Google search operators

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Google Search Operators. The following table lists the search operators that work with each Google search service.

Google Search Operators

Click on an operator to jump to its description — or, to read about all of the operators, simply scroll down and read all of this page. The following is an alphabetical list of the search operators. This list includes operators that are not officially supported by Google and not listed in Google’s online help. Each entry typically includes the syntax, the capabilities, and an example. Some of the search operators won’t work as intended if you put a space between the colon (:) and the subsequent query word.

Allinanchor: If you start your query with allinanchor:, Google restricts results to pages containing all query terms you specify in the anchor text on links to the page. Anchor text is the text on a page that is linked to another web page or a different place on the current page. Allintext: allintitle: allinurl: In URLs, words are often run together. Author: cache: define: ext: filetype: group: id: inanchor: Using advanced search - Gmail Help. Advanced search operators are query words or symbols that perform special actions in Gmail search.

Using advanced search - Gmail Help

These operators allow you to find what you're looking for quickly and accurately. They can also be used to set up filters so you can organize your inbox automatically. Some of the most useful operators are listed below. You can also refine your search by clicking the arrow in the search box. Boolean operators You can use boolean operators such as 'OR' when searching in Gmail. For example, to look for messages from username@gmail.com and messages that contain the subject line 'Meeting reminder', you can enter 'username@gmail.com OR meeting reminder' in your Gmail search box. Using these along with Gmail's advanced operators can be a great way of making your search criteria more powerful. The 'or' function in Gmail is represented by 'OR,' and the 'not' function is represented by a minus (-). How to Search YouTube Like a PRO with Google Advanced Operators.

But with the resource being enormous comes one issue: it is almost impossible to search it efficiently.

How to Search YouTube Like a PRO with Google Advanced Operators

And there are no official guides on how to search YouTube to actually find something. However, not many people know how flexible YouTube’s search function actually is. About 2 years ago (maybe more) Google started operating YouTube search — if you haven’t noticed Google Video Search and YouTube search have even identical (advanced) search options. And with Google coming into play, there turns out to be some really tricky and smart ways to search YouTube using Google search operators.

The Issue YouTube (like Google Video Search) has some handy sorting options that allow you to find videos by: Relevancy (based on your search query);Upload date (to find most recent videos);View count (to find the most viewed videos);Rating (to find the highest rated videos). I love using the latter two options to look through the most popular YouTube videos on any topic. Let’s compare: 1. 2. 3.