Civil war

Facebook Twitter
Blue Gray Review | An American Civil War site From The New-York Times January 10, 1864: Ladies’ National Army Relief Association. WASHINGTON, Thursday, Jan. 7, 1864. Blue Gray Review | An American Civil War site
Seven Score and Ten | The Civil War Sesquicentennial Day by Day CAIRO, Thursday, April 14. On Tuesday morning the rebel Gen. FORREST attacked Fort Pillow. Seven Score and Ten | The Civil War Sesquicentennial Day by Day
Mirth and melancholy were both a part of the entertainment of senior Confederate officers on this day 150 years ago. Diarist Mary Boykin Chesnut recorded her impressions of a full day of entertainments, including breakfast, dinner, supper, and some amateur theatricals. Many of the officers present were recovering from wounds or captivity in Northern prison camps. One of Mrs. Chesnut's guests was Brigadier General Alexander R. Lawton, the Quartermaster General of the Confederate Army. The American Civil War The American Civil War
Item Description: Diary entry, 15 April 1864, by Sarah Lois Wadley, describing the Union occupation of Monroe. Wadley was the daughter of William Morrill Wadley (1812?-1882) and Rebecca Barnard Everingham Wadley (fl. 1840-1884) and lived with her family in homes near Amite in Tangipahoa Parish, Monroe and Oakland in Ouachita Parish, La., and near Macon, Ga. [Item transcription available below images] Item Citation: From folder 5 of the Sarah Lois Wadley Papers # 1258, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Civil War Day by Day | From the Louis Round Wilson Special Collections Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Civil War Day by Day | From the Louis Round Wilson Special Collections Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Daily Observations from The Civil War — Day by day writings of the time. January 13.—The rebel Congress, having passed a joint resolution of thanks to General Robert E. Lee, and his officers, Adjutant-General Cooper issued an order announcing the fact, with the following preface: “The President, having approved the following joint resolution of Congress, directs its announcement in general orders, expressive of his gratification at the tribute awarded the patriot officers and soldiers to whom it is addressed. “For the military laggard, or him, who, in the pursuits of selfish and inglorious ease, forgets his country’s need, no note of approbation is sounded. His infamy is his only security from oblivion. Daily Observations from The Civil War — Day by day writings of the time.
Civil War Daily Gazette Civil War Daily Gazette Davis Shoots Down Proposal to Free the Slaves January 13, 1864 (Thursday) It wasn’t exactly a coup, or even the rumblings of such. But it was revolutionary, at least in thought. General Patrick Cleburne commanded a division in Joe Johnston’s Army of Tennessee. As a military commander, he was well respected by officers both Southern and Northern. History would remember him as the “Stonewall of the West.”
[TAG]The climax of Steven Spielberg’s film “Lincoln” — the passage of the 13th Amendment in the House of Representatives — vividly captures the culmination of a dramatic yearlong legislative battle that mixed skillful behind-the-scenes maneuverings with high-minded constitutional debate, internecine party politics, personal animosities and the polarizing dynamics of a presidential election. Approval in the House on Jan. 31, 1865, trailed the amendment’s passage in the Senate on April 8, 1864, by almost 10 months. Its adoption by 27 states the following December introduced the word “slavery” into the Constitution for the first time. But the amendment’s successful ratification was not the first time Americans had sought a constitutional remedy for slavery. On Feb. 28, 1861, a close vote in Congress sent the Corwin Amendment to the states. Named for its House sponsor, Ohio Republican Thomas Corwin, the proposal was actually the work of the soon-to-be secretary of state William H. DISUNION - Opinionator DISUNION - Opinionator