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Fashion industry joins with not-for-profit organisation Avenue to help those with disabilities get jobs. Stephanie Trinh-Tran has faced more obstacles than most in following her dream to work in the fashion industry.

Fashion industry joins with not-for-profit organisation Avenue to help those with disabilities get jobs

Key points: Avenue provides a space for people with disabilities to do work in teams, while being supportedFounder Laura O'Reilly says the enterprise is trying to redefine work in AustraliaMs O'Reilly established the not-for-profit after seeing her brother constantly denied work The 21-year-old, who lives with autism, was knocked back from fashion courses until she came to not-for-profit disability organisation Avenue, where she works in an order fulfilment team for a clothing label.

"I love the clothes, the prints, the styles and the colours," she said. Stephanie's mother Julie thought her daughter might never break into the industry. Teachers were reluctant to take her on because of the support she required to understand tasks, but Julie was confident in her daughter's ability. "He saw himself as leaving school and, like his older siblings, going out and working. " Starting a successful small business as someone living with a disability.

It wasn't just Kyal Fairbairn's love of coffee that led to him becoming a passionate coffee cart operator.

Starting a successful small business as someone living with a disability

Key points: More two million Australians of working age have a disabilityOf those, less than half have a jobLess than one in five run their own business He turned to running his own business after tiring of being treated unfairly in the workplace because of his intellectual disability. "From the beginning, starting up and running my own business was not going to be a simple task," Mr Fairbairn said.

But while it hasn't been easy, he loves it. "The most satisfactory part of my job is that I am my own boss and that I have the ability to run things the way I want. " I was perfect for the job, but I couldn't even get into the building. Here's why. Imagine you're on your way to a job interview.

I was perfect for the job, but I couldn't even get into the building. Here's why

You've already been told by your potential employer that your resumé is the best they have ever seen. The employer has every intention of giving you the job. The interview is just a formality. But, when you arrive for the interview, you find yourself unable to enter the building. Because of this, no matter how perfect you are for the position, you won't get the job. This is exactly what happened to me last month. Career-changing ex-teacher turns tiny cafe into award-winning mega business. Opening a small cafe with coffee and some sandwiches was her husband's dream, not Toni Vorenas's.

Career-changing ex-teacher turns tiny cafe into award-winning mega business

"[But] before we opened, he actually decided that wasn't his dream anymore," Ms Vorenas said. "Because he'd supported me a lot throughout my teaching career and my studies, I thought in return I would run the cafe for 12 months for him. " Without meaning to, 12 months has turned into 12 years and a two-site award-winning bakery and cafe serving 150 customers from two commercial kitchens, a bar and function room. Determined to find purpose in a corporate world, the former deputy principal has devoted her business to employing and empowering people from a wide mix of backgrounds and credits that diversity to Metro's success.

Yeppoon cafe trains and employs people with disability, Emily urges others to give it a go. When many people are hitting snooze their alarms, Emily Slotosch jumps out of bed to prepare for her shift at the local cafe.

Yeppoon cafe trains and employs people with disability, Emily urges others to give it a go

The 27-year-old never thought she would work two hospitality jobs. "I am so proud of myself," she said. Ms Slotosch has a disability, which she describes as ability. "It makes me shine, it makes me happy … it makes me proud. Kris Hargrave owns and manages the Yeppoon cafe where Ms Slotosch works one day a week.

Jobseekers with a disability are often asked to declare it, but more firms are moving away from just 'ticking the box' For Leanne Del Toso, being hired for her skill set rather than her disability made her feel empowered.

Jobseekers with a disability are often asked to declare it, but more firms are moving away from just 'ticking the box'

But in the past, she said ticking that box "made her feel insignificant as a human being" and her disability became "the highlight of who I am". "I am not ashamed of being a disabled woman, in fact I am very proud," she said. But she said she was careful how she answered questions when applying for jobs, as people could have preconceived ideas about what disability means, looks and feels like to others. A corporate social responsibility administrator at a major health insurer, the Paralympian silver medal winner said she only ticked the disability box if it was part of the criteria for actually doing the job. Masking when you have autism can help you blend in, but you might not be doing yourself any favours. The practice of someone being undiagnosed on the autism spectrum and masking their autism is not as uncommon as you might think.

Masking when you have autism can help you blend in, but you might not be doing yourself any favours

Key points: Masking can be a way of "camouflaging" your autismPeople with autism can be motivated to do it fit inBut it can be damaging in the long term and exhausting to keep it up For 40 years, I hid my autism from the world as a way of ensuring those around me would accept me. I mimicked their social interactions and behaviours and sailed through life. Disability royal commission hears about barriers to finding employment faced by people like Yuri - ABC News. Yuri Sianski has spent the last 25 years trying to find a job — and his father has told the disability royal commission the situation is a "shameful cul-de-sac of neglect".

Disability royal commission hears about barriers to finding employment faced by people like Yuri - ABC News

The disability royal commission will hear from more than 20 witnesses this week on the barriers people with disability face finding and maintaining employment Edward Sianski said his son Yuri, who lives with schizophrenia, has been "exploited" in the past The royal commission heard earlier this week that Australians with disability are more likely to be over-educated for their jobs, have lower earnings and poor job satisfaction Yuri, 47, from Hobart, lives with schizophrenia and has trained as a bartender and a cleaner but has only ever managed to find unskilled work.

Mr Sianski and his father gave evidence together via video link from Hobart to the disability royal commission hearing into the barriers faced by people with disability to find and maintain employment. "I felt bereft of any support from outside. Small changes you can make to help make the lives of autistic people easier - ABC News. Having a casual conversation can be the most stressful part of some people's day.

Small changes you can make to help make the lives of autistic people easier - ABC News

Sheree Somers knows what this feels like and she has some advice for us all to make things better. The world is an incredibly overwhelming and confusing place for me. Bullied, belittled and dumped for having cerebral palsy, Dale wouldn't change a thing about herself - ABC News. Dale Weller has had to fight, figuratively and literally, to be treated just like everyone else.

Bullied, belittled and dumped for having cerebral palsy, Dale wouldn't change a thing about herself - ABC News

She wants others with disability to know they can still embrace themselves when others won't. How can you value yourself when others go out of their way to tell you you're not worth anything? My life with cerebral palsy (CP) hasn't been easy. Not so much because of the CP, but because of how others treat me when they see I'm disabled. My story starts on the family farm at Mundubbera in Queensland, back in the 1950s. When my Mum brought me home from hospital, my older brother, Dr Mark Weller, recalls "the tiniest little yellow baby who cried a lot, particularly at night".

ABC reporter Nas Campanella writes about a shocking interaction on a Sydney train - ABC News. Sometimes when I'm out in public I can feel you staring. Some of you go quiet as I walk past. Some of you even talk about me when I'm in earshot. Surprise! I can hear you. It may also surprise you to know that I catch public transport. The budding neuroscientist and poet with cerebral palsy who wants to become a doctor - ABC News. When Jerusha was a child with cerebral palsy, doctors told her parents she would never walk or talk. But today at 25, she's hoping to become a doctor herself and help others with disabilities.

Jerusha has some challenges — her speech can sometimes be slurred, her arms and legs can make involuntary movements, she can have difficulty walking on uneven ground, and gets tired easily. Becky the Paralympic Barbie was not the only gift 20 years ago during Sydney's Games - ABC News. Let's take a trip down memory lane, shall we? It's October 2000, and while most of Australia is tuning in to the Sydney Paralympics, I'm a little preoccupied because my parents have just gifted me the only present any six-year-old girl ever wants. It's another Barbie doll, and I'm even more excited than ever because she looks like me — a wheelchair user. The doll's name is Becky and, while there were two previous editions of this doll, Becky is the first official Paralympic Barbie. I used to race her against my brother and his skateboard. He won, but so did I.

Actor Julia Hales, ABC's first TV host who is living with Down syndrome, explores the issue of prenatal testing in new documentary - ABC News. "I want everyone to know that people with Down syndrome are capable of living in the world and reaching their goals. I want their voices to be heard and to make the world a better place for them. " — Actor Julia Hales Julia Hales is a passionate person, I saw that the moment I met her. She's a Perth-based actor who co-wrote the award-winning play You Know We Belong Together, which featured at the Perth Festival I heard about Julia through theatre director Chris Kohn, who was working with her to develop a play called Screens looking at prenatal screening. It coincided with the Federal Government considering changes to prenatal screening to include a DNA blood test on the Medicare benefits scheme.

On the 20th anniversary of the Sydney Paralympics, the stars of the Games share their memories - ABC News. In 2000, Australia won the summer Paralympic Games, earning a whopping 63 gold medals on home soil in Sydney. Twenty years on, those winners spoke to the ABC as they looked back at the event they say led to a major shift in Australia’s perception of disabilities. Louise Sauvage Twenty years ago Paralympian Louise Sauvage was one of the biggest stars of the Sydney 2000 games. Now she "couldn't think of anything better" than training the athletes of the future. The wheelchair racer picked up two gold and one silver to help Australia finish on the top of the competition's medal table.

The now-47-year-old has moved into coaching, backing fellow wheelchair athlete Madison de Rozario ahead of Tokyo in 2021 — and gold is firmly in their sights. "I think the biggest highlight for me now and the biggest buzz is being part of someone else's journey, helping them to achieve their goals," Sauvage said. Looking back on the Sydney games, Sauvage said the opening ceremony was a moment she would never forget. Telehealth during the COVID-19 pandemic shows the 'anti-social loner' autism stereotype is a myth - ABC News. Short film Safety Net screened virtually as part of the 67th Sydney Film Festival, and its Canberra star hopes it will inspire others with a disability - ABC News. Learning how to make your workplace more disability friendly — from people who live with a disability - ABC News.

Blind piano tuner Graeme McGowan laments loss of trade suited to sight-impaired people. Updated 25 minutes agoTue 24 Mar 2020, 4:30am. Activ Esperance closure leaves 17 people with a disability out of work and families left 'dumbfounded' Posted Thu at 11:03pmThu 5 Mar 2020, 11:03pm Michael Rule is 44 years old, a passionate West Coast Eagles fan and an avid collector of the team's memorabilia, he loves swimming and going out for dinner with his friends.

Key points: For people with autism like Nick McAllister, one of the biggest challenges is finding a job. Opinion By Nick McAllister Posted 27 Jul 2019, 12:25amSat 27 Jul 2019, 12:25am Four years ago, at the age of 40, I was diagnosed as being on the autism spectrum. How Lego therapy can be a 'massive win' for kids with autism and their families. Posted about an hour agoSun 4 Aug 2019, 12:50am Seth Lester places the last block of Lego on a Jurassic Park-themed dinosaur, one of the creations he is preparing to display at the Autism Lego Expo in Mackay, north Queensland. Key points: Employers urged to rethink workers with autism to help rectify chronic unemployment problem. Posted about 4 hours agoSun 28 Jul 2019, 12:11am As people with autism struggle to counter an unemployment rate of more than 30 per cent — six times the national level — disability groups are calling on employers to rethink how they can tap the potential of this group of prospective workers.

Brisbane model Madeline Stuart returns to where her international career began. Updated 6 minutes agoWed 24 Jul 2019, 11:28pm. Anxiety kept Sophie jobless for years, then she found work in buzzing Hobart cafe. Updated 48 minutes agoMon 8 Jul 2019, 11:58pm. Josh Meredith's small business is helping change community attitudes about Down syndrome. Updated yesterday at 4:09amThu 18 Apr 2019, 4:09am Josh Meredith, 25, lives with Down syndrome and is helping change attitudes towards disability in the workplace in his community of Albury-Wodonga on the border of New South Wales and Victoria. Hannah Gadsby to use phone pouches to stop people filming her shows. Updated about 8 hours agoTue 26 Mar 2019, 2:06pm Hannah Gadsby is not one to shy away from challenging her audience's beliefs, and now the comedian will also be challenging their phone use.

The Heights and sassy schoolgirl Sabine, brought to life with 'authentic' casting. Updated about 2 hours agoThu 21 Feb 2019, 10:08pm. Australian-first program to help struggling artists find a steady income. Tropfest 2019 finalists include film by company creating roles for actors with disabilities. Charges laid after man accidentally drank poison from Coke bottle on central coast. Waste paper kitty litter offers employment for north Queenslanders with disability.