Other Constellations of note

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Ursa Minor. Ursa Minor (Latin: "Smaller Bear", contrasting with Ursa Major), also known as the Little Bear, is a constellation in the northern sky.

Ursa Minor

Ursa Major. Asterisms[edit] Another asterism known as the "Three Leaps of Gazelle"[2] is recognized in Arab culture, a series of three pairs of stars: ν and ξ Ursae Majoris, Alula Borealis and Australis, the "first leap";λ and μ Ursae Majoris, Tania Borealis and Australis, the "second leap";ι and κ Ursae Majoris, Talitha Borealis and Australis, the "third leap".

Ursa Major

Orion (constellation) The earliest depiction that has been linked to the constellation of Orion is a prehistoric (Aurignacian) mammoth ivory carving found in a cave in the Ach valley in Germany in 1979.

Orion (constellation)

Archaeologists have estimated it to have been fashioned approximately 32,000 to 38,000 years ago.[2][3][4] The distinctive pattern of Orion has been recognized in numerous cultures around the world, and many myths have been associated with it. It has also been used as a symbol in the modern world. The Babylonian star catalogues of the Late Bronze Age name Orion MULSIPA.ZI.AN.NA,[note 1] "The Heavenly Shepherd" or "True Shepherd of Anu" - Anu being the chief god of the heavenly realms.[5] The Babylonian constellation was sacred to Papshukal and Ninshubur, both minor gods fulfilling the role of 'messenger to the gods'. Draco (constellation) Draco is a constellation in the far northern sky.

Draco (constellation)

Its name is Latin for dragon. Draco is circumpolar (that is, never setting) for many observers in the northern hemisphere. It was one of the 48 constellations listed by the 2nd century astronomer Ptolemy, and remains one of the 88 modern constellations today. The north pole of the ecliptic is in Draco. The constellation Draco as it can be seen by the naked eye. There are two other stars above magnitude 3 in Draco. Draco is home to several double stars and binary stars. η Draconis is a double star with a yellow-hued primary of magnitude 2.8 and a white-hued secondary of magnitude 8.2 located south of the primary. R Draconis is a red Mira-type variable star with a period of about 8 months. The constellation contains the star recently named Kepler-10 which has been confirmed to be orbited by Kepler-10b, the smallest ever rocky Earth-sized planet detected outside of our solar system. Citations ^ Jump up to: a b c d e French, Sue (July 2012). Cygnus (constellation) Cygnus contains Deneb, one of the brightest stars in the night sky and one corner of the Summer Triangle, as well as some notable X-ray sources and the giant stellar association of Cygnus OB2.

Cygnus (constellation)

One of the stars of this association, NML Cygni, is one of the largest stars currently known. The constellation is also home to Cygnus X-1, an distant X-ray binary containing a supergiant and unseen massive companion that was the first object widely held to be a black hole. Many star systems in Cygnus have known planets as a result of the Kepler Mission observing one patch of the sky, the patch is the area around Cygnus. Cygnus as depicted in Urania's Mirror, a set of constellation cards published in London c.1825. Surrounding it are Lacerta, Vulpecula and Lyra. In Polynesia, Cygnus was often recognized as a separate constellation. Canis Minor. Canis Minor contains only two stars brighter than the fourth magnitude, Procyon (Alpha Canis Minoris), with a magnitude of 0.34, and Gomeisa (Beta Canis Minoris), with a magnitude of 2.9.

Canis Minor

The constellation's dimmer stars were noted by Johann Bayer, who named eight stars including Alpha and Beta, and John Flamsteed, who numbered fourteen. Procyon is the seventh-brightest star in the night sky, as well as one of the closest. A yellow-white main sequence star, it has a white dwarf companion. Gomeisa is a blue-white main sequence star. Luyten's Star is a ninth-magnitude red dwarf and the Solar System's next closest stellar neighbour in the constellation after Procyon. History and mythology[edit] Canis Minor, as depicted by Johann Bode in his 1801 work Uranographia The ancient Egyptians thought of this constellation as Anubis, the jackal god.[13]

Canis Major. An image of Canis Major (top right) as seen from an airplane at around 8 degrees north (Andaman Sea west of Thailand).

Canis Major

Canis Major contains Sirius, the brightest star in the night sky, known as the 'dog star'. It is bright because of its proximity to our Solar System. Ophiuchus. Ophiuchus /ɒfiˈjuːkəs/ is a large constellation located around the celestial equator.

Ophiuchus

Its name is from the Greek Ὀφιοῦχος "serpent-bearer", and it is commonly represented as a man grasping the snake that is represented by the constellation Serpens. Ophiuchus was one of the 48 constellations listed by the 2nd-century astronomer Ptolemy, and it remains one of the 88 modern constellations. It was formerly referred to as Serpentarius /sɜrpənˈtɛəriəs/ and Anguitenens.

Location[edit] Ophiuchus straddles the equator but lies predominately to its north.