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Blue Gray Review | An American Civil War site “The fort ran with blood.” From the Richmond Daily Dispatch April 18, 1864: The capture of Fort Pillow Blue Gray Review | An American Civil War site
Seven Score and Ten | The Civil War Sesquicentennial Day by Day CAIRO, Thursday, April 14. On Tuesday morning the rebel Gen. FORREST attacked Fort Pillow. Seven Score and Ten | The Civil War Sesquicentennial Day by Day
Mary Boykin Chesnut's time in wartime Richmond was drawing to a close. Her husband, James Chesnut, Jr., had decided to re-enter the Confederate army and take command of reserve troops back in South Carolina. Mary was preparing to return to Camden, South Carolina. April 11th. - Drove with Mrs. Davis and all her infant family; wonderfully clever and precocious children, with unbroken wills. At one time there was a sudden uprising of the nursery contingent. The American Civil War The American Civil War
Item Description: Diary entry, 15 April 1864, by Sarah Lois Wadley, describing the Union occupation of Monroe. Wadley was the daughter of William Morrill Wadley (1812?-1882) and Rebecca Barnard Everingham Wadley (fl. 1840-1884) and lived with her family in homes near Amite in Tangipahoa Parish, Monroe and Oakland in Ouachita Parish, La., and near Macon, Ga. [Item transcription available below images] Item Citation: From folder 5 of the Sarah Lois Wadley Papers # 1258, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Civil War Day by Day | From the Louis Round Wilson Special Collections Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Civil War Day by Day | From the Louis Round Wilson Special Collections Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Daily Observations from The Civil War — Day by day writings of the time. April 16, Saturday. Had a long telegram at midnight from Cairo, respecting Rebel movements in western Kentucky, — at Paducah, Columbus, Fort Pillow, etc. Strange that an army of 6000 Rebels should be moving unmolested within our lines. But for the gunboats, they would repossess themselves of the defenses, yet General Halleck wants the magnanimity and justice to acknowledge or even mention the service. There is still much excitement and uneasy feeling on the gold and currency question. Daily Observations from The Civil War — Day by day writings of the time.
Civil War Daily Gazette Civil War Daily Gazette Davis Shoots Down Proposal to Free the Slaves January 13, 1864 (Thursday) It wasn’t exactly a coup, or even the rumblings of such. But it was revolutionary, at least in thought. General Patrick Cleburne commanded a division in Joe Johnston’s Army of Tennessee. As a military commander, he was well respected by officers both Southern and Northern. History would remember him as the “Stonewall of the West.”
[TAG]The climax of Steven Spielberg’s film “Lincoln” — the passage of the 13th Amendment in the House of Representatives — vividly captures the culmination of a dramatic yearlong legislative battle that mixed skillful behind-the-scenes maneuverings with high-minded constitutional debate, internecine party politics, personal animosities and the polarizing dynamics of a presidential election. Approval in the House on Jan. 31, 1865, trailed the amendment’s passage in the Senate on April 8, 1864, by almost 10 months. Its adoption by 27 states the following December introduced the word “slavery” into the Constitution for the first time. But the amendment’s successful ratification was not the first time Americans had sought a constitutional remedy for slavery. On Feb. 28, 1861, a close vote in Congress sent the Corwin Amendment to the states. Named for its House sponsor, Ohio Republican Thomas Corwin, the proposal was actually the work of the soon-to-be secretary of state William H. DISUNION - Opinionator DISUNION - Opinionator