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Integrating technology in the classroom. Studies show that students succeed with digital learning, but making the transition from text book to tablet has its challenges. As students across the country dive into a new school year, ready to hit the proverbial books, many find themselves swiping screens instead of flipping pages as districts ramp up tech programs.

Laptops, tablets, software and apps. These are the tools of learning in the 21st century, the paper and ink of the next generation. These essential skills include communication, critical thinking, problem solving, collaboration, and, of course, digital literacy. "Technology can be an invaluable tool for teachers to engage students and to enhance the learning process," says Paige Johnson, education strategist for Intel and an expert in guiding school systems along the technology adoption curve. Benefits of Effective Tech Integration Kids are drawn to technology. Clearly, technology offers tremendous potential to engage students in learning. Some benefits: Evidence of Success. 33 Digital Tools for Advancing Formative Assessment in the Classroom. I came across a great blog post the other day – Formative Assessments Are Easier Than You Think – that told the firsthand account of a teacher, Steven Anderson, who implemented formative assessment in his classroom.

He used a sticky-note version of an exit ticket to elicit evidence of student learning and in his words, “what a difference that made.” Formative assessment is ‘easier than you think’ and with all the digital tools and apps now available for mobile devices it’s even easier. We’ve shared some digital tools before and with the five tools that Steven shared combined with our earlier suggestions there are now 33 digital tools that we’ve uncovered that are free or inexpensive and help teachers implement formative assessment in their classrooms. Here they are: A few of Steven’s discoveries: Lino – A virtual corkboard of sticky-notes so students can provide questions or comments on their learning. These can be used like exit tickets or during the course of a lesson.

Pick Me! Using Smartphones in the Classroom | NEA #edtechbc. By Edward Graham Found in: Advice and Support Ken Halla knows a thing or two about using technology in the classroom. For the past 5 years, the 22-year teaching veteran has worked to transition his ninth-grade World History and AP Government classrooms into a mobile device-friendly environment where students can incorporate the latest technology into the learning process. Along the way, Halla created three of the most used education blogs in the country—“World History Teachers Blog,” “US Government Teachers Blog,” and “US History Teachers Blog”—to help fellow humanities teachers incorporate more technology and more device-based learning into their own classrooms.

“Not every classroom can get a laptop every day, so [devices like smartphones], even if you have to pair up, become something useful for teachers,” Halla says. “The number of kids with phones has just been blown out of the water the last couple of years,” he adds. Ensuring it stays academic Apps for the social sciences. How and Why to Start Blogging in the Classroom | GDCF. What does blogging in the classroom look like? Generally the teacher sets up a main page, and initially writes the main content of the blog, allowing and encouraging kids to comment. As kids show the appropriate skills in commenting, they eventually get to write and publish their own blogs within the class blog. What are different kinds of blogs out there? Teacher blogsProfessionalEducationalTeacher blogs with student bloggersClass managementEducational When it comes to blogging in the classroom, the teacher is mostly responsible for the main content with students contributing blogs of their own when they are ready.

It’s a good idea to ensure students have agreed to some framework of guidelines for classroom blogging. What’s the Purpose of Blogging in the Classroom? The class blog is a main gathering place to chat about the class outside of class, and to capture snapshots of the school year via various forms of media. Here are some more benefits to blogging in the classroom: Smartphones in the classroom: a teacher's dream or nightmare? Another CBC News Story. When students return to class this fall, a majority of them will be toting something that teachers themselves are still learning to deal with: a mobile device. Whether it's a smartphone, tablet or laptop, survey after survey shows more and more — and younger and younger — schoolchildren have their own computing devices and are taking them to class. A report last year found that just among Grade 4 students, 25 per cent had a cellphone; for high school students, close to 90 per cent have smartphones.

School districts once tried to fight the trend. The Toronto District School Board, Canada's largest, banned cellphone use in class from 2007 to 2011. New York City had a cellphone-in-school ban for years. But most have relented, figuring it's impossible to police possession of the ubiquitous devices, and better to try to incorporate them into the curriculum. 'Kids spend most of their time free from school in the 21st century using technology,' English teacher Robert Costanzo says. Distraction. 10 Tips For Smarter iPad Use In The Classroom | Te@chThought. Unlocking The Learning Potential Of The iPad by Terry Heick The iPad. Pop culture’s plaything and #edtech’s (somewhat dimming?) Neon sign. It’s an app library, a media consumption device, and a mobile learning tool that makes yesterday’s graphing calculators, smartboards, and laptops look like abacuses.

So we buy them then—by the truckloads, in fact. We stamp them as district-owned, give teachers a few PDs that show them some tools and advise them on “district policy,” and then expect miracles. It is unclear exactly how and where we expect those miracles to show up. The local newspaper? Creating A Learning Goal To establish how we can maximize the impact of the iPad as a learning tool, we first have to establish what kind of impact we’d hope to have. In this case, we’ll settle on understanding (as troublesome a term as that might be): Students being able to think critically about chosen standards or curriculum, and apply understanding in diverse, academic and non-academic environments. 1. 2.

Coding in the Classroom: 16 Top Resources | Edudemic #cuebc. As cool as technology is, its intricacies and inner workings are sometimes intimidating, especially for young people who may be more interested in what technology can do for them rather than what they can do with technology. However, when students hurdle that obstacle and see the value of computer science — specifically coding — they gain a broadened perspective and the potential for a rewarding career in the tech field. The following resources will help you teach your students the basics of coding and will provide tips on how to keep kids interested as you go. Tools to Use in Class Can you make coding fun for your students? Absolutely! Edutopia presents a list of six resources designed to help parents get their kids interested in coding.

The Facts About Coding Teaching your students to code is important, but teaching them its practical value is also key in helping them derive the most benefit from what they learn. Dr. 5 Simple Ways To Add Movement In The Classroom. Politics In The Classroom: How Much Is Too Much? : NPR Ed. The Confederate flag. The Supreme Court ruling on gay marriage. Policing minority communities. Nuclear weapons and Iran. Summer often brings a lull in the news, but not this year. And, come September, students are going to want to talk about these headlines. But how should teachers navigate our nation's thorny politics? Do politics belong in the classroom at all, or should schools be safe havens from never-ending partisan battles?

In their book, The Political Classroom: Evidence and Ethics in Democratic Education, Diana E. Schools, they conclude, are and ought to be political places — but not partisan ones. Sometimes it seems there's a belief that schools should be political ... sort of. Hess: You're absolutely right, there are a number of schools that encourage students to get involved in political campaigns, but they tend to be political campaigns that really aren't very controversial. We have evidence that kids learn a lot from doing that. McAvoy: Right. Hess: Absolutely. 10 Ways to use Instagram in the classroom | Daily Genius. Instagram isn’t just a platform for selfies, business promotions, and cute animals. With a little creativity, you can bring the visual power of photos and videos to your classroom, weave them into your students’ learning process, and bring a little fun to their (and your!)

Days. Do you use Instagram in your classroom? How do you use it? 10 ways to use Instagram in the classroom Send classroom notifications Many teachers use other forms of social media – like Twitter and Facebook – to share classroom news and other notifications. Showcase students and student work Feature a student of the week or month, with a short bio and some tidbits about themselves and their work. Review content from class Remind your students of some things you’ve talked about in class, to keep the concepts fresh in their minds. Share reading recommendations Not all students get really excited about extracurricular reading. Track student progress over time Snap photos of student work throughout the year. Have a contest. 33 Digital Tools for Advancing Formative Assessment in the Classroom. I came across a great blog post the other day – Formative Assessments Are Easier Than You Think – that told the firsthand account of a teacher, Steven Anderson, who implemented formative assessment in his classroom.

He used a sticky-note version of an exit ticket to elicit evidence of student learning and in his words, “what a difference that made.” Formative assessment is ‘easier than you think’ and with all the digital tools and apps now available for mobile devices it’s even easier. We’ve shared some digital tools before and with the five tools that Steven shared combined with our earlier suggestions there are now 33 digital tools that we’ve uncovered that are free or inexpensive and help teachers implement formative assessment in their classrooms.

Here they are: A few of Steven’s discoveries: Lino – A virtual corkboard of sticky-notes so students can provide questions or comments on their learning. Poll Everywhere – Teachers can create a feedback poll or ask questions. Pick Me! Terrific Tales of Teachers and Twitter in the Classroom. Let’s have an honest discussion about Twitter and teachers. What makes Twitter a tool that teachers would want to use? How have teachers already used Twitter? What’s the honest feedback? There’s no better place to look than at examples of success with Twitter’s practical applications in the modern classroom. Let us pay tribute to those who have bravely blazed the trail before us. First, why would teachers use Twitter? We found Laura Wheeler chiming in about why she uses Twitter. “It took a couple of years before I really understood how to use Twitter to get what I wanted out of it.” Wheeler uses the social networking site mostly outside the classroom, not involving her students.

To get ideas for lessons and activitiesTo expand her Professional Learning Network (PLN)To wax philosophical on the bigger ideas in educationTo engage in conversations with like-minded professionalsTo be linked into opportunities for professional development Here also is Laura Knight: And now, more educators … iPads in the Classroom: The Right Questions You Should Ask. The pressure is on to make sure the education of U.S. students is on track with their global peers. Unfortunately, according to a 2015 report by Pew Research Center, that’s not the case, particularly in the areas of science and math. It’s no wonder, then, that in the quest for educational advancement, teachers want their students to have access to the newest, theories, processes and technologies to help the students excel. One of the most popular technologies has been the introduction of tablets, particularly, iPads, in the classroom.

Maybe you’ve been thinking about augmenting your program with iPads or another type of tablet. But before you and your school make a hefty investment of finances and time, consider these questions to ensure this technology is right for your purpose. Photo from Flickr via Brad Flickinger The Necessity of Asking the Right Questions Before You Invest Why Do You Need an iPad? How will it benefit you? Would the iPad support your current or desired lesson plans? Terrific Tales of Teachers and Twitter in the Classroom. 100 Ways To Use Google Drive In The Classroom. 12 Unexpected Ways to Use LEGO in the Classroom | Edudemic - LEGO Bricks are toys. They’re items that students willingly seek out to play with and get excited to receive as gifts under the Christmas tree. That’s one of the things that make them so useful to teachers. Lessons taught using LEGO Bricks don’t feel like dull schoolwork. On the contrary, students might feel like they’re getting away with something. They actually get to play with LEGO Bricks in class?

The idea that students can learn something valuable from play isn’t new, or even controversial. As such, making LEGO Bricks part of your lesson plan can help you teach concepts that students might otherwise find tedious, in a way that doesn’t feel like work to them. Using LEGO Bricks to Teach Math Visually Many students are visual learners and will have an easier time grasping mathematical concepts if they can see them demonstrated in a visually compelling way. 1. Photo courtesy of LEGO Education 2. A square piece with four studs helps students see what 2×2 looks like. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Resources to teach coding in the classroom | EdTech for AESD #edtechbc #cuebc. Coding in the Classroom: 16 Top Resources. Inquiry in the Classroom: 7 Simple Tools To Get You Started | Edudemic #edtechbc. We know certain characteristics can be encouraged, but not taught, like curiosity. But teachers who use an inquiry based approach can provide techniques that help students learn the questions to ask that may spark a natural interest. Image from Flickr via David Woo Why Use the Inquiry Cycle? Often used by science professionals to work through problems and research, an inquiry-based approach, or inquiry cycle, is also used in classrooms for scientific and non-scientific topics to encourage students during the learning process.

The Center for Inspired Teaching, an organization that provides teacher training, explains that in an inquiry-based approach, teachers help students generate their own appropriate questions and guide the investigation. The Center for Inspired Teaching says this approach helps create life-long learners by: Steps of the Inquiry Cycle Technology to Help Students with Inquiry Cycle Step 1: Assessing what is already known.

Step 2: Knowing what questions to ask. In Short. An Epic Guide to Student Engagement in the Classroom | A.J. Juliani. When I first saw this infographic (created by Dr. Roland Rios) based on Schlechty’s Levels of Engagement, it actually took me a moment to collect my thoughts. I quickly asked myself, “What the heck does student engagement even mean?” And then followed that with, “I wonder if my students actually have high attention and commitment, or are they just being strategically compliant?” Sometimes a picture can say a thousand words.

For some reason, classroom management’s connection to student engagement was not part of my discussions as an undergrad, student teacher, or even first year teacher. To be fair, I did not seek out this information myself either. I write a lot about student choice, inquiry-based learning, and how to bring innovation back into the classroom. John Spencer and I decided to devote the entire month of April to the topic of “Student Engagement” on our podcast Classroom Questions. The Classroom Questions podcast is on iTunes and Stitcher. Related Resources: Recommended Reading: How Teachers Make Cell Phones Work in the Classroom | MindShift #edtechbc. Do mobile devices in the classroom really improve learning outcomes? #edtechbc. How Video Games In The Classroom Will Make Students Smarter #edtechbc. 12 Tips to Manage Time and Increase Efficiency in the Classroom! | Teacher's Gazette #bclearns. A Brief History of Calculators in the Classroom (From the days when they were banned)

60 Ways to Use Twitter in the Classroom by Category | Global Digital Citizen Foundation #edtechbc. 7 Tips For Getting Started With Mindfulness In The Classroom. Social Media in the Classroom: 16 Best Resources for 2015 | Edudemic #edtechbc. 80 plus ideas for using iPad in the classroom #appaday. Print & Play Games: Games For Use In The Classroom. Using Digital Tablets: Technology in the Classroom | TeachHUB #edtechbc. "What Does Awesome Look Like?" A Free Teacher Activity Book for iPads in the Classroom #edtechbc. How Twitter in the Classroom Connects Your Students. How to Use Crowdsourcing in the Classroom | The Future of Learning #edtechbc. 7 Ways to Use Digital Photography in The Classroom | We Are Teachers #edtechbc. How to Use Social Media as a Learning Tool in the Classroom | Edudemic #edtechbc. 8 EdTech Hacks: A Cheat Sheet for Interactive Classroom Collaboration.