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Scotland, politics

Schoolma’am May has offered a gift to Nicola Sturgeon. The uninitiated, on first encountering an SNP conference, might think that they were already stepping on to independent turf and that only the flourish of a civil servant’s pen was required to make it official.

Schoolma’am May has offered a gift to Nicola Sturgeon

After two or three days of being held in the embrace of such boundless optimism you sometimes find yourself desperately seeking a dose of misery just to feel normal and Scottish once more; a Pink Floyd album perhaps, or a video of Great Scotland World Cup disasters. Yet, courtesy of Theresa May’s constitutional intervention, the waves of optimism washing over SNP delegates at the party’s conference in Aberdeen this weekend were turned into something approaching certainty. Symbols. Northern Ireland flags issue. The Northern Ireland flags issue is one that divides the population along sectarian lines.

Northern Ireland flags issue

Depending on political allegiance, people identify with differing flags and symbols, some of which have, or have had, official status in Northern Ireland. Common flags[edit] The flag of the United Kingdom, the Union Flag, is the only official flag, and is routinely used on British government buildings in Northern Ireland.[1] It is made from an amalgamation of the crosses of St George (representing England), St Andrew (representing Scotland) and St Patrick (representing Ireland). The Union Flag is often flown by unionists and loyalists but is disliked by nationalists and republicans. British law and policy states that in Northern Ireland, "The Ulster flag and the Cross of St Patrick have no official status and under the Flags Regulations are not permitted to be flown from Government Buildings. Counties. Counties of Northern Ireland. Counties of Northern Ireland The counties of Northern Ireland -- Antrim, Armagh, Down, Fermanagh, Londonderry and Tyrone—were the principal local government divisions of Northern Ireland from its creation in 1921 until 1972, when their governmental features were abolished and replaced with twenty-six unitary authorities.[1] The counties of Northern Ireland form two-thirds of the historical province of Ulster.

Counties of Northern Ireland

The counties[edit] Background of the counties[edit] The English administration in Ireland in the years following the Anglo-Norman invasion of Ireland created counties as the major subdivisions of an Irish province.[2] This process lasted a period from the 13th to 17th centuries, however the number and shape of the counties that would form the future Northern Ireland would not be defined until the Flight of the Earls allowed the shiring of Ulster from 1604.[1] Citizenship and nationality. Irish nationality law. Irish nationality law is contained in the provisions of the Irish Nationality and Citizenship Acts 1956 to 2004 and in the relevant provisions of the Irish Constitution.

Irish nationality law

A person may be an Irish citizen[1] through birth, descent, marriage to an Irish citizen or through naturalisation. The law grants citizenship to individuals born in Northern Ireland under the same conditions as those born in the Republic of Ireland. Acquisition of citizenship[edit] Governance. Northern Ireland law. Background[edit] English law in England and Wales;Northern Ireland law in Northern Ireland;Scots law in Scotland.

Northern Ireland law

Northern Ireland is a common law jurisdiction. Although its common law is similar to that in England and Wales, and partially derives from the same sources, there are some important differences in law and procedure between Northern Ireland and England and Wales. Legislation[edit] The current statute law of Northern Ireland comprises those Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom that apply to Northern Ireland and Acts of the Northern Ireland Assembly, as well as statutory instruments made by departments of the Northern Ireland Executive and the UK Government.

Elections in Northern Ireland. Elections in Northern Ireland are held on a regular basis to the Northern Ireland Assembly, the Parliament of the United Kingdom, and to the European Parliament.

Elections in Northern Ireland

Regular elections are also held in Northern Ireland to local councils. Northern Ireland-wide elections[edit] Elections to the European Parliament[edit] Elections to the British House of Commons[edit] General Elections[edit] Politics of Northern Ireland. Since 1998, Northern Ireland has devolved government within the United Kingdom.

Politics of Northern Ireland

The Government and Parliament of the United Kingdom are responsible for reserved and excepted matters. Reserved matters are a list of policy area (such as civil aviation, units of measurement, and human genetics), which the Westminster Parliament may devolve to the Northern Ireland Assembly at some time in future. Excepted matters (such as international relations, taxation and elections) are never expected to be considered for devolution. On all other matters, the Northern Ireland Executive together with the 108-member Northern Ireland Assembly may legislate and govern for Northern Ireland. Could Irish history offer answers in the Scottish Independence debate? 9 March 2012Last updated at 09:54 ET By Stephen Walker BBC NI political reporter The referendum will take place in 2014 People in Scotland have two years to make up their minds over the arguments for and against independence.

Could Irish history offer answers in the Scottish Independence debate?

Scottish independence referendum: What is devolution max? 20 February 2012Last updated at 14:39 By Michael Buchanan BBC News Looking to the future - will it be "as-you-are", "devo max" or full independence?

Scottish independence referendum: What is devolution max?

Independence for Scotland is fairly straight-forward. Off they go, [or maybe I should say off we go - as a Hebridean living in London]. Anyway, according to opinion polls, I may be spared such contortions as something called "devo max", it seems, is Scotland's favoured option - but the problem is no on seems to know what it is. The science of independence: has Scotland's number come up?

19 February 2012Last updated at 15:06 By Ken Macdonald BBC Scotland Science Correspondent The researchers used mathematics to identify where new nations were likely to be born Scotland's constitutional debate does not lack for claim and counterclaim.

The science of independence: has Scotland's number come up?

Scottish electoral geography is working to the SNP’s advantage. (Photo: Jeff J Mitchell/Getty) The dramatic rout of Scottish Labour continues. Polls suggest the SNP will take 55 out of 59 seats and of the 14 constituencies surveyed by Lord Ashcroft, only Glasgow North East is set to remain in Labour hands. Such political collapses are rare in UK politics – so what’s going on? Prior to 2011, the dividing line of Scottish politics was ‘to be or not to be’ Labour. Scotland’s Place in the World and the Problem with British Isolationism. Scotland’s Place in the World and the Problem with British Isolationism Gerry Hassan The Scotsman, November 3rd 2012.

The Truth About Scottish Independence: The McCrone Report Scandal. The McCrone Report. Mc Crone Oil Report McCrones Report Gavin McCrones Top Secret Oil Report McCrone North Sea Oil Report. Only a vote for the SNP will stop the Tories slashing more Scottish budgets etc. The Conservative commissioned Mc Crone Report - that was classified Top Secret This report was then passed in secret to the Labour Party when they took power.

Why is Willie MacRae a Scottish nationalist politician and lawyer best remembered for the mystery surrounding his death. McCrone and the trust of the Scottish people. Wednesday, 02 November 2011 16:04 by David Milligan The McCrone Oil Report was released after a Freedom of Information request in 2005 shortly after the law regarding information such as this was brought in. Not much has been said about the background of the people surrounding it and I decided to do on-line research to establish or discredit this document, which the British government classified as secret. It gives an insight into the thinking of the politicians surrounding the events of that time (1975), and clearly shows that Scotland would have done very well if it had gone independent at that time.

Dear Scotland: here are 76 things we'd like to apologise for, love England. 1 Sorry for calling every last one of you "Jock". We now know it's offensive, especially if you're a woman. 2 So sorry for the years of heartless Conservative governments that you never voted for that ripped the heart out of the Scottish mining, steel and shipbuilding industries, butchered public services and imposed an unwonted, dismal neo-liberal ethos on a land to which such a callous political and economic philosophy was inimical. 3 And for making you guinea pigs for Margaret Thatcher's disastrous poll tax, inflicting it on you a year before England and Wales, and then – somehow!

– forgetting to backdate the rebate for the tax when it was abolished in the early 90s. In five years' time, the Union will be no more. 'Devo plus' for Scotland? Let's unpack it. David Cameron's union address: a speech of style but no substance. Scottish independence is fast becoming the only option. An independent Scotland must own its energy sources. The poverty of the Better Together campaign. More power to Glasgow's online journalists. Scottish referendum: why Chomsky's yes is more interesting than Bowie's no. The referendum campaign's not toxic, but intoxicating.

Alex Salmond: a solitary man, a singular vision. Scottish independence is fast becoming the only option. 2016 Scottish Election. Simplify 2014. Scottish Republic: The Positives of the Scottish Independence Facts. Scottish Parliament general election, 2011. Scottish Parliament general election, 2007. Your Scotland, Your Voice: A National Conversation. Acts of Union 1707. Nicola Sturgeon. Writer and broadcaster. Scottish National Party. Scottish referendum: 50 fascinating facts you should know about Scotland. Scotland independence: all the data you need. Scottish independence: the essential guide.