Hardcore Punk

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Oi! Oi! is a subgenre of punk rock that originated in the United Kingdom in the late 1970s.[1] The music and its associated subculture had the goal of bringing together punks, skinheads and other working-class youth. [2][3] History[edit] The prevalent ideology of the original Oi! movement was a rough brand of working-class rebellion. Lyrical topics included unemployment, workers' rights, harassment by police and other authorities, and oppression by the government.[4] Oi! Oi!
Anarcho-punk is punk rock that promotes anarchism. The term anarcho-punk is sometimes applied exclusively to bands that were part of the original anarcho-punk movement in the United Kingdom in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Some use the term more broadly to refer to any punk or rock music with anarchist lyrical content, including crust punk, d-beat, folk punk, hardcore punk, garage punk or ska punk. History[edit] Crass in 1984. Crass played a major role in introducing anarchism to the punk subculture. Anarcho-Punk Anarcho-Punk
Riot Grrrl History[edit] Origins[edit] During the early 1990s the Seattle/Olympia Washington area had a sophisticated Do it yourself infrastructure.[5] Young women involved in underground music scenes took advantage of this to articulate their feminist thoughts and desires through creating punk-rock fanzines and forming garage bands. The political model of collage-based, photocopied handbills and booklets was already used by the punk movement as a way to activate underground music, leftist politics and alternative (to mainstream) sub-cultures. Riot Grrrl
Queercore Queercore Queercore (or Homocore) is a cultural and social movement that began in the mid-1980s as an offshoot of punk. It is distinguished by its discontent with society in general, and specifically society's disapproval of the gay, bisexual, lesbian and transgender communities.[1] Queercore expresses itself in a DIY style through zines, music, writing, art and film. As a musical genre, it may be distinguished by lyrics exploring themes of prejudice and dealing with issues such as sexual identity,[2] gender identity and the rights of the individual; more generally bands offer a critique of society endemic to their position within it, sometimes in a light-hearted way, sometimes seriously. Musically, many queercore bands originated in the punk scene but the industrial music culture has been influential as well. Queercore groups encompass many genres such as hardcore punk, synthpunk, indie rock, power pop, No Wave, noise, experimental, industrial and others. History[edit]
Emo /ˈiːmoʊ/ is a style of rock music characterized by melodic musicianship and expressive, often confessional lyrics. It originated in the mid-1980s hardcore punk movement of Washington, D.C., where it was known as "emotional hardcore" or "emocore" and pioneered by bands such as Rites of Spring and Embrace. As the style was echoed by contemporary American punk rock bands, its sound and meaning shifted and changed, blending with pop punk and indie rock and encapsulated in the early 1990s by groups such as Jawbreaker and Sunny Day Real Estate. By the mid-1990s numerous emo acts emerged from the Midwestern and Central United States, and several independent record labels began to specialize in the style. Emo Emo