Robotics

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Festo Corporate - Bionic Learning Network Festo Corporate - Bionic Learning Network Highlight of the Bionic Learning Network 2014: the BionicKangaroo Learning from nature: in the Bionic Learning Network, a cooperation between Festo and renowned universities, institutes and development companies, principles from nature provide inspiration for technical applications and industrial practice. Energy-efficient jumping based on a natural model
Robots Are the Next Revolution, So Why Isn't Anyone Acting Like It? Robots Are the Next Revolution, So Why Isn't Anyone Acting Like It? This robot can fetch you a beer. But it will cost you $400,000. Back in 2006, when Bill Gates was making his tear-filled transition from the PC industry into a tear-filled career as a philanthropist, he penned an editorial on robotics that became a rallying cry for… no one. Titled "A Robot in Every Home," Bill Gates highlighted the obvious parallels between the pre-Microsoft PC industry and the pre-anybody personal robotics industry.
News: MLD Test Moves Navy a Step Closer to Lasers for Ship Self-Defense - Office of Naval Research For Immediate Release: April 8, 2011 By Geoff S. Fein, Office of Naval Research News: MLD Test Moves Navy a Step Closer to Lasers for Ship Self-Defense - Office of Naval Research
5 Axis Robot Carves Metal Like Butter (Video The speed and precision of modern industrial machining robots puts humans to shame. Industrial robots are getting precise enough that they’re less like dumb machines and more like automated sculptors producing artwork. Case in point: Daishin’s Seki 5-axis mill. The Japanese company celebrated its 50th anniversary last year by using this machine to carve out a full scale motorcycle helmet out of one piece of aluminum. No breaks, no joints, the 5-Axis mill simply pivots and rotates to carve metal at some absurd angles. 5 Axis Robot Carves Metal Like Butter (Video
Machines will achieve human-level intelligence in the 2028 to 2150 range: poll Machines will achieve human-level intelligence in the 2028 to 2150 range: poll How similar will machine intelligence be to human intelligence? (credit: A. Sandberg & N. Bostrom/Future of Humanity Institute) Machines will achieve human-level intelligence by 2028 (median estimate: 10% chance), by 2050 (median estimate: 50% chance), or by 2150 (median estimate: 90% chance), according to an informal poll at the Future of Humanity Institute (FHI) Winter Intelligence conference on machine intelligence in January. “Human‐level machine intelligence, whether due to a de novo AGI (artificial general intelligence) or biologically inspired/emulated systems, has a macroscopic probability to occurring mid‐century,” the report authors, Dr.
Imagine a swarm of microrobots—tiny devices a few hair widths across—swimming through your blood vessels and repairing damage, or zipping around in computer chips as a security lock, or quickly knitting together heart tissue. Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, Dartmouth College, and Duke University have shown how to use a single electrical signal to command a group of microrobots to self-assemble into larger structures. The researchers hope to use this method to build biological tissues. But for microrobots to do anything like that, researchers must first figure out a good way to control them. “When things are very small, they tend to stick together,” says Jason Gorman, a robotics researcher in the Intelligent Systems Division at NIST who co-organizes an annual microrobotics competition that draws groups from around the world. “A lot of the locomotion methods that have been developed are focused on overcoming or leveraging this adhesion.” Herding Swarms of Microrobots Herding Swarms of Microrobots