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The octopus can see with its skin. Octopuses are well known for changing the colour, patterning, and texture of their skin to blend into their surroundings and send signals to each other, an ability that makes them both the envy of, and inspiration for, army engineers trying to develop cloaking devices.

The octopus can see with its skin

As if that wasn’t already impressive enough, research published today in the Journal of Experimental Biology shows that octopus skin contains the pigment proteins found in eyes, making it responsive to light. These clever cephalopods can change colour thanks to specialised cells called chromatophores, which are packed in their thousands just beneath the skin surface. Each of these cells contains an elastic sac of pigmented granules surrounded by a ring of muscle, which relax or contract when commanded by nerves extending directly from the brain, making the colour inside more or less visible.

Octopuses are thought to rely mainly on vision to bring about these colour changes. Ramirez, M. Octopus ballet. Grimpoteuthis sp.

Octopus ballet

(sea-monster-ise)Royalty-free image courtesy of MBARI and The Deep: the extraordinary creatures of the abyss [Amazon UK; Amazon US]. It's not often that we get to see strange underwater creatures in action in their natural habitat. But thanks to the many advances in digital technology, we are given this rare look at a mysterious benthopelagic sea animal: Grimpoteuthis bathynectes, one in a group of 14 recognised species that are often referred to as "Dumbo octopus" because their fins resemble the large ears that the fictional character, Dumbo the elephant, used to fly. In this astonishing video, filmed 200 miles east of the coast of Oregon state, we can observe how this ghostly-white octopus moves through the inky-blackness of the deep sea: This octopus was filmed with a high-definition underwater video camera at a depth greater than 2000 metres (at 6600 feet).

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Camouflaged sea creatures are revealed in stunning detail. Images were taken by Berkshire-based photographer, Ed Brown, during his visit to the Lembeh Strait in IndonesiaThe area is well-known for muck diving, which allowed Brown to get close to the underwater creaturesOne highlight is the mysterious pygmy seahorse that is shown blending in with the fan coral it lives onOther creatures include a crinoid squat lobster, needle cuttlefish, xenia shrimp, an octopus and a painted frogfish By Ellie Zolfagharifard Published: 13:40 GMT, 5 June 2014 | Updated: 14:02 GMT, 5 June 2014 Away from human eyes, the deep ocean is a world of activity as colourful creatures sweep through icy waters in search of food.

Camouflaged sea creatures are revealed in stunning detail

But take a closer look and you’ll see a second community of critters – one that hides away in the darkness among rocks, corals and seaweed. With camouflage as their main defence, these creatures are masters of disguise, capable of transforming their colour and shape whenever danger lurks nearby. Brown was also able to capture the Halimeda ghost pipefish. Baby Sand Tiger Sharks Devour Their Siblings While Still in the Womb. VIDEO: Scientist believe they have captured the mysterious Giant Oarfish on camera for the first time. Oarfish can grow up to 50 feet long and weigh as much as 600 poundsLouisiana State University Scientists caught the elusive fish on camera in 2011 but only now published their findingsOarfish live at extreme ocean depths as much as 3,280 feet below the surface By Daily Mail Reporter Published: 00:14 GMT, 9 June 2013 | Updated: 10:25 GMT, 10 June 2013 The giant oarfish, the largest bony fish alive, has finally been caught on camera in its natural environment.

VIDEO: Scientist believe they have captured the mysterious Giant Oarfish on camera for the first time

Could the sea be conscious? Research reveals how tiny plankton behave like marine microbial 'megamind' U.S. researchers find that different forms of picoplankton react as one to environmental changesAlthough as different as humans and fungi, the creatures' behaviour was linkedFindings could help researchers understand why some species are impossible to grow in isolation.

Could the sea be conscious? Research reveals how tiny plankton behave like marine microbial 'megamind'

Japanese scientists discover sea slugs RE-GROW their penis after old one drops off after sex. Chromodoris reticulata slugs have a 'penis-in-waiting' that grows after sex First known creature that can detach its used penis before growing anotherJapanese experts' findings revealed in Royal Society journal Biology Letters By Harriet Arkell Published: 09:54 GMT, 13 February 2013 | Updated: 16:26 GMT, 13 February 2013 The first known instance of creatures growing their own 'disposable penises' has been discovered by researchers after studying the mating habits of sea slugs.

Japanese scientists discover sea slugs RE-GROW their penis after old one drops off after sex

Researchers in Japan were astonished when they realised that a group of sea slugs called Chromodoris reticulata would lose their penises after sex but then grow another one a few hours later. Marine invertebrate expert Bernard Picton, of National Museums Northern Ireland, said: 'I've never seen anything like this before.' Scroll down for video Impressive equipment: The Chromodoris reticulata, or sea slug, can grow a new penis after having sex.

The mesmerising patterns of life underwater: Amazing close-up photos show starfish as you've never seen them. Pictures taken by Russian marine biologist Alexander Semenov in the White Sea, the Red Sea and the Sea of JapanThey show starfish skin magnified between 2:1 and 2.5:1 and illuminated by underwater strobe flashThere are over 1,800 living species of starfish, also known as sea stars, occurring in all the oceans of the world By Damien Gayle Published: 11:01 GMT, 7 February 2013 | Updated: 11:03 GMT, 12 February 2013 The subjects of these mesmerising photos seem to glow with an ethereal inner luminescence that is almost out of this world.

The mesmerising patterns of life underwater: Amazing close-up photos show starfish as you've never seen them

And they are indeed from an environment that is alien to us; but it is under the sea, not above the sky, that they were captured. Monster Squid: How Discovery scientists captured the elusive Kraken on film for the very first time. Disco clam creates built-in strobe light show from mantle but California researchers don't know the reasons why. Unique animal spotted on the ocean floor near Wakatobi in IndonesiaEffect caused by reflective cells on its body By Daily Mail Reporter Published: 11:03 GMT, 17 January 2013 | Updated: 13:40 GMT, 17 January 2013.

Disco clam creates built-in strobe light show from mantle but California researchers don't know the reasons why

WoRMS - World Register of Marine Species. Biologists putting together ambitious register of sea life say a third of marine species are still unknown to science. Massive survey of marine species suggests there may as many as a different creatures living in our planet's oceansSo far only 226,000 of those have been described by biologists, with another 65,000 in specimen collections awaiting descriptionScientists expect that most of the remainder are smaller crustaceans, molluscs, worms, and sponges and will be identified by the century's end By Damien Gayle Published: 17:22 GMT, 15 November 2012 | Updated: 11:39 GMT, 16 November 2012 A third of the species that inhabit the world’s oceans may still be unknown to science, a new study suggests.

Biologists putting together ambitious register of sea life say a third of marine species are still unknown to science

And that’s despite the fact more species have been described in the last decade than in any previous one, the new report says. Give us a kiss! The turtle that urinates through its mouth... and is a delicacy in Chinese restaurants. Chinese soft-shelled turtle is the only creature to excrete through its mouthResearchers say it evolved like this to survive in brackish swamp waters By Damien Gayle Published: 11:26 GMT, 11 October 2012 | Updated: 12:35 GMT, 12 October 2012 If aliens from outer space visited our planet, they might be surprised to find that we excrete waste through our genitals - which, of course, also have a vital use in reproduction.

Give us a kiss! The turtle that urinates through its mouth... and is a delicacy in Chinese restaurants

Look At This: A Shrimp Vomits A Glowing Cloud. Research ship discovers 1.5 MILLION new species during 'health check-up' of the world's oceans. By Eddie Wrenn Published: 10:00 GMT, 26 September 2012 | Updated: 11:39 GMT, 27 September 2012 A research ship has discovered more than one million new species after trawling through the Atlantic, Pacific, Southern and Indian oceans.

The Tara Expedition took a 70,000-mile trek across the oceans over 36 months to discover the new creatures - many of which the French-based team credit with giving humanity the gift of oxygen, as the billions of tiny plankton present in our oceans provide much of the oxygen in our atmosphere. The creatures will be unveiled tonight at a special exhibition at the Science Museum in London, after the ship docked back into London last week. Monsters of the deep revealed! Sealife that live in almost complete darkness shown in crystal clear images. By Sara Malm Published: 17:05 GMT, 7 October 2012 | Updated: 08:48 GMT, 8 October 2012 The fangtooth fish, dog-faced witch eel and the deep sea lobster larva may not have the most appealing names, but as these pictures show, they are real beauties in the flesh. Rarely seen by humans, these creatures are normally found thousands of feet below sea level where they live in complete darkness. The 'vampire squid from hell' that refuses to kill: Scientists find bizarre animal feeds on plankton and the rotting remains of dead fish.

Strange sea creature uses two long filaments to trap debris falling to the ocean floorUnique animal can turn itself inside out when threatened. Baby Opalescent Squid – A Beautiful Start to the Week. Photo by Jonathan Wong, Vancouver Aquarium In March of this year, staff at the Vancouver Aquarium became the proud ‘parents’ of 400 tiny opalescent squid. These tiny cephalopods (a taxonomic group including squid, octopus and cuttlefish) will eventually reach an adult size of 1 foot; however, they are currently no bigger than a grain of rice. The video footage shows the squid babies eating and undertaking some rudimentary jet-propulsive movement – but the most spectacular part of the video is the showcasing of the chromatophores. Chromatophores are the pigment-containing cells of all cephalopods, and they allow these creatures to become camouflaged in almost any environment.

Each pigment cell is directly connected to the nervous system and several muscle groups, which allows the squid to very intricately control both the amount of pigment and the specific colors used. Happy Monday! Why dolphins can recognise themselves in a mirror (and do tricks for fish) - they share 'brainy' genes with humans. The bizarre 'unicorn fish,' with a nose, that looks almost human.

That is definitely a bizarre looking fish--interesting though. – razorbladedevotchka

British scientists create artificial 'muscles' that can copy squid's ability to instantly change colour. Scientists unravel why giant squids have eyes the size of basketballs. I fought the claw, and the claw won: Scientists unravel mystery of shrimp's super-strong claws to build body armour. Entirely new 'grapefruit-sized' organ found in jaws of giant whales - is it a 'second brain' built to help them eat more? The beautiful monsters of the deep: The jellyfish in Norway which look more like aliens than sea-dwellers. Good job Daddy doesn't like caviar: Rare shot of 'jawfish' shows battle-scarred father carrying the family in his mouth. By Rob Waugh. Overview of the Amphibians Group Video. Amphibians are commonly found cold-blooded creatures, like frogs and toads. Learn about these sometimes slimy animals in this video from About.com.See Transcript Hi, I'm Jen D'Amore for About.com, and this video is all about the Amphibian class.

What are Amphibians? Amphibians are cold blooded tetrapods that usually reproduce in fresh water and are non-amniotes, meaning their eggs are not surrounded by several membranes. As cold-blooded creatures they cannot regulate their own body temperature and rely on the external environment to warm them. As tetrapods, they have 4 limbs. First evidence that shipping noise stresses whales - life - 08 February 2012. Even whales find noisy neighbours stressful – and they show it in their faeces. Carbon dioxide encourages risky behaviour in clownfish - life - 15 January 2012. Zoologger: Slime killer hagfish feasts in rotten flesh - life - 27 October 2011.

Deepest known 'black smoker' vent discovered - life - 10 January 2012. Why deep-sea dragonfish have such extraordinary jaws - life - 23 January 2012. Warming seas could smother seafood - environment - 08 September 2011. Giant red crabs invade the Antarctic abyss - environment - 07 September 2011. First recording of deep-water fish chat - life - 31 January 2012.

Reef search turns up hundreds of new species - life - 19 September 2008. Copycat cuttlefish may see same illusions as humans. Most fish in the sea evolved on land - life - 08 February 2012. Introduction: Mysteries of the deep sea - life - 04 September 2006. Census of Marine life: A Decade of Discovery. Welcome to OBIS! Ocean Biogeographic Information System.