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Admirable People

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Denis Diderot. Denis Diderot (French: [dəni didʁo]) (5 October 1713 – 31 July 1784) was a French philosopher, art critic and writer.

Denis Diderot

He was a prominent person during the Enlightenment, and is best known for serving as co-founder, chief editor and contributor to the Encyclopédie along with Jean le Rond d'Alembert. Diderot also contributed to literature, notably with Jacques le fataliste et son maître (Jacques the Fatalist and his Master), which emulated Laurence Sterne in challenging conventions regarding novels and their structure and content,[citation needed] while also examining philosophical ideas about free will.

Alexis de Tocqueville - Wikipedia. Alexis-Charles-Henri Clérel de Tocqueville (French: [alɛksi ʃaʁl ɑ̃ʁi kleʁɛl də tɔkvil]; 29 July 1805 – 16 April 1859) was a French diplomat, political scientist, and historian.

Alexis de Tocqueville - Wikipedia

William Caldwell (ranger) William Caldwell (c. 1750 – 20 February 1822), was a Scots-Irish immigrant to North America who became a soldier with the British Indian Department.

William Caldwell (ranger)

He fought against the American rebels in the American Revolutionary War, especially with Butler's Rangers, based near upstate New York. After the war, together with other Loyalists, Caldwell was granted land in Upper Canada (now Ontario). He helped found the town of Amherstburg, near the mouth of the Detroit River. He also served as a Lieutenant Colonel in the War of 1812, and from 1814-1815 as the Superintendent of Indians in the Western Department. Historyofwillcou02maue. Alexander Shulgin. Alexander "Sasha" Theodore Shulgin[2] (born June 17, 1925) is an American medicinal chemist, biochemist, pharmacologist, psychopharmacologist, and author.

Alexander Shulgin

Shulgin is credited with introducing MDMA ("ecstasy") to psychologists in the late 1970s for psychopharmaceutical use. Look-up or Select Classes Results; Look-up or Select Classes; Registration; Registration and Records Tab. Kadambini Ganguly. Kadambini Ganguly (Bengali: কাদম্বিনী গাঙ্গুলি) (18 July 1861 – 3 October 1923) was one of the first female graduates of the British Empire along with Chandramukhi Basu.

Kadambini Ganguly

She was also one of the first female physicians of South Asia to be trained in western medicine. Early life[edit] The daughter of Brahmo reformer Braja Kishore Basu, she was born on 18 July 1861 at Bhagalpur, Bihar in British India. The family was from Chandsi, in Barisal which is now in Bangladesh. Her father was headmaster of Bhagalpur School. Kadambini started her education at Banga Mahila Vidyalaya and while at Bethune School (established by Bethune) in 1878 became the first woman to pass the University of Calcutta entrance examination.

Medical education and profession[edit] Ganguly studied medicine at the Calcutta Medical College. Epistolæ: Letter sent by Eangyth, abbess. Epistolæ: Women's Biography: Marcella. Angela Merici. Obituary: Jacquetta Hawkes - People - News. She was born Jacquetta Hopkins in 1910, the third child of Sir Frederick Gowland Hopkins and Lady Hopkins (nee Jessie Stephens).

Obituary: Jacquetta Hawkes - People - News

Her father was a fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, where his researches into biochemistry led to his discovery of vitamins for which in 1929 he was awarded a Nobel Prize. He was a cousin of the poet Gerard Manley Hopkins. His younger daughter combined the rigours of scholarly research with the imagination of a poet and a writer. Jacquetta was a remarkable child. She seems to have had an idyllically happy childhood. She was educated as a day girl at the Perse School and became the first woman able to study the newly established full degree course in archaeology and anthropology, then the only one in the country. The Vitamin Myth: Why We Think We Need Supplements - Paul Offit. On October 10, 2011, researchers from the University of Minnesota found that women who took supplemental multivitamins died at rates higher than those who didn't.

The Vitamin Myth: Why We Think We Need Supplements - Paul Offit

Two days later, researchers from the Cleveland Clinic found that men who took vitamin E had an increased risk of prostate cancer. "It's been a tough week for vitamins," said Carrie Gann of ABC News. These findings weren't new. Seven previous studies had already shown that vitamins increased the risk of cancer and heart disease and shortened lives. Still, in 2012, more than half of all Americans took some form of vitamin supplements. In 1931, Linus Pauling published a paper in the Journal of the American Chemical Society titled "The Nature of the Chemical Bond. " Philo Carpenter. Philo Carpenter (1805–1886) was Chicago, Illinois' first pharmacist,[1] and an outspoken abolitionist.

Philo Carpenter

Born in Savoy, Massachusetts, February 27, 1805, young Philo learned medicine and the pharmaceutical trade in Troy, New York in the drugstore of Amatus Robins, eventually gaining a half interest in the business. There he married Sarah Bridges in May 1830, but she died that November. Nikolay Przhevalsky. Nikolai Mikhaylovich Przhevalsky[nb 1] April 12 [O.S. 31 March] 1839 – November 1 [O.S. 20 October] 1888), was a Russian geographer[1] and a renowned explorer of Central and Eastern Asia.

Nikolay Przhevalsky

Although he never reached his ultimate goal, the holy city of Lhasa in Tibet, he traveled through regions then unknown to the West, such as northern Tibet, modern Qinghai and Dzungaria (northern Xinjiang).[2] He contributed significantly to European knowledge of Central Asia and was the first known European to describe the only extant species of wild horse,[3] which is named after him. Biography[edit]