background preloader

CARNIVORE'S DILEMMA

Facebook Twitter

Should I Eat Meat - Health Dilemma. Should I Eat Meat - Feeding the Planet. Denmark ethics council calls for tax on red meat to fight 'ethical problem' of climate change. Denmark is considering proposals to introduce a tax on red meat, after a government think tank came to the conclusion that “climate change is an ethical problem”.

Denmark ethics council calls for tax on red meat to fight 'ethical problem' of climate change

The Danish Council of Ethics recommended an initial tax on beef, with a view to extending the regulation to all red meats in future. It said that in the long term, the tax should apply to all foods at varying levels depending on climate impact. The world pays too high a price for cheap meat. What’s your beef?

The world pays too high a price for cheap meat

(Image: Mikael Andersson/Plainpicture) Health worries won’t curtail the growing global appetite for meat – perhaps environmental concerns will be more persuasive NOT long ago, a meal centred on meat was a rare treat. No longer. Most of us in the West now eat meat every day; many consume it at every meal. The problem, setting aside issues around the morality of eating animals, is that the planet cannot support this growing appetite. Farmageddon - the true cost of cheap meat. How much your meat addiction is hurting the planet. Less is more.

How much your meat addiction is hurting the planet

(Kiyoshi Ota/Bloomberg News) The environment doesn't appreciate our meat obsession. The average meat-eater in the U.S. is responsible for almost twice as much global warming as the average vegetarian, and close to three times that of the average vegan, according to a study (pdf) published this month in the journal Climatic Change. The study, which was carried out at Oxford University, surveyed the diets of some 60,000 individuals (more than 2,000 vegans, 15,000 vegetarians, 8,000 fish-eaters, and nearly 30,000 meat-eaters). Heavy meat-eaters were defined as those who consume more than 3.5 ounces of meat per day—making the average American meat-eater (who consumes roughly four ounces per day) a heavy meat-eater.

The difference found in diet-driven carbon footprints was significant. The Vegan Who Started a Butcher Shop. When it comes to meat, the kitchen is a battlefield – and conscience is a casualty. When he was a schoolboy, the great polymath Jonathan Miller won a reputation as the finest chicken impersonator in north London.

When it comes to meat, the kitchen is a battlefield – and conscience is a casualty

The pleasure his friends and family took in his performance had encouraged him to get the linguistics absolutely right. Rival impersonators at his school were happy to make do with “buk, buk, buk, buk … bacagh” but the future satirist, actor, opera director and neuropsychologist noticed that the noise chickens made wasn’t so regular, that “chickens liked to lead you up the garden path”, as he wrote in Granta magazine in 1988. “They would lead you to expect that for every four or five ‘buks’ there would be a ‘bacagh’ … What I noticed, after prolonged examination, was an entirely different pattern of chicken speech behaviour. Carnivore’s Dilemma. In Amarillo, Texas, a patty-forming machine at a Caviness Beef Packers plant (left) cranks out 24,000 half-pound hamburger patties an hour for the restaurant trade.

Carnivore’s Dilemma

Individual Americans eat 40 percent less beef now than in the peak consumption year, 1976, but there are many more Americans. Today the United States remains the world’s largest consumer and producer of beef. If Isabella Bartol (far right) had her druthers, she’d eat a burger every day. Isabella, nine, prefers just ketchup on her cheeseburger; sister Betsy, four, puts everything on hers. At P. In Amarillo, Texas, a patty-forming machine at a Caviness Beef Packers plant (top) cranks out 24,000 half-pound hamburger patties an hour for the restaurant trade.

Study Finds Western World Must Halve Meat Consumption To Feed Global Population By 2050. Meat in a Shop Window Photo from Shutterstock It is estimated that the world’s population will reach 9.3 billion people by 2050, which raises significant questions as to how exactly we are going to feed such a massive number of people — and according to a new report from the University of Exeter, the answer is to eat less meat.

Study Finds Western World Must Halve Meat Consumption To Feed Global Population By 2050

The researchers also recommend that we recycle our waste and increase the efficiency of our farming processes, but to make a substantial enough difference the world needs to reduce its average global meat consumption from 16.6% to 15 % of average daily calorie intake. For much of the Western world, that translates into a 50 percent reduction in meat consumption. Animal agriculture is choking the ​Earth and making us sick. We must act now. Our collective minds are stuck on this idea that talking about food’s environmental impact risks taking something very intimate away from us.

Animal agriculture is choking the ​Earth and making us sick. We must act now

In fact it’s just the opposite. Reconsidering how we eat offers us hope, and empowers us with choice over what our future planet will look like. And we can ask our local leaders – from city mayors to school district boards to hospital management – to help, by widening our food options. On Monday and Tuesday, the city of Chicago is hosting a summit for the Global Covenant of Mayors for Climate and Energy to discuss climate solutions cities can undertake. Strategies to address and lower food’s impact should be front and center. George Monbiot: hills are 'sheep-wrecked' and in danger. Animals farmed: welcome to our series. There has been a revolution in the way we produce and consume meat and fish.

Animals farmed: welcome to our series

Chicken, beef, pork or salmon were once rare Sunday-at-best luxuries. Now billions of people around the world can afford to eat fish and meat daily. Intensive farming has made this possible: the realisation that money could be saved – and prices driven down – by increasing the scale of production, and reducing exposure to what were once seen as essential components of farming, such as sunshine, quality of life for the animals, space and natural grazing.

A new artificial lifecycle was introduced instead: electric lights to simulate day and night, heating systems to simulate seasons, intensively selective breeding to speed up growth and fattening. Livestock's long shadow: environmental issues and options. Avoiding meat and dairy is ‘single biggest way’ to reduce your impact on Earth. Avoiding meat and dairy products is the single biggest way to reduce your environmental impact on the planet, according to the scientists behind the most comprehensive analysis to date of the damage farming does to the planet.

Avoiding meat and dairy is ‘single biggest way’ to reduce your impact on Earth

The new research shows that without meat and dairy consumption, global farmland use could be reduced by more than 75% – an area equivalent to the US, China, European Union and Australia combined – and still feed the world. Loss of wild areas to agriculture is the leading cause of the current mass extinction of wildlife. The new analysis shows that while meat and dairy provide just 18% of calories and 37% of protein, it uses the vast majority – 83% – of farmland and produces 60% of agriculture’s greenhouse gas emissions.

Other recent research shows 86% of all land mammals are now livestock or humans. i3437e03.