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ReBurbia. MAP. Food and the Shape of Cities. Edible Geography Dwell : This weekend you kick off The Foodprint Project with Foodprint NYC. How did the project take shape and how will it evolve, both this weekend and in the future? I have always been interested in helping to change the way people understand or see something. For me, food is an incredibly powerful tool for connecting seemingly disparate issues. It is a magical lens that allows you to see the landscape in a different way. Food has always been a personal passion of mine, but it was only in the last couple of years that I started integrating it into my writing and my interest in design.

Foodprint NYC was conceived as the start of a larger, multi-city project, but we don’t necessarily know what shape that will ultimately take. Speaking of mapping projects, your second panel on Saturday, entitled Culinary Cartography, will ask what can be learned by mapping New York City with food as the metric. This panel is key to why we started this project.

Flooded London 2030. [Image: From "Floating City 2030: Thames Estuary Aquatic Urbanism" by Anthony Lau].

Flooded London 2030

Continuing with a look at some noteworthy student projects—which kicked off this week with thesis work by Taylor Medlin—we now look at a proposal by Anthony Lau, submitted back in 2008 at the Bartlett School of Architecture in London. For that project, Lau designed a "floating city" for the Thames Estuary, ca. 2030 A.D. This "Thames Estuary Aquatic Urbanism," as Lau refers to it, "gives new life to decommissioned ships and oil platforms by converting them into hybrid homes adapted for aquatic living.

" Foodprint Toronto. [Image: The Ontario Food Terminal; image via Pruned].

Foodprint Toronto

Foodprint Toronto is coming up fast—the afternoon of Saturday, July 31—and it will be well worth attending. Pruned has just posted an interview with the event's curators, Nicola Twilley and Sarah Rich, who explain the origins and purpose of the Foodprint series. As Nicola describes it: "The Foodprint Project is basically an exploration of the ways cities and food shape each other. So far, it's taken the form of panel discussions, one city at a time, but Sarah and I are imagining that it will gradually evolve and expand beyond that format as we go along. " Main : Tom Noonan. The Reforestation of the Thames Estuary. [Image: "The Dormant Workshop" by Tom Noonan, courtesy of the architect].

The Reforestation of the Thames Estuary

While studying at the Bartlett School of Architecture in London, recent graduate Tom Noonan produced a series of variably-sized hand-drawings to illustrate a fictional reforestation of the Thames estuary. [Image: "Log Harvest 2041" by Tom Noonan, courtesy of the architect]. Stewarding, but also openly capitalizing on, this return of woodsy nature is the John Evelyn Institute of Arboreal Science, an imaginary trade organization (of which we will read more, below).

[Image: "Reforestation of the Thames Estuary" by Tom Noonan, courtesy of the architect]. The urban scenario thus outlined—imagining a "future timber and plantation industry" stretching "throughout London, and beyond"—is like something out of Roger Deakin's extraordinary book Wildwood: A Journey Through Trees (previously described here) or even After London by Richard Jeffreys. Tempelhof Ministry of Food : LIK SAN CHAN. Tempelhof Ministry of Food 2010 ____________________________________________________________ The proposal in Berlin is the culmination of the continuous theme of Food and the community, starting from the Miracle of feeding the 5000, a mythical settlement, the Berlin Airlift, and finally the Ministry of Food.

Tempelhof Ministry of Food : LIK SAN CHAN

Tempelhof Ministry of Food is a bread and fish production community situated on the old airfield of Tempelhof Airport. The proposal is a joint venture between Edeka and the Berlin State, seeking to help Berlin's current problems of unemployment and social disparity. It aims at the idea of making the unemployed personally sustainable through producing their own food and whilst being a worker in-residence, foster a spirit of co-existence and community, which they bring back to other Berliners. Madeira Odorless Fish Market and the Tempelhof Ministry of Food. With just a few more hours left in GOOD's weeklong festival of food-writing, I thought I'd throw one more post out there: two projects by Lik San Chan.

Madeira Odorless Fish Market and the Tempelhof Ministry of Food

[Image: From the Madeira Odorless Fish Market by Lik San Chan]. The first is the Madeira Odorless Fish Market, from 2006. Camara de Lobos, Madeira, Chan explains, "is a fishing village located 10km west of the capital, Funchal. The fishing community is quickly dwindling into poverty as Funchal provides its own facilities for fish vending businesses. Camara de Lobos remains the only place in the world where the Black Scabbard fish industry can be self sustained, yet the fishermen still receive second hand pay for their catch as most of it is sold in Funchal. " [Image: Two more sections from the Madeira Odorless Fish Market by Lik San Chan]. Accordingly, the Odorless Fish Market "provides a place where their catch can be sold directly. It is a spatially self-deodorizing architecture of thermal air control.

ReBurbia. MAP. Food and the Shape of Cities. Flooded London 2030. Foodprint Toronto. Main : Tom Noonan. The Reforestation of the Thames Estuary. Tempelhof Ministry of Food : LIK SAN CHAN. Madeira Odorless Fish Market and the Tempelhof Ministry of Food. Architectural Potential Energy. [Image: From the forthcoming Pamphlet Architecture #32 by Stasus].

Architectural Potential Energy

The forthcoming Pamphlet Architecture #32, on the theme of "resilience," will be authored by Matt Ozga-Lawn and James A. Craig of Stasus, a young design firm based in Edinburgh and London. [Images: From the forthcoming Pamphlet Architecture #32 by Stasus]. The pamphlet, which will explore a series of post-industrial sites in the city of Warsaw—"a desolate area of disused freight rail tracks, commercial lots, gasometer buildings and other industrial apparatus," as the architects describe it—is more explicitly narrative than the other pamphlets that have been most recently published. "The scope and intent of our book," Stasus writes, citing such influences as Piranesi and Andrei Tarkovsky's film Stalker, "is to highlight the importance of forgotten landscapes in our cities and the potentialities that can be extracted from them. "