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Most States Have Cut School Funding, and Some Continue Cutting. Most states provide less support per student for elementary and secondary schools than before the Great Recession.Most states provide less support per student for elementary and secondary schools — in some cases, much less — than before the Great Recession, our survey of state budget documents over the last three months finds.

Most States Have Cut School Funding, and Some Continue Cutting

Worse, some states are still cutting eight years after the recession took hold. Our country’s future depends crucially on the quality of its schools, yet rather than raising K-12 funding to support proven reforms such as hiring and retaining excellent teachers, reducing class sizes, and expanding access to high-quality early education, many states have headed in the opposite direction. These cuts weaken schools’ capacity to develop the intelligence and creativity of the next generation of workers and entrepreneurs. School choice gutted Detroit’s public schools. The rest of the country is next. – VICE News. It was a chilly afternoon in April 2013 when Roy Roberts, a former GM executive now charged with righting the struggling Detroit Public Schools, appeared in the auditorium of Oakman Elementary/Orthopedic, a school on the city’s northwest side.

School choice gutted Detroit’s public schools. The rest of the country is next. – VICE News

Roberts had arrived with an entourage of district officials and he didn’t waste any time with small talk. “We’ll be closing Northwestern,” he announced. About a dozen parents were there, among them Aliya Moore, the president of the parents’ organization. Moore’s older daughter, Chrishawana, was in fifth grade and her final year at the school, where she’d been since kindergarten. Her youngest, Tylyia, just a toddler at the time, had become a fixture on the campus, often seen coloring in the back of one of the kindergarten classrooms. Now she and the other parents looked at Roberts, perplexed. Detroit Public Schools 'neglecting' its students at $14K per pupil [Michigan Capitol Confidential] Detroit Free Press Columnist Rochelle Riley laments “Oh, if only the children of Detroit were pieces of art” in a column in which she claims no leaders want to talk about education in Detroit.

Detroit Public Schools 'neglecting' its students at $14K per pupil [Michigan Capitol Confidential]

Log In - New York Times. Charter Networks, Education Non-Profits Steer Clear of Detroit - The Atlantic. With some of the nation’s most devastated schools, Detroit is in desperate need of new ideas, new energy, and lots of money.

Charter Networks, Education Non-Profits Steer Clear of Detroit - The Atlantic

But when local advocates approach organizations that have invested millions of dollars—and countless hours of problem-solving—into jumpstarting schools in cities like Washington, Memphis, Indianapolis, and New Orleans, the answer often comes back the same: No. Detroit Schools: Inside an Experiment to Save the District. When Detroit students return to school on Sept. 6, the rodents and mold found in classrooms last year will be all but gone.

Detroit Schools: Inside an Experiment to Save the District

Cracked windows will be repaired. Collapsed ceilings patched up. Chipped paint removed. Last year, not a single Detroit public school complied with the city's public health and safety codes, one reason teachers protested with widespread sick-outs that temporarily crippled the system. Snyder urges high school funding boost in $56.3B budget. Lansing — Michigan Gov.

Snyder urges high school funding boost in $56.3B budget

Rick Snyder is calling for additional spending to support high school classrooms and “at risk” students as part of a $56.3 billion budget plan celebrated by some public education officials but criticized by charter school advocates. The governor presented his 2018 spending plan to legislators Wednesday, pitching a series of new initiatives while continuing to resist the personal income tax cut proposals his fellow Republicans in the state Legislature are clamoring for.

Snyder’s executive budget recommends an extra $50 in per-pupil funding for Michigan high schools. The targeted $20 million would be a new approach for Michigan, which has not traditionally based funding on grade-specific needs. “It’s common sense that it costs more to fund a high school” than an elementary or middle school, Snyder told reporters after his presentation, pointing to advanced science classes and chemistry labs as examples. “It’s a deviation from the past,” Naeyaert said. Detroit schools and the $715-million Band-Aid. It’s a lot of money, but don’t call it a fix.

Detroit schools and the $715-million Band-Aid

The $715 million cash infusion that the Michigan Legislature is considering giving to Detroit Public Schools would no doubt pay off the school district’s $515 million in debt over 10 years, and provide some reserves. It’s a big ask, and one that has raised doubts. Doubts that outstate Michigan residents will support more money for Detroit schools due to the state's role in running DPS. Anatomy of Detroit’s Decline - Interactive Feature.

Mayor Coleman A. Young of Detroit at an event in 1980. Richard Sheinwald/Associated Press The financial crisis facing Detroit was decades in the making, caused in part by a trail of missteps, suspected corruption and inaction. Here is a sampling of some city leaders who trimmed too little, too late and, rather than tackling problems head on, hoped that deep-rooted structural problems would turn out to be cyclical downturns. Charles E. Edward Jeffries, who served as mayor from 1940 to 1948, developed the Detroit Plan, which involved razing 100 blighted acres and preparing the land for redevelopment.

Albert Cobo was considered a candidate of the wealthy and of the white during his tenure from 1950 to 1957.