Self Improvement

Facebook Twitter

Our-Discussion.jpg (719×935) Getting To Done: Roll Your Own Business - Lifehacker. By Keith Robinson "Bootstrapping", when it comes to starting your own business, refers to getting yourself up and running with as little outside help as possible.

Getting To Done: Roll Your Own Business - Lifehacker

This means not borrowing much (if any) money, not taking on outside investment and relying solely on your own skills, money and efforts to get things done. It can be a hard row to hoe, and you can count on quite a few bumps along the way, but for certain types of businesses it can also be really attractive and the rewards can be amazing. As an entrepreneur that's right in the middle of bootstrapping my own business together, I've got a bit of experience and I'm learning more and more every day.

I thought it might be interesting to share some tips and some of the lessons I've learned so far. Make sure it's right. Before you set out to fund your own business you need to really think about if it's right for you. Have some money in the bank. Anytime you're going into business on your own you'll want to have some reserves saved up. D. Where Will You Be in Five Years? - Amy Gallo - Best Practices. Most people have been asked that perennial, and somewhat annoying, question: “Where do you see yourself in five years?”

Where Will You Be in Five Years? - Amy Gallo - Best Practices

Of course it is asked most often in a job interview, but it may also come up in a conversation at a networking event or a cocktail party. Knowing and communicating your career goals is challenging for even the most ambitious and focused person. Can you really know what job you’ll be doing, or even want to be doing, in five years? What the Experts Say In today’s work world, careers take numerous twists and turns and the future is often murky.

“Five years, in today’s environment, is very hard to predict. The first step is knowing the answer for yourself. Be introspective Figuring out the answer to this question is not an easy task. What are my values? This type of contemplation can help you set a professional vision for the next five years. If you don’t know, admit it Even the deepest soul-searching may not yield a definitive plan for you. Principles to Remember Do: Don’t: Task Boxes. Mind Sweep. Throughout the month of December, The Simple Dollar is posting a daily series focusing on specific activities you can do right now to set the stage for a great 2011.

Mind Sweep

Out with the old, in with the new. 10. Do a mind sweep. Hot on the heels of the ongoing discussion of Making It All Work, I’m going to suggest a good old fashioned “mind sweep” as a brilliant way to get your financial and personal house in order to finish out the year. What’s a “Mind Sweep”? Why is it such a big distraction? For starters, think about how your mind works when you’re focused on a task.

More importantly, doing this makes you into a more reliable person. One of my own examples of a “forgotten” thing, for example, tends to be bills, mostly because many of them are billed electronically and some of them don’t let me know that they’re due. Doing a Mind Sweep So, how do you actually go about this? I suggest having a good chunk of time set aside before even starting. Get it all out of your head and onto paper.