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Britain’s top psychiatrists warn Tory benefit cuts are making mental health conditions worse. Illness: Perhaps Iain Duncan Smith will not admit the harm caused by his reforms because he, himself, has a mental health problem?

Britain’s top psychiatrists warn Tory benefit cuts are making mental health conditions worse

This Writer knows from the experiences of people around me that the psychiatrists’ verdict is correct. Iain Duncan Smith says otherwise. But then, people who are mentally ill rarely realise that they have a problem. Source: Britain’s top psychiatrists warn Tory benefit cuts are making mental health conditions worse – Mirror Online Join the Vox Political Facebook page. If you have appreciated this article, don’t forget to share it using the buttons at the bottom of this page. Vox Political needs your help! Buy Vox Political books so we can continue fighting for the facts.Health Warning: Government! The first collection, Strong Words and Hard Times,is still available in either print or eBook format here: Like this: Like Loading... A Selection of Especially Stupid Benefit Sanctions. You’re a 60-year-old army veteran who volunteers to sell poppies for the Royal British Legion in memory of fallen comrades.

A Selection of Especially Stupid Benefit Sanctions

You’ve applied for dozens of jobs – including the supermarket where you sold the poppies – but without success. You are sanctioned for four weeks. Source: Daily Mirror You get a job interview. It’s at the same time as your job centre appointment, so you reschedule the job centre. Source: Daily Mail Your gran dies during the night. Source: Mari-claire M at Netmums You’ve signed in on time, been to interviews and applied for work. BBC iPlayer - Britain's Trillion Pound Island - Inside Cayman. Majority of teachers in survey know pupils who arrive at school hungry. DWP to apologise to woman whose brother killed himself after his benefits were cut.

A woman whose partially sighted brother killed himself after his benefits were cut is to receive an apology from the Department for Work and Pensions, after the health service ombudsman partially upheld her complaint about his case.

DWP to apologise to woman whose brother killed himself after his benefits were cut

It marks the end of a two-year battle for Linda Cooksey, 60, who believes her brother Tim Salter, a recluse with undiagnosed mental health problems, should never have been found fit for work by DWP assessors. Salter, described by his sister as a lovely man, killed himself in September 2013, nine months after his benefits were stopped. A coroner ruled that a major factor in the 53-year-old’s death was that his benefits had been greatly reduced, leaving him almost destitute.

“I’m pleased they have partially upheld my complaint,” said Cooksey, an insurance consultant from Stourbridge. “It’s not the outcome I wanted and I’m still awaiting the apology from the DWP, but the worst is over now and I feel I have closure.” Dad of two killed himself because he was losing his disability benefits. George Osborne sobbed in a public show of grief at Margaret Thatcher’s funeral – meanwhile there were private tears for a victim of his government’s welfare cuts.

Dad of two killed himself because he was losing his disability benefits

They came after a dad of two killed himself because he was losing his disability benefits, the Sunday People reports. Former sheep farmer Nick Barker, 51, was told he was fit for work, even though a brain haemorrage had left him ­struggling to walk. He shot himself after the shock verdict by Atos, the ­private drafted in by the Department of Work and Pensions to cut claimants. His family were still reeling from the tragedy when Tory Chancellor Mr Osborne was pictured weeping at last Wednesday’s service in London for Baroness Thatcher. Nick’s ex-wife Linda, the mother of his children, said yesterday: “It doesn’t seem right to see George Osborne crying over Margaret Thatcher when tragedies are happening because of the way his ­government is reforming the benefits system.”

He had raised concerns with his GP about ­losing his income. The DWP's Work Programme is actually making mental health problems worse, study finds. The Government’s Work Programme is making the lives of people with mental health problems worse and actually making them less able to work, research by a charity has found.

The DWP's Work Programme is actually making mental health problems worse, study finds

Mind said the flagship scheme, which requires people to take unpaid work allocated by contractors on pain of losing their benefits, was taking entirely the wrong approach and actually undermining work. Research by the charity found that most people on the scheme because of their mental health problems reported worsening health issues due to their experiences of it. 83 per cent of people surveyed said the scheme’s “support” had made their mental health problems worse of much worse. Additionally, over three quarters of people – 76 per cent – said the Work Programme had actually made them feel less able to work than before they were allocated to it. In the first year of the £450million programme, just two out of 100 people on the scheme returned to work for more than six months.

Welfare to work programme failing disabled and ill jobseekers, say charities. The government’s flagship welfare to work programme is failing tens of thousands of disabled and ill jobseekers, charities have said.

Welfare to work programme failing disabled and ill jobseekers, say charities

Ministers claimed latest official statistics showed the Work Programme was transforming the lives of many long-term unemployed jobseekers. But charities said the £5bn scheme was struggling to help people who had been on incapacity benefit to find work. Companies delivering the Work Programme admitted it had been hard to find employment for many jobseekers in this category and more investment was needed to prepare them to move off benefits and into work. The government has pledged to help a million more disabled people into work by 2020. A successful Work Programme, which has so far taken on 300,000 people on employment and support allowance (ESA, the successor to incapacity benefit) will be key to meeting this aspiration.

Even where there were low expectations, performance had been poor.