"Théories du complot" / "Révisionisme en temps réel"

Facebook Twitter
Why people believe in conspiracy theories We’ve written before about the historical and social aspects of conspiracy theories, but wanted to learn more about the psychology of people who believe, for instance, that the Boston Marathon bombing was a government “false flag” operation. Psychological forces like motivated reasoning have long been associated with conspiracy thinking, but scientists are learning more every year. For instance, a British study published last year found that people who believe one conspiracy theory are prone to believe many, even ones that are completely contradictory. Professor Stephan Lewandowsky, a cognitive scientist at the University of Western Australia, published a paper late last month in the journal Psychological Science that has received widespread praise for looking at the thinking behind conspiracy theories about science and climate change. We asked him to explain the psychology of conspiracy theories. Why people believe in conspiracy theories
Ginna Husting, Boise State UniversityMartin Orr, Boise State University Abstract In a culture of fear, we should expect the rise of new mechanisms of social control to deflect distrust, anxiety, and threat. Relying on the analysis of popular and academic texts, we examine one such mechanism, the label conspiracy theory, and explore how it works in public discourse to "go meta" by sidestepping the examination of evidence. "Dangerous Machinery: "Conspiracy Theorist" as a Transpersonal Strategy" by Ginna Husting, et al. "Dangerous Machinery: "Conspiracy Theorist" as a Transpersonal Strategy" by Ginna Husting, et al.
To believe that the U.S. government planned or deliberately allowed the 9/11 attacks, you’d have to posit that President Bush intentionally sacrificed 3,000 Americans. To believe that explosives, not planes, brought down the buildings, you’d have to imagine an operation large enough to plant the devices without anyone getting caught. To insist that the truth remains hidden, you’d have to assume that everyone who has reviewed the attacks and the events leading up to them—the CIA, the Justice Department, the Federal Aviation Administration, the North American Aerospace Defense Command, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, scientific organizations, peer-reviewed journals, news organizations, the airlines, and local law enforcement agencies in three states—was incompetent, deceived, or part of the cover-up.And yet, as Slate’s Jeremy Stahl points out, millions of Americans hold these beliefs. The Fascinating Psychology of People Who Know the Real Truth About JFK, UFOs, and 9/11 The Fascinating Psychology of People Who Know the Real Truth About JFK, UFOs, and 9/11
“What about building 7?” A social psychological study of online discussion of 9/11 conspiracy theories | Frontiers in Personality Science and Individual Differences “What about building 7?” A social psychological study of online discussion of 9/11 conspiracy theories | Frontiers in Personality Science and Individual Differences School of Psychology, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Kent, Canterbury, UK Recent research into the psychology of conspiracy belief has highlighted the importance of belief systems in the acceptance or rejection of conspiracy theories. We examined a large sample of conspiracist (pro-conspiracy-theory) and conventionalist (anti-conspiracy-theory) comments on news websites in order to investigate the relative importance of promoting alternative explanations vs. rejecting conventional explanations for events. In accordance with our hypotheses, we found that conspiracist commenters were more likely to argue against the opposing interpretation and less likely to argue in favor of their own interpretation, while the opposite was true of conventionalist commenters. However, conspiracist comments were more likely to explicitly put forward an account than conventionalist comments were.
“What about building 7?” A social psychological study of online discussion of 9/11 conspiracy theories | Frontiers in Personality Science and Individual Differences
crispian__s_conspiracy_flowchart
Motivated reasoning: Fuel for controversies, conspiracy theories and science denialism alike | Absolutely Maybe Motivated reasoning: Fuel for controversies, conspiracy theories and science denialism alike | Absolutely Maybe Pieces of information, disputed and not, can be woven very quickly into competing explanatory narratives. Press the right buttons, then it can be lightning fast to order them into a line leading to this or that logical conclusion. Those narratives can cause feuds that won’t quit and entrenched positions of extreme certitude from which people can’t budge.
“What about building 7?” A social psychological study of online discussion of 9/11 conspiracy theories | Frontiers in Personality Science and Individual Differences “What about building 7?” A social psychological study of online discussion of 9/11 conspiracy theories | Frontiers in Personality Science and Individual Differences “The Internet was made for conspiracy theory: it is a conspiracy theory: one thing leads to another, always another link leading you deeper into no thing and no place.” (Stewart, 1999, p. 18). Conspiracy theories, defined as allegations that powerful people or organizations are plotting together in secret to achieve sinister ends through deception of the public (Abalakina-Paap et al., 1999; Wood et al., 2012), have long been an important element of popular discourse. With the advent of the Internet, they have become more visible than ever. Although the psychological literature on conspiracy belief has a relatively short history, with most of the relevant research having been conducted only within the past twenty years, it has revealed a great deal regarding individual differences between those who generally believe conspiracy theories (whom we call “conspiracists”) and those who prefer conventional explanations (whom we call “conventionalists”).
Dead and alive: Beliefs in contradictory conspiracy theories. | Robbie Sutton Dead and alive: Beliefs in contradictory conspiracy theories. | Robbie Sutton Committee began as a seemingly outlandish conspiracy theory, but turned out to be true (Bale, 2007). However, conspiracy beliefs, even when wrong, are notor iously resistant to f alsification, and can take on the appearance of a “degenerating research program” (Clarke, 2002, p. 136), with new layers of conspiracy being ad ded to rationalize each new piece of disconfirming evidence. Spurred in part by the growth of new media, conspiracism has become a major subcultural phenomenon. This shift has not gone unnoticed in academia. In recent decades there has been an explosion of research into the psychology of belief in conspiracy theori es.
New Research: The Psychology of Conspiracy Theorists and Climate Change Deniers
11-Septembre : non, 58% des Français ne croient pas à la théorie du complot Un récent sondage effectué par Junior Conseil pour ReOpen911 est cité avec un plaisir non-dissimulé par les représentants du 9/11 Truth Movement français comme une preuve que leurs idées ont fait leur chemin dans la population française – ce qui ne serait pas un argument logique pour une théorie du complot, mais rassurerait sans doute les conspirationnistes. Une lecture superficielle des résultats publiés laisse en effet penser que 58% des sondés, soit ici 290 personnes et non comme annoncé "58% des Français", ont des doutes sur la "version officielle" selon laquelle les attentats ont été commis par des terroristes islamistes. Le sondage fut effectué par téléphone, entre le 6 et le 24 juin 2011, sur un échantillon de 500 personnes. 11-Septembre : non, 58% des Français ne croient pas à la théorie du complot
Conspiracy theories in France – interim report - Conspiracy-Theories-in-France-interim-report-3rd-May.pdf
Clash entre Cohen et Taddeï dans "C à vous" à propos d'Alain Soral, Dieudonné, Tariq Ramadan ou Marc-Édouard Nabe (FRANCE 5) CLASH PATRICK COHEN / FRÉDÉRIC TADDEÏ. Ce vendredi, France 2 diffusera la deuxième émission de "Ce soir ou jamais" sur son antenne, après sept années sur France 3. Clash Taddéï vs Cohen : peut-on inviter Dieudonné et Soral dans "Ce soir ou jamais" Clash Taddéï vs Cohen : peut-on inviter Dieudonné et Soral dans "Ce soir ou jamais"
Pierre-André Taguieff

Rudy Reichstadt

Nsa | | Conspiracy Watch / Observatoire du conspirationnisme Nsa | | Conspiracy Watch / Observatoire du conspirationnisme Conspiracy Watch Observatoire du conspirationnisme et des théories du complot Recherche Contact conspiracywatch@gmail.com Pour bien commencer...
Tableau // Source inconnue
Tableau // Source inconnue // PDF
t
Théories du complot : 11 questions à Pierre-André Taguieff (1/4) Penser les événements historiques selon le schème du complot, c’est les concevoir comme les réalisations observables d’intentions conscientes. Dans cette perspective, celle de la « thèse du complot » ou de la « théorie du complot », expliquer un phénomène par ses causes, c’est identifier le sujet individuel ou collectif porteur de l’intention qui se serait réalisée dans l’Histoire. Ces sujets, individuels ou groupaux, sont conçus comme des agents dont les intentions ou les visées ont une valeur ou une fonction causale.
Théories du complot : 11 questions à Pierre-André Taguieff (2/4) Expliquons-nous. Toute interprétation de style conspirationniste se compose, tout d’abord, d’un dévoilement, qui implique l’attribution du phénomène considéré – naturel ou social – à des intentions cachées ou à des influences occultes qui lui donnent son sens, ensuite d’une accusation visant les membres du groupe dévoilés (« c’est leur faute »), enfin, d’une condamnation morale des « responsables » et/ou « coupables » ainsi désignés et démasqués, en tant que porteurs de mauvaises intentions, censés opérer dans les coulisses de la scène historique. Les récits de « révélation » ou de « dévoilement », loin d’être des produits de la modernité, apparaissent à certains égards comme des expressions d’un invariant anthropologique.
Théories du complot : 11 questions à Pierre-André Taguieff (3/4) Face aux faussaires et aux stratèges cyniques, on peut retourner la question complotiste par excellence : « À qui profite la diffusion de tel ou tel récit conspirationniste ? » Quels sont les intérêts rationnels des faussaires et des diffuseurs ? À quelle demande sociale se proposent-ils de répondre ? Quels sont leurs objectifs ? On ne peut répondre correctement à ces questions qu’en étudiant de près le contexte et les acteurs : chaque « affaire » complotiste est singulière. C.
Théories du complot : 11 questions à Pierre-André Taguieff (4/4) « Les Juifs ont un pied dans la banque et l’autre dans le mouvement socialiste (…). Eh bien, tout ce monde juif, formant une secte exploitante, un peuple sangsue, un unique parasite dévorant, étroitement et intimement organisé, non seulement à travers les frontières des États, mais encore à travers toutes les différences des opinions politiques – ce monde juif est aujourd’hui en grande partie à la disposition de Marx d’un côté, de Rothschild de l’autre. » Mais imaginer un grand complot menaçant, c’est déjà se préparer à imaginer un contre-complot. Contre son ennemi réactionnaire international fictionné comme un méga-conspirateur, l’anarchiste Bakounine avait logiquement créé, en 1864, une « Société internationale secrète de l’émancipation de l’humanité ». Une conspiration pour en finir avec les conspirations : le cercle vicieux est la loi du genre complotiste.
Décrypter les rhétoriques de la conspiration - Séminaire de la RDJ
Radicalisation politique et théories - Séminaire RDJ
Les cinq règles de la rhétorique conspirationniste C’est pour cette raison que le conspirationnisme doit être pris au sérieux, non pas tant dans son fond, que dans sa dimension idéologique et mystique. Car s’il est réenchantement du monde, c’est parce qu’il promet aux initiés d’accéder au monde invisible, pas celui de Dieu dans un univers sécularisé, mais celui de ses vrais maîtres. Et cette révélation est d’ailleurs désormais librement accessible à tous par le biais notamment d’Internet, qui autorise le rayonnement d’informations qui seraient restées confidentielles dans un autre état des structures de la sphère publique. Comme l’écrit Corcuff : « le “complot” s’est démocratisé » (20). Son analyse partage d’ailleurs avec celle des rumeurs d’avoir été saisie concomitamment par plusieurs disciplines scientifiques (21).
"Repolitiser" la parole complotiste
La paranoïa (1/4) : La théorie du complot - Idées
Le Cercle de l'Oratoire

Gérald Bronner sur France Culture
La société de l’information a-t-elle noyé notre esprit critique ?
Autres Collections:La démocratie des crédules
Théories du Complot : pourquoi un tel succès sur le Net ?
Théories du Complot : pourquoi un tel succès sur le Net ? - Europe1.fr - Benjamin Petrover
Des complots au grand complet
Fourest et les complotistes : posons les bonnes questions sur la manipulation de l'info
Fourest aurait-elle raison contre les complotistes?
La moitié des Français croient aux théories du complot
« Monsieur, vous dites ça parce que vous êtes un Illuminati »
174. La fin des complots | Nouvelle Societe
NASA Faked the Moon Landing—Therefore, (Climate) Science Is a Hoax
One in four Americans think Obama may be the antichrist, survey says | World news
'What a Conspiracy Theorist Believes' - disinformation
Moon Landing Faked!!!—Why People Believe in Conspiracy Theories
Les sectes politiques et leurs gourous : Soral, Asselineau, Chouard
Témoignage : “Oui, je me suis fait avoir par Etienne Chouard” | Conspis hors de nos vi[ll]es
Etienne Chouard et ses inspirateurs d’extrême droite | Conspis hors de nos vi[ll]es
Lancement d’un site qui démonte la supercherie Etienne Chouard
Mon humble avis sur Chouard
Lettre ouverte à Etienne Chouard
Etienne Chouard, « ami » et promoteur des idéologues fascisants, invité par l’IAE de Caen - Initiative Communiste Ouvriere
La connerie du jour : « Moi je parle avec tout le monde » | Brasiers et Cerisiers
Etienne Chouard chez les Amis du Monde diplo : la descente aux enfers
Les liens entre etienne chouard et l’extrême droite. | Les morbacks véners
"Ouvrir son esprit" n'est point "Vendre son âme". Faudrait voir à pas tout mélanger. Quand même. : Affreux, Sale, Bête et Méchant
Monolecte, étienne chouard et les « vrais antifa ». | Les morbacks véners
Tweet
♫ Chouard, tes copains je n’les oublierai jamais, di doua di di doua di dam di di dou ♫ | Spanish Bombs
Tableau
Etienne Chouard, porte voix de Kadhafi | contresubversion
Une énième preuve des TRES mauvaises fréquentations d'Etienne CHOUARD - WatchMen
Bon, ben puisque Chouard ne répond pas, parlons de son blog
Gloubi-boulga intellectuel
#Chouard à l’école du "Confusionnisme" (#conspis, hors de nos vies !) | les échos de la gauchosphère
Commentaires
WordPress.com
Le fascisme n'est pas assimilable à l'antisémitisme
DEMAGOPOLIS | Anti-blog du plan C
chouard-jedi1.jpg 436 × 544 pixels
Faut-il jeter le Diplo avec l'eau du complot ? - Le blog de luftmench
Réponse d'EC
Ce que l’extrême droite ne nous prendra pas
DEMAGOPOLIS | Anti-blog du plan C
Censure du film "Dédale, un fil vers la démocratie"
Dédale - Un fil vers la démocratie - projetgentilsvirus
ATTAC / Conférence d'Étienne Chouard annulée / Oct 2012
Tweet
Humour

Blowback

Reflets

L’air du soupçon
Soral – Collon - Bricmont : Investig’Action répond à la vidéo de Soral
L’air du soupçon
FBI calls half of populace with 9/11 doubts potential terrorists
La liste de Patrick Cohen
Patrick Cohen juge «hallucinantes» les critiques de Daniel Schneidermann
Daniel Schneidermann, l'idiot utile des dieudonnistes
Reponse_a_la_note_sur_le_cas_Chouard
Microsoft Word - PPP_Release_National_ConspiracyTheories_040213 - PPP_Release_National_ConspiracyTheories_040213.pdf
Citoyens de Gauche contre le conspirationnisme et l'antisémitisme
Les Amis du Monde diplomatique tentés par la théorie du complot ?
Americans and Their Conspiracy Theories - At the Edge
Why Rational People Buy Into Conspiracy Theories
Le conspirationnisme contemporain : une vieille histoire
Défiances modernes, théories du complot et critique radicale
Dossier Conspirationnisme : le boulet de la critique sociale
Rumeurs

Conspiracy Theory Flowchart