Bletchley/cranfield

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Lone Sentry: German Visual Communication Between Aircraft and Ground Troops (WWII Tactical and Technical Trends, No. 24, May 6, 1943) Modern warfare puts a heavy premium on successful coordination of all of the various arms. For that reason, comprehensive and flexible methods of communication must be devised. Liaison between air and ground forces presents special problems, and a German document gives the following outline of methods used to meet some of the difficulties. Lone Sentry: German Visual Communication Between Aircraft and Ground Troops (WWII Tactical and Technical Trends, No. 24, May 6, 1943)
HOW TO BECOME ENTANGLED IN RED TAPE Experiences of WWII I was 19 years old when war was declared by Neville Chamberlain that Sunday morning. I had completed my first year at London University (Bedford College) and was due to return for my second year in early October. WW2 People's War - RedTape WW2 People's War - RedTape
The Wartime Memories Project - Bletchley Park
An operational Sortie - RAF Coastal Command - World War 2 Talk
RAF Cranfield, Bedfordshire
WW2 People's War - Smugglers or Spies ? Smugglers or spies ? Dear Jack, Here are a few words that may be helpful for your homework on WW2. WW2 People's War - Smugglers or Spies ?
WW2 People's War - 58 raids in 49 days. This story has been written onto the BBC People’s War site by CSV Story gatherer Jessica on behalf of Derek Woodward. They fully understand the terms and conditions of the site. 59 raids in 48 days - no wonder the rubble of Plymouth built the runway. Local houses lost their top storey as their roofs were lowered only the church escaped. Dodging Dartmoor mists and Shorpiter Radar mast brought 2 flying Forts’ emergency landings, both by the same crew and later ‘slipped out’ one wing down, tail up, very tricky. WW2 People's War - 58 raids in 49 days.
WW2 People's War - No2 Flying Training School - Pt 1 WW2 People's War - No2 Flying Training School - Pt 1 Brize Norton in Oxfordshire on the edge of the Cotswolds opened in August 1937. The airfield was almost circular and was grass. There were five C type hangars. The station buildings were all brick and some had a Georgian look. Like all the pre-war stations it had a barrack square. The nearest railway station was Bampton that overlooked the airfield.
WW2 People's War - WW2 Memories of an aircraft fitter
WW2 People's War - Beauforts and Spitfires: An Apprentice at large in the Aircraft Industry in Southampton during the early years of WW2 WW2 People's War - Beauforts and Spitfires: An Apprentice at large in the Aircraft Industry in Southampton during the early years of WW2 My WW2 experiences are in two halves: there are no acts of heroism on my part but, looking back, I believe that, as a young man, my experiences taught me to cope with whatever circumstances I found myself in. This stood me in good stead for the remainder of my working life. For the first half of the war, as a civilian, I was confronted with far more danger than I experienced during the remainder of the war with the Fleet Air Arm (see Part 2 of my story for People’s War). I left Bishop Wordsworth’s School in Salisbury in 1938 at the age of 18 to become an apprentice in the aircraft industry at Folland Aircraft, Hamble, Southampton. The factory, on the shores of Southampton water, was already gearing up to a wartime level of production. When the war started, semi-skilled and unskilled workers swelled the workforce.
WW2 People's War - You Had A Good War: Part 2 Sealand in the spring of 1942 looked very bleak, with its red brick barrack blocks, each named after a First World War battle-field. The complex was divided into three main parts, two of them connected by a bridge, were across the main road, they consisted of the aerodrome, hangars, workshops, airmen’s barracks, dispersal fields and across the railway line was the civilian M.U. On the other side of the road were the H.Q., the sick bay, the engine and propeller workshops, Salvation Army canteen, W.A.A.F. quarters and another mess. Initially, we had to walk about a mile or so to get our meals. WW2 People's War - You Had A Good War: Part 2
WW2 People's War - Eager For The Air: The Story Of The Air Transport Auxiliary WW2 People's War - Eager For The Air: The Story Of The Air Transport Auxiliary This story was submitted to the people's War site by volunteer Jackie Ashman Project Co-ordinator for the South Gloucestershire and North-East Area of Bristol, on behalf of Wing Commander Rtd. Eric Viles, MBE and has been added to the site with his permission. Eric Viles fully understands the site's terms and conditions. Eager for the Air - The Air Transport Auxiliary is a story about a little known organisation that became crucial to helping the RAF to obtain their aircraft, whilst keeping their pilots free to do their work. The RAF had been ferrying aircraft from the aircraft manufacturer; the Bristol Aeroplane Company, in Filton, in South Gloucestershire, as indeed they had from other manufacturing sites from all over the UK. Then when WW2 was deemed imminent it was quickly apparent that their services would be urgently required elsewhere.
This is just some of the huts in view, in the top secret Station X. The place that no one knew about and the place that managed to keep "Top Secret" for many years. The people who worked in the huts at Bletchley Park, found that they were not to mix with people from the other huts. WW2 People's War - The Huts at Bletchley Park WW2 People's War - The Huts at Bletchley Park
WW2 People's War - A Classical Scholar at Bletchley Park This story was submitted to the People's War Site by Margaret Walsh of The Royal Star and Garter Home on behalf of Ralph Instone and has been added to the site with his permission. I was an Infantry Officer, and I was in the Army from 1939 to 1946. Being a classical scholar I was employed as a cryptographer at Bletchley Park. We obtained the enemy signals traffic by wireless interception. In spite of the numbers involved it was a very well-kept secret, because for 30 years the general public did not know what had gone on there. WW2 People's War - A Classical Scholar at Bletchley Park
I was at Bletchley Park from 1943-1945 (see my other entry under I was one of Churchills Geese). During my time at Bletchley Park, drama, as well as other artistic activities, flourished. There were groups in both the Park itself and in Shenley Road Military Camp. I was personally involved in one way or another with productions of Bernard Shaw's 'Candida', J.B.Priestley's 'They Came To A City' and an ambitious presentation of 'Berkeley Square'. WW2 People's War - Drama Productions at Bletchley Park
Eileen Murray left her home in Rock Street, Salford, to commence duty with the WRNS in October 1941. Her brother, Leslie, who was serving in the Royal Navy, took her down to Greenwich, for her initial training. She was posted to HMS Pembroke but allocated to special dutues at "Station X", where she served until 6, June, 1945. WW2 People's War - ULTRA secret service
This story was submitted to the People’s War site by Roger Marsh of the ‘Action Desk — Sheffield’ Team on behalf of Oliver Hugh Lawn and Sheila Isabelle (nee Mackenzie) Lawn, and has been added to the site with both the author’s permission. The authors fully understand the site's terms and conditions. Wartime Code Breaking By Oliver Hugh Lawn and Sheila Isabelle (nee Mackenzie) Lawn Oliver and Sheila Lawn both worked at Bletchley Park in Buckinghamshire, the very secret wartime code breaking establishment. It was called the Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ). All the work done at Bletchley Park remained Top Secret for some 30 years after the war, and only then were Oliver and Sheila able to talk about their work there. WW2 People's War - Wartime Code Breaking
WW2 People's War - Breaking the Code This story was submitted to the People's War site by Philippa on behalf of Joyce Baxter and has been added to the site with her permission. Joyce fully understands the site's terms and conditions. I was 18 when war started and living in London. I was suddenly called to London from a quiet posting in Hertfordshire and put on a train. I had no idea where I was going but the mystery was solved when I got out at Bletchley and was taken to the grounds of Bletchley Park - a not very distinguished stately home. Whilst there I learned the thrilling news that we had broken the German code.
WW2 People's War - Commander Travis I was looking through my mother's books recently and came across something she had written on the fly leaf of a copy of 'Most Secret War'. 'A typist, an indexer and finally a marker of de-coded naval Enigma signals, working in Block A - eventually ruled over by Commander Travis'. Commander Travis is my Guide I nothing lack with him beside
WW2 People's War - Memories of Bletchley Park
WW2 People's War - A Year at Bletchley Park
WW2 People's War - Denis Whelan - His Association with Bletchley Park
WW2 People's War - Wartime - Bletchley Park WAAF 1942 - 47.
WW2 People's War - A Wartime Winter Journey with the WAAF to Bletchley Park
WW2 People's War - From School Girl to Code Breaker
WW2 People's War - My years at Bletchley Park – Station X
WW2 People's War - Life at Bletchley Park
WW2 People's War - Children of the Park: Memories of Bletchley Park
WW2 People's War - Children of the Park
WW2 People's War - Yes, Mum, There Really Was a Secret: Bletchley Park
WW2 People's War - The Breaking of the Enigma Code
WW2 People's War - My Father's Secret: Bletchley Park and Beyond
WW2 People's War - HUT 6, Bletchley Park
WW2 People's War - Memories of a WAAF Teleprinter Operator at Station X (Bletchley Park)
WW2 People's War - Breaking the Code: A WAAF at Bletchley
WW2 People's War - Archive List
WW2 People's War - 'Alfriston, My Life in a Country Village' by RA Levett
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Cranfield Express - Your village newspaper! History, Pictures, stories and more...
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The Wartime Memories Project - Midlands page 2
The Wartime Memories Project - RAF Cranfield