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Wolters Kluwer. Auditory processing disorder: An overview for the clinician. It was not that long ago that the “central auditory test battery” for the average audiologist consisted of presenting a few PB words with some ipsilateral white noise masking tossed in.

Auditory processing disorder: An overview for the clinician

Depending on whose article you read, the performance for normals on this test could be anywhere from 35% to 75%, so whatever score the patient obtained was usually okay. Fortunately, a lot has changed since then, and we have many people to thank. One of the first chapters on central auditory testing in an audiology text was by Ettore Bocca, the 1963 edition of Modern Developments in Audiology. It's still a good read today. I'm guessing that many of you cut your teeth in this area by attending a workshop given by Chuck Berlin or Jack Katz. Since Ettore's chapter, we've learned a lot—not only concerning the diagnosis of auditory processing disorders, but also regarding treatment and intervention strategies.

Dr. Dr. Gus Mueller Page Ten Editor. Auditory processing disorders: can they be treated? Introduction A child is said to have an auditory processing disorder (APD) if she or he scores poorly on a test that asks them to detect, identify, discriminate, order, group, or localize sounds.

Auditory processing disorders: can they be treated?

An APD is thought to affect the processing of both nonspeech and speech sounds. However, the best tests for APDs use nonspeech sounds because nonauditory factors, like language exposure or language expertise, can confound responses to speech sounds [1••]. Can a child's APD be treated? To answer this question, I will first discuss who has an APD, how APD is treated, and how APD treatments should be tested. Auditory processing disorders: It's not just kids who have them. 1 We're always hearing and reading about auditory processing disorders (APD) in children.

Auditory processing disorders: It's not just kids who have them.

Are you suggesting that APD can also occur in adults? It certainly can. As a matter of fact, the first recognized cases of APD were probably adults, even if they weren't labeled that at the time. (Central) auditory processing disorders: Overview and amplif... : The Hearing Journal. Central auditory processing disorder (CAPD) is defined as “a deficit in the perceptual processing of auditory stimuli and the neurobiological activity underlying that processing.”1 (C)APD likely arises from abnormal neural representation of speech and non-speech sounds in the central auditory nervous system (CANS).

(Central) auditory processing disorders: Overview and amplif... : The Hearing Journal

This type of disorder may occur in pediatric and adult patients with normal hearing or may co-exist with, or occur secondary to, peripheral hearing loss. (C)APD may lead to difficulties in various auditory functions that are important for listening and comprehending spoken language, especially in noisy backgrounds. As such, (C)APD deficits may include difficulty with lateralization, localization, auditory discrimination, auditory pattern recognition, other temporal processing deficits, and more.1. Comorbid Auditory Processing Disorder in Developmental Dysle... : Ear and Hearing. Objective: The primary objective of this study was to investigate the extent of comorbid auditory processing disorder (APD) in a group of adults with developmental dyslexia.

Comorbid Auditory Processing Disorder in Developmental Dysle... : Ear and Hearing

An additional objective was to compare performance on auditory tasks to results from standardized tests of reading in an attempt to generate a clinically useful profile of developmental dyslexics with comorbid APD. Design: A group of eleven persons with developmental dyslexia and 14 age- and intelligence-matched controls participated in the study.

Behavioral audiograms, 226-Hz tympanograms, and word recognition scores were obtained binaurally from all subjects. Hearing in Time: Evoked Potential Studies of Temporal Proce... : Ear and Hearing. This article reviews the temporal aspects of human hearing as measured using the auditory evoked potentials.

Hearing in Time: Evoked Potential Studies of Temporal Proce... : Ear and Hearing

Interaural timing cues are essential to the detection and localization of sound sources. The temporal envelope of a sound—how it changes in amplitude over time—is crucially important for speech perception. Time is taken to integrate, identify, and dissolve auditory streams. Hearing Matters: For Reading Development, Auditory Processi... : The Hearing Journal. Kraus, Nina PhD; Anderson, Samira AuD, PhD Author Information Author Information Dr.

Hearing Matters: For Reading Development, Auditory Processi... : The Hearing Journal

Kraus (left) is professor of auditory neuroscience at Northwestern University, investigating the neurobiology underlying speech and music perception and learning-associated brain plasticity. Dr. As audiologists, we understand the important role hearing sensitivity plays in the development of reading skills. The accurate representation of speech sounds is an important aspect of learning to link sounds with orthographic symbols, a fundamental building block of reading (Proc Nat Acad Sci U S A 2010;107[17]:7939-7944 ). Furthermore, if a child is not making sound-to-meaning connections in language, then efficient, automatic representation of sound by the auditory system will not develop. Is evaluating auditory processing disorders in your scope of... : The Hearing Journal. 1 How did you become interested in auditory processing disorders, and are you surprised at the growth of interest in the subject?

Is evaluating auditory processing disorders in your scope of... : The Hearing Journal

Many years ago, after hearing a presentation by Jack Willeford at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Convention, I became interested in auditory processing disorders (APD) and began to read about and investigate the topic. In the early days, there was much controversy over APD, especially from speech-language pathologists, who believed that all auditory processing disorders were simply language disorders. Since then we have come a long way in developing an understanding of auditory processing and its disorders. As we have come to understand APD better, I am not surprised that interest in the subject has grown. What does surprise me is how slow our progress has been. It takes a team to differentially diagnose APD : The Hearing Journal. Chermak, Gail D.

It takes a team to differentially diagnose APD : The Hearing Journal

PhD Section Editor(s): Musiek, Frank E. PhD Abstract. Moving toward evidence‐based diagnosis and management of APD... : The Hearing Journal. 1 Conducting testing for central auditory processing disorders (CAPD) seems to be more a part of mainstream audiology practice these days than it used to be.

Moving toward evidence‐based diagnosis and management of APD... : The Hearing Journal

Is that true? I don't want to start this discussion off by sounding picky, but the preferred terminology now is “auditory processing disorders” or (“APD”) without the “central” or the “C”. The “central” was dropped about 7 years ago because research clearly shows that deficits in auditory processing can occur anywhere in the auditory system—from the cochlear to the cortex.

But you're correct; APD is becoming a household word—or acronym—nowadays. As evidence of this, I refer you to a recent position statement on auditory processing disorders.1 After you take a look at this you'll see lots of justification for the renewed professional and public attention to APD. 2 So, why are we hearing more about APD now than in the past? 3 I'm not quite as old as you. Okay. 5 I'm getting the point. Yes, there were. But wait—there's more. Sure. Reading disorders and dyslexia : Current Opinion in Pediatrics. Definition and prevalence Developmental dyslexia is the most widely used term for children who experience severe difficulties in learning to decode print. Children with dyslexia find it hard to recognize printed words, have great difficulties ‘sounding out’ unfamiliar words, and often also read slowly. In European languages, which have more regular writing systems than English, the main symptoms of dyslexia are poor reading fluency and spelling but the predictors of reading (and dyslexia) are the same, namely letter knowledge, phoneme awareness and rapid naming (RAN) skills [1].

It is important to emphasize that reading skills, like many other human characteristics (e.g., weight, blood pressure) show a continuous distribution in the population. As such, the criteria used for diagnosis are to some extent arbitrary (just as for obesity or hypertension). Risk factors for dyslexia The findings of family risk studies also show that single deficit accounts of dyslexia are inadequate. None. 1. Temporal Auditory and Visual Motion Processing of Children D... : Ear and Hearing.