background preloader

Tech Tools

Facebook Twitter

Building Good Search Skills: What Students Need to Know. Getty The Internet has made researching subjects deceptively effortless for students — or so it may seem to them at first.

Building Good Search Skills: What Students Need to Know

Truth is, students who haven’t been taught the skills to conduct good research will invariably come up short. That’s part of the argument made by Wheaton College Professor Alan Jacobs in The Atlantic, who says the ease of search and user interface of fee-based databases have failed to keep up with those of free search engines. In combination with the well-documented gaps in students’ search skills, he suggests that this creates a perfect storm for the abandonment of scholarly databases in favor of search engines. He concludes: “Maybe our greater emphasis shouldn’t be on training users to work with bad search tools, but to improve the search tools.” His article is responding to a larger, ongoing conversation about whether the ubiquity of Web search is good or bad for serious research.

So what are the hallmarks of a good online search education? Related. The Epic BYOD Toolchest (51 Tools You Can Use Now) You've got every device under the sun in front of you.

The Epic BYOD Toolchest (51 Tools You Can Use Now)

Now what apps are you going to use? Here are the apps or app categories that I recommend you test for your school. There are lots of apps, and these are just my opinion based on what I've used with my students or successfully tested. Formative Assessment Socrative: My all-time favorite app for formative assessment runs on everything. Screencasting and Capturing What Happens in Class If you're going to share and interact with your students in the electronic and physical spaces (as you should), you must learn how to screencast. Screencastomatic: This is my go-to app. Content-Sharing Platforms Your school is bricks and clicks. Sophia: Nudged along by my friend Todd Nesloney, I use Sophia for my computer applications instruction and am very pleased with the results.Haiku Learning: This is the full content management system that I'm trying to get our school to adopt.

There are many other apps like Moodle, Canvas, and Coursesites. 5 Tips for Classroom Management With Mobile Devices. When adopting technology in the classroom, one of the key concerns for teachers and administrators is classroom management.

5 Tips for Classroom Management With Mobile Devices

I am often asked if there is a way to “lock down an iPad screen” or “ensure students cannot go to inappropriate websites” (e.g. Social Media). In other words, how do we keep students on task and are not distracted by the novelty of gadgets or communicating with friends via texting or social media. Often, teachers will take up devices (such as mobile phones) to avoid the issue of students texting or checking Facebook on their phones (eliminating access to a powerful, pocket computer in the process).

Classroom management is a challenging skill which I consistently strive to improve on a regular basis. Establish Clear Expectations Just as I start out the school year with “Class Rules” that we make and agree to as a group, we also establish expectations for when we use technology. Let them “Get the Giggles Out” Engagement is Key Two Eyes, Two Feet. How Teachers Make Cell Phones Work in the Classroom.

A.P.

How Teachers Make Cell Phones Work in the Classroom

Chemistry students use their cell phones to answer their teacher's question. When we talk about using cell phones in class, we’re not just talking about using cell phones in class. The idea of mobile learning touches on just about every subject that any technology addresses: social media, digital citizenship, content-knowledge versus skill-building, Internet filtering and safety laws, teaching techniques, bring-your-own-device policies, school budgets. At its core, the issues associated with mobile learning get to the very fundamentals of what happens in class everyday.

At their best, cell phones and mobile devices seamlessly facilitate what students and teachers already do in thriving, inspiring classrooms. In the most ideal class settings, mobile devices disappear into the background, like markers and whiteboards, pencil and paper – not because they’re not being used, but because they’re simply tools, a means to an end. In Ramsey Musallam’s A.P. Related. Gone Google Story Builder. Evernote Notebook. Scratch - Imagine, Program, Share.

Free Technology for Teachers.