. A Wall Street Journal article published this week alleges the use of products in Libya created by the French company Amesys and the South African firm VASTech SA Pty Ltd. Government Internet Surveillance Starts With Eyes Built in the West Government Internet Surveillance Starts With Eyes Built in the West
Mrs. Kroes: Will You Let Them Control the Net? Mrs. Kroes: Will You Let Them Control the Net? Today, European Commissioner for the Digital Agenda, Neelie Kroes, met1 with the CEOs of corporations acting towards more control over internet communications, to discuss the future of Internet policy. After misleadingly pretending there is no problem with operators restricting Net neutrality, and her choice not to protect freedom of information online… will Mrs. Kroes let dominant actors alter Internet's architecture? During her confirmation hearing2 before the European Parliament, Commissioner Kroes made unequivocal statements against commercially motivated anti-Net-neutrality practices. One can wonder today if these words were just political rhetoric. In spite of her liberal stance, Commissioner Kroes now seems willing to let big companies control the network and its architecture to complete short-term economic goals at the expense of competition, innovation and freedoms online.
Online, in the workplace and in your health life, you cannot avoid privacy concerns. Identity theft, stolen credit cards, workplace surveillance, online medical records and other issues all touch on your rights as an individual to maintain privacy. The following list contains Web sites, articles and tools that you can use to learn about your rights as a U.S. citizen to your privacy, and how you can maintain that privacy through certain measures and with help from advocacy organizations. Information Privacy Information Privacy
Identity Theft Resource Center | A Nonprofit Organization Identity theft continues to be one of the fastest growing crimes in the United States. It is important for consumers to recognize that identity theft is not just a financial crime. This crime varies widely, and can include financial identity theft (checking and/or credit card fraud), criminal identity theft, governmental identity theft, and medical identity theft. Identity theft is a crime in which an impostor obtains key pieces of personal identifying information (PII). Identity Theft Resource Center | A Nonprofit Organization
All over the world – from the Americas to Europe to the Middle East to Africa and Asia – companies in the Information & Communications Technology (ICT) sector face increasing government pressure to comply with domestic laws and policies in ways that may conflict with the internationally recognized human rights of freedom of expression and privacy. In response, a multi-stakeholder group of companies, civil society organizations (including human rights and press freedom groups), investors and academics spent two years negotiating and creating a collaborative approach to protect and advance freedom of expression and privacy in the ICT sector, and have formed an Initiative to take this work forward. Global Network Initiative human rights Global Network Initiative human rights
Mozilla Firefox, Portable Edition

Mozilla Firefox, Portable Edition

your browser, your way... in your pocket™ Mozilla Firefox®, Portable Edition is the popular Mozilla Firefox web browser bundled with a PortableApps.com Launcher as a portable app, so you can take your bookmarks, extensions and saved passwords with you. - Support PortableApps.com's development and hosting Mozilla Firefox, Portable Edition works best with the PortableApps.com Platform Also Available: Mozilla Firefox ESR, Portable Edition 24.x and Mozilla Firefox, Portable Edition Beta Features
OpenPGP encrypt standard OpenPGP is the most widely used email encryption standard in the world. It is defined by the OpenPGP Working Group of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) Proposed Standard RFC 4880. The OpenPGP standard was originally derived from PGP (Pretty Good Privacy), first created by Phil Zimmermann in 1991. The OpenPGP Alliance is a growing group of companies and other organizations that are implementers of the OpenPGP Proposed Standard. OpenPGP encrypt standard
The GNU Privacy Guard - GnuPG.org GnuPG is the GNU project's complete and free implementation of the OpenPGP standard as defined by RFC4880. GnuPG allows to encrypt and sign your data and communication, features a versatile key management system as well as access modules for all kinds of public key directories. GnuPG, also known as GPG, is a command line tool with features for easy integration with other applications. A wealth of frontend applications and libraries are available.

The GNU Privacy Guard - GnuPG.org

Using the GNU Privacy Guard
GNU Privacy Guard (GnuPG or GPG) is a GPL Licensed alternative to the PGP suite of cryptographic software. GnuPG is compliant with RFC 4880, which is the current IETF standards track specification of OpenPGP. Current versions of PGP (and Veridis' Filecrypt) are interoperable with GnuPG and other OpenPGP-compliant systems. GnuPG is a part of the Free Software Foundation's GNU software project, and has received major funding from the German government.[3] History[edit] GnuPG is a system compliant to the OpenPGP standard, thus the history of OpenPGP is of importance; it was designed to interoperate with PGP, the email encryption program initially designed and developed by Phil Zimmermann.[5][6] GNU Privacy Guard GNU Privacy Guard
electronics research

Digital World Freedom