Common connotations of GREEN

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Envy. Portrait of a Woman Suffering from Obsessive Envy; Jean Louis Théodore Géricault (1791–1824) Envy (from Latin invidia) is an emotion which "occurs when a person lacks another's superior quality, achievement, or possession and either desires it or wishes that the other lacked it"[1] Bertrand Russell said that envy was one of the most potent causes of unhappiness.[2] Not only is the envious person rendered unhappy by his envy, but they also wish to inflict misfortune on others.

Envy

Although envy is generally seen as something negative, Russell also believed that envy was a driving force behind the movement towards democracy and must be endured to achieve a more just social system.[3] However, psychologists have recently suggested that there may be two types of envy: malicious envy and benign envy—benign envy being proposed as a type of positive motivational force.[4][5] Money.

A sample picture of a fictional ATM card.

Money

The largest part of the world's money exists only as accounting numbers which are transferred between financial computers. Various plastic cards and other devices give individual consumers the power to electronically transfer such money to and from their bank accounts, without the use of currency. Saint Patrick's Day. Saint Patrick's Day, or the Feast of Saint Patrick (Irish: Lá Fhéile Pádraig, "the Day of the Festival of Patrick"), is a cultural and religious holiday celebrated annually on 17 March, the death date of the most commonly-recognised patron saint of Ireland, Saint Patrick (c.

Saint Patrick's Day

AD 385–461). Saint Patrick's Day was made an official Christian feast day in the early seventeenth century and is observed by the Catholic Church, the Anglican Communion (especially the Church of Ireland),[4] the Eastern Orthodox Church and Lutheran Church. Saint Patrick's Day is a public holiday in the Republic of Ireland,[10] Northern Ireland,[11] Newfoundland and Labrador and Montserrat. It is also widely celebrated by the Irish diaspora around the world; especially in Britain, Canada, the United States, Argentina, Australia and New Zealand. Saint Patrick[edit] Much of what is known about St Patrick comes from the Declaration, which was allegedly written by Patrick himself. Spring (season) Colorful spring garden flowers Meteorologists generally define four seasons in many climatic areas: spring, summer, autumn (fall) and winter.

Spring (season)

These are demarcated by the values of their average temperatures on a monthly basis, with each season lasting three months. The three warmest months are by definition summer, the three coldest months are winter and the intervening gaps are spring and autumn. Spring, when defined in this manner, can start on different dates in different regions. Islam. Islam (/ˈɪslɑːm/;[note 1] Arabic: الإسلام‎, al-ʾIslām IPA: [ælʔɪsˈlæːm] (

Islam

Health. Health is the level of functional or metabolic efficiency of a living organism.

Health

In humans, it is the general condition of a person's mind and body, usually meaning to be free from illness, injury or pain (as in "good health" or "healthy").[1] The World Health Organization (WHO) defined health in its broader sense in 1946 as "a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity. Systematic activities to prevent or cure health problems and promote good health in humans are undertaken by health care providers. Applications with regard to animal health are covered by the veterinary sciences. Illness. Death due to disease is called death by natural causes.

Illness

There are four main types of disease: pathogenic disease, deficiency disease, hereditary disease, and physiological disease. Diseases can also be classified as communicable and non-communicable. Youth. A teenager in Italy.

Youth

The term teenager is often considered synonymous with youth. Hope. In leadership[edit] Napoleon Bonaparte said: "A leader is a dealer in hope".

Hope

[citation needed] Robert Mattox, social activist and futurist, has proposed a social-change theory based on the hope phenomenon.[6] There is significant research on the ability of leadership to effect change,[citation needed] but little research exists that examines the conditions of leadership necessary to initiate and successfully lead change. Many[quantify] leadership theories[weasel words] presuppose that an individual who does the right things will be an effective leader.

[citation needed] Larry Stout postulates that certain conditions must exist before even the most talented leaders can lead change. Nature. Nature, in the broadest sense, is equivalent to the natural, physical, or material world or universe.

Nature

Growth. Growth refers to a positive change in size, often over a period of time. Growth can occur as a stage of maturation or a process toward fullness or fulfillment. It can also perpetuate endlessly, for example, as detailed by some theories of the ultimate fate of the universe. The quantity can be: Physical (e.g., growth in height, growth in an amount of money)Abtract (e.g., a system becoming more complex, an organism becoming more mature) It can also refer to the mode of growth, i.e. numeric models for describing how much a particular quantity grows over time. Biology Social science Economy Mathematical models.