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AP Biology Readings

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Cookies are Not Accepted - New York Times. Just how smart is an octopus? Callum Roberts is a professor of marine conservation at the University of York in Britain and the author of “The Ocean of Life: The Fate of Man and the Sea.”

Just how smart is an octopus?

Harry Potter-loving scientists find spider that looks like the Sorting Hat, naming it Eriovixia gryffindori. E. gryffindori, a newly discovered spider species in southwest India.

Harry Potter-loving scientists find spider that looks like the Sorting Hat, naming it Eriovixia gryffindori

Swarming crazy ants with a penchant for destroying electronics are on the move in Texas. This sea slug steals plant genes to live like a leaf. How black widow mothers control their children’s cannibalism. Mother knows best.

How black widow mothers control their children’s cannibalism

(Laurence Grayson via Flickr/Creative Commons) Being a mother has its challenges, particularly when your young have a habit of eating their siblings. But black widow spiders desperate to keep some house order may stop their offspring from indulging in cannibalism — by putting them on an even playing field. Without maternal intervention, “the offspring might turn on each other and start eating other, because that's what spiders do,”says Chadwick Johnson, a biology professor at Arizona State University and the lead author of a recent study on black widows published in Animal Behavior.

Dear Science: How many germs are actually on a toilet seat — and should I care? (Rachel Orr/The Washington Post) Dear Science: Now and then health awareness articles use the attention-grabbing statistic "XYZ has more germs on it than a toilet seat!

Dear Science: How many germs are actually on a toilet seat — and should I care?

" How to feed a happy, healthy gut. If you ever feel like it’s you against the world, consider how your gut microbiota feels.

How to feed a happy, healthy gut

Your genes and your environment interact constantly, and your gut is the largest meeting point. On security duty is your microbiota, the collection of about 100 trillion bacteria and other microbes that live in your intestines, especially your large intestine (the colon). How, and Why, to Hunt the Red-Spotted Newt. Not that anyone really needs a reason.

How, and Why, to Hunt the Red-Spotted Newt

Could Alzheimer’s Stem From Infections? It Makes Sense, Experts Say. Fruits and vegetables used to look so different you might not even recognize them. Humans have been genetically manipulating fruits and vegetables for thousands of years through selective cultivation.

Fruits and vegetables used to look so different you might not even recognize them

Once we started cultivating wild plants, fruits and vegetables got a lot more colorful. (Daron Taylor,Dani Johnson,Osman Malik/The Washington Post) These days, we take the way our fruits and vegetables look for granted. First giraffe genome reveals the oddity behind an African icon. The giraffe is an oddball, both outside and in.

First giraffe genome reveals the oddity behind an African icon

By sequencing the giraffe’s genome for the first time, researchers have learned that the animal’s extraordinary external features are matched by wild genetic traits buried inside its cells. The genome unveils clues into how the giraffe developed its imposing stature, but also may lead the team to genetically engineer animals to carry the same features. Picture mice with long necks or absurdly strong hearts. Such research may guide future treatments for bone disorders, cardiovascular disease or cancer. A giraffe’s juggernaut heart creates 2.5 times the blood pressure seen in humans and other mammals. Eske Willerslev Is Rewriting History With DNA. But there was no one in Denmark doing that research, so one of Dr.

Eske Willerslev Is Rewriting History With DNA

Willerslev’s professors suggested a Plan B. They could investigate ancient ice that climate researchers at the University of Copenhagen had brought back from Greenland. Dr. Willerslev and a fellow graduate student, Anders J. Hansen, set up a room where they could search for DNA in the ice cores. Photo The results were so remarkable for the mid-1990s that NASA called the young doctoral student to ask about his methods. “I got completely convinced that I wanted to become a scientist,” Dr. After publishing the ice study in 1999, Dr. Unraveling the Orchid Mantis Mystery. Why Science Majors Change Their Minds (It’s Just So Darn Hard)

LAST FALL, President Obama threw what was billed as the first White House Science Fair, a photo op in the gilt-mirrored State Dining Room.

Why Science Majors Change Their Minds (It’s Just So Darn Hard)

He tested a steering wheel designed by middle schoolers to detect distracted driving and peeked inside a robot that plays soccer. It was meant as an inspirational moment: children, science is fun; work harder. Politicians and educators have been wringing their hands for years over test scores showing American students falling behind their counterparts in Slovenia and Singapore. How will the United States stack up against global rivals in innovation? The president and industry groups have called on colleges to graduate 10,000 more engineers a year and 100,000 new teachers with majors in STEM — science, technology, engineering and math. Scientists Unveil New ‘Tree of Life’ A team of scientists unveiled a new tree of life on Monday, a diagram outlining the evolution of all living things. The researchers found that bacteria make up most of life’s branches. And they found that much of that diversity has been waiting in plain sight to be discovered, dwelling in river mud and meadow soils.

“It is a momentous discovery — an entire continent of life-forms,” said Eugene V. Koonin of the National Center for Biotechnology Information, who was not involved in the study. The study was published in the journal Nature Microbiology. Zika’s structure has been revealed, bringing scientists closer to a vaccine.

U.S. researchers have succeeded in getting details of the Zika virus's surface. The findings could help scientists eventually develop a vaccine for the virus. (Claritza Jimenez/The Washington Post) Zika, the mosquito-borne virus linked to microcephaly in the fetuses of infected women, just lost a little bit of its edge to researchers. On Thursday, a Purdue University team published the virus's structure for the first time in the journal Science. Invasive Species Aren’t Always Unwanted.

Photo are bad news, or so goes the conventional wisdom, encouraged by persistent warnings from biologists about the dangers of foreign animals and plants moving into new territories. Conservation organizations bill alien species as the foremost threat to native wildlife. Seas Are Rising at Fastest Rate in Last 28 Centuries. Seas Are Rising at Fastest Rate in Last 28 Centuries. Why a top food poisoning expert won’t ever eat these foods. Evelyn Witkin and the Road to DNA Enlightenment. Photo. Scientists Hope to Bring a Galápagos Tortoise Species Back to Life.

Photo. The Power Plants That Can Reverse Climate Change — NOVA Next. The Kissing Bug Spreads Disease In Latin America. Is It Spreading To The U.S. As Well? : Goats and Soda. Closing In on Where Eels Go to Connect. Photo. Surprisingly good news for the Earth’s climate: Greenhouse gas pollution dropped this year. (AP/Anupam Nath) Emissions of man-made greenhouse gases appear to have declined slightly in 2015, scientists said Monday, reflecting what experts say is an encouraging, though likely temporary, pause in the steady rise in pollutants blamed for climate change.

In honor of #WorldToiletDay, here are our favorite stories about poop. The FDA just approved the nation’s first genetically-engineered animal: A salmon that grows twice as fast. Five myths about the common cold. Giant rats as big as dachshunds and weighing 11 pounds? More Than Half of Entire Species of Saigas Gone in Mysterious Die-Off. Exxon Mobil Under Investigation in New York Over Climate Statements. Greenland Is Melting Away. New Species of Galápagos Tortoise Is Identified. Why scientists are worried about the ice shelves of Antarctica. These ancient Chinese teeth could rewrite human history. The first ancient African genome reveals complex human migrations. In the eerie emptiness of Chernobyl’s abandoned towns, wildlife is flourishing. Who dies and who survives during a mass extinction? A tantalizing clue. Bozemanscience.