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August 31, 2010 By: Maryellen Weimer, PhD in Teaching and Learning Problem solving is “what you do when you don’t know what to do.” To Improve Students’ Problem Solving Skills Add Group Work to the Equation To Improve Students’ Problem Solving Skills Add Group Work to the Equation
The Collaborative Classroom The Collaborative Classroom M.B. Tinzmann, B.F. Jones, T.F. Fennimore, J. Bakker, C.
eSchool News » Five characteristics of an effective 21st-century educator » Print eSchool News » Five characteristics of an effective 21st-century educator » Print Readers say key skills include foresight, lifelong learning, and the ability to evaluate new technologies By Meris Stansbury, Online Editor Read more by Meris Stansbury September 9th, 2011 "The effective 21st-century teacher will need to be adept in judging the educative and non-educative use of technologies," said one reader.
The Evolution of a 21st Century Educator | Smarter Science
I've been reading a lot about the flipped model of classroom instruction, where students watch instructional videos for homework, and then do the practice and problem solving during class time. Here's a video of the process being explained by Aaron Sams. Some of the questions I have are pretty much the same as the ones posted as responses to the YouTube video so I'll just quote them: Professional blog | 21st Century Educator Professional blog | 21st Century Educator
Andrew Miller is a consultant for the Buck Institute for Education, an organization that specializes in project-based curriculum. See his previous blogs for Edutopia and follow him on Twitter @betamiller. Driving questions (DQ) can be a beast.

How to Write Effective Driving Questions for Project-Based Learning

How to Write Effective Driving Questions for Project-Based Learning
Digital Literacy: Skills for the 21st Century: Introduction Digital Literacy: Skills for the 21st Century: Introduction This Digital Literacy Toolkit began with the premise that multimedia authoring, which is happening with the extensive use of PowerPoint in classrooms, must be taught as a skill, just as traditional text-based writing is taught. While teachers and students have become familiar with the technical skills required to use images in multimedia productions, they lack a critical language to determine whether an image or a sound is used appropriately. Images, sounds and animations — like words — are building blocks whose meanings can be changed to suit the communicative purpose of the author. Just as the same words and phrases can be arranged or manipulated to express different meanings depending on the author’s intent, so can sounds and images.
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