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University of Oxford - Academia.edu. The concept of a learning transition is increasingly being used in higher education to identify key stages such as the first year undergraduate experience and progression from undergraduate to postgraduate study.

University of Oxford - Academia.edu

This... more abstractThe concept of a learning transition is increasingly being used in higher education to identify key stages such as the first year undergraduate experience and progression from undergraduate to postgraduate study. More Info: • Scott, D., Hughes, G., Evans, C., Burke, P. -J., Walter, C. and Watson, D. Plagiarism Game - Snowden Library. WiseMapping - What is WiseMapping ? Storytelling Tools - Creating a Digital Narrative Story - Grade 6-7. Where To Find Legally Free Reference Photos For Your Art - Part 2 of 2. Free HD Photos. Create colorful QR Codes. QR Code Generator: QR Stuff Free Online QR Code Generator And Creator For Brochures, Print Advertising, Business Cards & Stickers.

What is Plagiarism? — Plagiarism.org - Best Practices for Ensuring Originality in Written Work. Many people think of plagiarism as copying another's work or borrowing someone else's original ideas.

What is Plagiarism? — Plagiarism.org - Best Practices for Ensuring Originality in Written Work

But terms like "copying" and "borrowing" can disguise the seriousness of the offense: According to the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary, to "plagiarize" means to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one's ownto use (another's production) without crediting the sourceto commit literary theftto present as new and original an idea or product derived from an existing source In other words, plagiarism is an act of fraud. It involves both stealing someone else's work and lying about it afterward. But can words and ideas really be stolen? According to U.S. law, the answer is yes. All of the following are considered plagiarism: Most cases of plagiarism can be avoided, however, by citing sources. What about images, videos, and music? Using an image, video or piece of music in a work you have produced without receiving proper permission or providing appropriate citation is plagiarism.

Legal images for EFL classes (and Blog posts) - ABCDelt. When you are creating your own materials (or simply supplementing a Coursebook) it can be really useful to use an image to enhance the material or create and activity for students. Thanks to the internet it isn’t hard to find a great image to use, but if you just do a normal google search you could be breaking the law by using those images. Below are a few useful resources for great quality images which you can use in your materials, or even in a blog post. Internet Plagiarism: A Teacher’s Combat Guide – CITE Journal. Have you ever sat down to grade a student’s paper and wondered, ‘Where in the world did this come from?

Internet Plagiarism: A Teacher’s Combat Guide – CITE Journal

I know Suzy Sleepalot did not write this paper.’ Educators across the country are facing the dilemma of plagiarism more and more. To combat plagiarism, teachers need to know what it is, the strategies to detect it, and the ways to prevent it. What Is Plagiarism? Plagiarism ‘refers to the presentation or submission of the work of another, without citation or credits, as your own work’ (University of Northern British Columbia, 1997, p. 1). Submitting another student’s paper with or without that student’s knowledge.Copying a paper or paraphrasing information from a text without proper documentation.Purchasing and turning in a paper from a peer, research service, or term paper mill.Downloading and submitting a paper from a ‘free term paper’ Web site (Hinchliffe, 1998). For an extensive list of term paper mills, visit Coastal Carolina University’s list of Internet Term Paper Sites at . Legal images for EFL classes (and Blog posts) - ABCDelt.

#boat. How to get Copyright Free Images – Teacher Phili. Search: boat. Copyrights or Copy Wrongs?? Internet Plagiarism: A Teacher’s Combat Guide – CITE Journal. Turnitin : Results : Plagiarism Spectrum. QR codes: A treasure hunt. Here’s another classroom idea for using mobile devices and QR codes.

QR codes: A treasure hunt

It’s a simple idea, based around the concept of a treasure or scavenger hunt, where students need to find specific information in various locations. In this case, my international students in the UK all had smartphones, but not 3G connections. This meant we had to rely on the school’s Wi-Fi network, and the location of the activity was limited to the school building itself. Here’s how the activity worked: Before class 1 I prepared 10 questions based on various locations around the school. Intro to QR Codes: A lesson for EFL students. I’m currently in Cambridge in the UK, doing two weeks of EFL classroom teaching. Because… I wanted to get back into the language classroom for an intensive period with a group of language students. Create QR Code - Visualead. Digital Tools Series - Wideo. 7 ways you can use technology to engage with students – Resources for English Language Learners and Teachers.

QR Code Generator. Glogster: Multimedia Posters. File Formats Overview. This is an introduction and reference to the file formats that are available for saving image captures in Snagit.

File Formats Overview

This tutorial doesn't go in depth on each format; instead, the goal is to introduce the strengths and weaknesses of each format to help you make informed decisions when choosing a file format. The SNAG file format is used to store Snagit projects with unflattened vector objects and an undo history. This is the only format that allows you to edit vector objects like arrows and callouts after saving. SNAG files can't be viewed outside of Snagit, making this file format unsuitable for sharing or displaying images. It is, however, the best format for archiving captures (and is the format used behind the scenes when Snagit autosaves your captures in the Library). Tip: It's often useful to save a copy of your image in the SNAG file format as well as your chosen final file format in case you need to make changes later. The 1-minute guide to Internet copyright, Creative Commons, and ‘fair use’

Image by cleandesu This 1-minute guide (briefly) explores the areas of Internet copyright, Creative Commons, and ‘fair use’ for teachers.

The 1-minute guide to Internet copyright, Creative Commons, and ‘fair use’

It follows on from my previous post – The 1-minute guide to plagiarism. Copyright and the Internet Contrary to what many of us may think – and the way many of our students may behave – you can’t just use anything you find on the Internet in any way you like. Take the example of online images. TinyURL.com - shorten that long URL into a tiny URL.

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