background preloader

PreHistory

Facebook Twitter

World-first genome study reveals rich history of Aboriginal Australians - Science News - ABC News. The most comprehensive genomic study of Indigenous Australians to date has revealed modern humans are all descendants of a single wave of migrants who left Africa about 72,000 years ago.

World-first genome study reveals rich history of Aboriginal Australians - Science News - ABC News

Key points Aboriginal and Papuan ancestors left Africa around 72,000 years agoArrived on supercontinent 'Sahul' around 50,000 years agoBy 31,000 years ago, most Aboriginal communities were genetically isolated from each other, giving rise to great genetic diversity It confirms modern Aboriginal Australians are the descendants of the first people to inhabit Australia — a claim that has previously been the subject of debate. And the genetic information also shows Aboriginal people living in desert conditions may have developed unique biological adaptations to survive the arid conditions. Artefacts found in Pilbara cave show Aboriginal life in northern WA dates back 50,000 years. Updated Testing of artefacts in an island cave in northern WA has established some of the oldest occupation dates recorded in Australia, proving Aboriginal Australians were living in the now largely submerged northern coast 50,000 years ago.

Artefacts found in Pilbara cave show Aboriginal life in northern WA dates back 50,000 years

Professor Peter Veth, from the University of Western Australia, said the discovery was a culmination of two decades' work on the Pilbara coast. "I am genuinely excited. I think to be able to provide more firm evidence which reinforces Aboriginal origin narratives of deep-time occupation, which goes up to and beyond the 50,000-year range — that's exciting," Professor Veth said. The team used radio carbon dating and luminance testing to establish dates for dozens of artefacts unearthed at Boodie Cave, on the northern shore of Barrow Island, 50 kilometres off the Pilbara. They included spoons and cutting implements carved from shell, as well as beads thought to form necklaces. Remote cave off Western Australia reveals earliest Australians' coastal lifestyle. Opinion By Sean Ulm, Ingrid Ward, Peter Veth and Tiina Manne Updated Archaeological excavations in a remote island cave off north-west Australia reveal incredible details of the early use by people of the continent's now-submerged coast.

Remote cave off Western Australia reveals earliest Australians' coastal lifestyle

Our latest study reveals that at lower sea levels, this island was used as a hunting shelter between about 50,000 and 30,000 years ago, and then as a residential base for family groups by 8,000 years ago. As the dates for the first Aboriginal arrival in Australia are pushed back further and further, it is becoming clear how innovative the original colonists must have been. The earliest known archaeological sites so far reported are found in inland Australia, such as Warratyi rock shelter in the Flinders Ranges and Madjedbebe in Arnhem Land. These places are a long way from the sea, and were once even more so when past sea levels were lower and the coast even more distant. But we do know that the earliest Australians were originally seafarers. Island dig. Indigenous influence on AFL creation confirmed by historical transcripts, historian says. Updated In a week when AFL vilification again raised its ugly head in the media, further evidence has emerged about the game's Indigenous origins, with a historian citing transcripts she says proves a key Aboriginal influence.

Indigenous influence on AFL creation confirmed by historical transcripts, historian says

Key points: Transcripts prove Indigenous game Marngrook was played where AFL inventor Tom Wills grew upMarngrook and Australian Rules Football are strikingly similarAFL sticking to official history denying Marngrook influence Monash University historian Professor Jenny Hocking found transcripts placing Indigenous football, commonly known today as Marngrook, firmly in the Western district of Victoria where Australian rules founder Tom Wills grew up. How our species got smarter — through a rush of blood to the head. Opinion By Roger Seymour, University of Adelaide Posted Anthropologists have been curious about the evolution of human intelligence for many decades.

How our species got smarter — through a rush of blood to the head

The main lines of research have involved archaeological finds concerning the use of fire, tools and so on. But what about looking for evidence in fossil skulls, the place where the brain resided? Did Indigenous warriors influence the development of Australian rules football? Opinion By Robert Pascoe and Gerardo Papalia Posted There are aspects of Australian rules football that never fail to puzzle the uninitiated.

Did Indigenous warriors influence the development of Australian rules football?

The game has its straight up and down plays — the long-kicking and high-marking that seem to give the contest a sense of order and clarity of purpose. But then there are the moments of pure anarchy, as the ball falls to the ground, players knock it forward or sideways, and a quick handball or a short, driving kick produces an unexpected result. Ancient dental plaque shows some Neanderthals ate plants and used drugs - Science News. Posted We might think of Neanderthals as meat-eating cave men, but DNA from prehistoric dental plaque shows some of our palaeo cousins were vegetarians who used plant-based medicines.

Ancient dental plaque shows some Neanderthals ate plants and used drugs - Science News

Key points: DNA confirms Aboriginal people have a long-lasting connection to country - Science News. Updated Members of the Stolen Generations may finally find a way back to their country, thanks to new research that reveals differences in Aboriginal DNA can be linked to specific geographic areas.

DNA confirms Aboriginal people have a long-lasting connection to country - Science News

Key points Study analysed DNA of people forcibly relocated to Queensland and South AustraliaAfter Aboriginal people migrated to and then around Australia about 50,000 years ago, some populations stayed in specific regionsAuthor says findings explains Aboriginal people's metaphysical connection to countryFindings could help members of Stolen Generations trace their families back to country. Fossilised filaments from hot ocean vent claimed to be earliest evidence of life on Earth - Science News. Updated Tiny mineralised filaments smaller than a human hair found in rocks more than 3.77 billion years old may be evidence of one of the oldest lifeforms on Earth.

Fossilised filaments from hot ocean vent claimed to be earliest evidence of life on Earth - Science News

Key points Underwater vents may have supported life very early in Earth's 4.5-billion-year historyAnalysis of ancient iron-rich rocks from vents has found evidence of filaments and tubes that resemble modern microorganisms surrounding ventsBut one scientist argues the filaments may have been created by geological processes. Bowl of witchetty grubs. Almost all living people outside of Africa trace back to a single migration more than 50,000 years ago. Australian Aborigines have long been cast as a people apart.

Almost all living people outside of Africa trace back to a single migration more than 50,000 years ago

Although Australia is halfway around the world from our species’s accepted birthplace in Africa, the continent is nevertheless home to some of the earliest undisputed signs of modern humans outside Africa, and Aborigines have unique languages and cultural adaptations. Some researchers have posited that the ancestors of the Aborigines were the first modern humans to surge out of Africa, spreading swiftly eastward along the coasts of southern Asia thousands of years before a second wave of migrants populated Eurasia. Not so, according to a trio of genomic studies, the first to analyze many full genomes from Australia and New Guinea. Feathered dinosaur tail discovered in lump of amber from a market in Myanmar - Science News. Prehistoric claw marks help Flinders University scientists unearth more on extinct Australian lion. Updated Prehistoric claw marks inside a Western Australian cave have helped Adelaide scientists find out more about an animal that before going extinct was Australia's top predator.

The Thylacoleo carnifex is an extinct marsupial lionScientists discovered claw marks belonging to the lion in WAClaw marks show lions were excellent climbers and reared their young in caves For 150 years scientists have been trying to learn more about the marsupial lion that roamed the continent more than 40,000 years ago. Otherwise known as a Thylacoleo carnifex, the Australian marsupial lion weighed between 80 and 100 kilograms and was believed to have powerful jaws and large, sharp claws.

Flinders University palaeontologist Gavin Prideaux said he now knew the mammal was a fierce predator, much like a lion or a hyena in other parts of the world. WA cave dig uncovers evidence of human activity dating back 25,000 years. Updated Archaeologists say evidence of human activity found in a cave in Western Australia proves Aboriginal people lived in the area thousands of years earlier than previously thought. Radiocarbon tests carried out on samples collected during an excavation at Yellabidde Cave, a limestone formation in the state's Mid West, showed people were at the site at least 25,000 years ago.

Archaeologist and PhD candidate Carly Monks said that was around 15,000 years earlier than previous evidence suggested. The world's oldest observatory? How Aboriginal astronomy provides clues to ancient life. Updated An ancient Aboriginal site at a secret location in the Victorian bush could be the oldest astronomical observatory in the world, pre-dating Stonehenge and even the Great Pyramids of Giza. Researchers say site could date back more than 11,000 yearsBelieve stone arrangement mapped out the movements of the sunSite could also disprove notion that first Australians were uniformly nomadic hunter-gatherers Scientists studying the Wurdi Youang stone arrangement say it could date back more than 11,000 years and provide clues into the origins of agriculture.

Mystery surrounds 'advanced' society living in Jordanian desert over 6,000 years ago. Updated Archaeologists have uncovered three ancient, fortified settlements and what may be the earliest evidence of artificial irrigation systems while excavating in the basalt desert of Jordan. The sites, which date back approximately 6,000 years to the late fifth and fourth millennia BCE, were located atop volcanic hills at the edge of north-eastern Jordan during surveys between 2010 and 2015. The archaeologist heading the study for the Orient Department of the German Archaeological Institute said the permanent settlements were a surprising find, and conflicted with earlier hypotheses that pastoralists had only visited the area for specific times of the year — usually during the wet season.

"The interesting thing is that this remote region comes suddenly into our focus as an area where, at a very early stage, high technology either developed or appeared," Bernd Muller-Neuhof told the ABC. World-first genome study reveals rich history of Aboriginal Australians - Science News. World's oldest known fossils found in Greenland push evidence for life back by 220 million years - Science News. The Genographic Project by National Geographic - Human Migration, Population Genetics.

Did early campfires trigger the emergence of tuberculosis? - Science News. Posted Fire brought warmth and comfort to early humans but may also have triggered the emergence of deadly tuberculosis, Australian researchers suggest. Key points Tuberculosis first emerged in humans in Africa then spread to animalsMystery about how a benign microorganism became a killerHypothesis suggests fire increased human interaction and smoke made lungs more susceptible to disease Smoke-damaged lungs, as well as the closeness of humans around a campfire, could have created the ideal conditions for tuberculosis to mutate from a harmless soil bacterium into our number one bacterial killer, according to the researchers' data model. The model, published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, showed controlled use of fire would have increased the likelihood of tuberculosis emerging by several orders of magnitude. The rise of tuberculosis While the date of the earliest use of fire is also subject to debate, Dr Tanaka suggested that it probably came before tuberculosis.

Digging deep to discover the first Australians - ABC Kimberley WA - Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Researcher make rock-art breakthrough. Jack pettigrew, dna, rock art, bradshaw. Kimberley rock art yielding ancient secrets to high tech methods - ABC Kimberley WA - Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Australian Story - 14/10/2002: Rock Heart. Australian Story - 14/10/2002: Rock Heart. Catalyst: Denisovans - ABC TV Science. The Earliest Human Migration. Animated map shows how humans migrated across the globe. Human Prehistory 101 (Part 1 of 3): Out of (Eastern) Africa. Philistine cemetery uncovered in archaeological dig in Israel, Goliath's people were 'normal sized' How China is rewriting the book on human origins. DeAgostini/Getty The reconstructed skull of Peking Man, the fossil that launched discussions of human origins in China. On the outskirts of Beijing, a small limestone mountain named Dragon Bone Hill rises above the surrounding sprawl.

Along the northern side, a path leads up to some fenced-off caves that draw 150,000 visitors each year, from schoolchildren to grey-haired pensioners. NAIDOC 2016: Forget About Flinders atlas preserves Yanyuwa culture and songlines. Stone tools tell story of intrepid Polynesian mariners - Science News. Climate drove demise of South America's giant beasts - Science News. Hobbit discovery: Hopes 700,000-year-old find could shed new light on evolution. Astronomy the centre point of Indigenous culture, researcher says - Science News.

New DNA technology confirms Aboriginal people as first Australians - Science News. Ancient rice 'first evidence' Madagascan ancestors crossed Indian Ocean from South-East Asia - Science News. Neanderthals built complex underground structures 175,000 years ago. World's oldest known ground-edge stone axe fragments found in Western Australia - Science News. Teeth marks on bone evidence that early humans in North Africa were eaten by animals - Science News. South America's prehistoric people spread in two waves like 'invasive species' - Science News. Genetic map reveals impact of interbreeding with ancient Denisovans and Neanderthals - Science News. Genetic and Linguistic Data about Human Migrations. Partial connectivity increases cultural accumulation within groups. Out of Darkness (1984) clip 1 on ASO.

Report - 9/1/2001: Scientists question the theory of human evolution. In the Underworld: Tasmania's caving history. New species of ancient tropical flower found in amber from the Dominican Republic - Science. Fear of vengeful omniscient gods may have helped human societies expand - Science. First humans to arrive in Australia behind huge flightless bird's extinction, scientists believe. What is the ‘Dreamtime’ or the ‘Dreaming’?

Woolly mammoth remains indicate humans conquered the Arctic at least 45,000 years ago - Science. Stone tools found on Sulawesi in Indonesia 'made by ancient humans at least 118,000 years ago' - Science. Study of ancient skulls from Vanuatu cemetery sheds light on Polynesian migration, scientists say. 14,000-year-old thighbone renews mystery over identity of 'Red Deer Cave people' - Science. Ancient crystals reveal life could be millions of years older than first thought, international scientists say. Before Civilization - Ancient Civilizations for Kids. New species of human relative, Homo naledi, found in underground graveyard in Cradle of Humankind in South Africa. New species of human relative, Homo naledi, found in underground graveyard in Cradle of Humankind in South Africa.

French teen finds 560,000-year-old human tooth at prehistoric Tautavel site. Human life in WA's Mid West existed 30,000 years ago, archaeologists say. Visit Mungo National Park. Mungo Man › Science Features (ABC Science) Mungo dna, Search the ABC. DNA confirms coastal trek to Australia › News in Science (ABC Science) Mungo Man › Science Features (ABC Science) DNA traces Aboriginal Australian history › News in Science (ABC Science) Report - 9/1/2001: Scientists question the theory of human evolution. Discovery of ancient stone tools in Kenya dating back 3.3 million years challenges story of mankind.