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Jameco Electronics
HOWTO make your own Wiimote peripheral | Windmeadow Labs
nunchuck
STM Trademark Video of wireless fencing Beijing 2008 Beijing 2008 - MSI - BRONZE - Pillet FRA v Covaliu ROU - 1 of 2 Beijing 2008 - MSI - BRONZE - Pillet FRA v Covaliu ROU - 2 of 2 Beijing 2008 - MSI - GOLD - Zhong CHN v Lopez FRA - 1 of 2 Beijing 2008 - MSI - GOLD - Zhong CHN v Lopez FRA - 2 of 2 STM Trademark
WiTricity WiTricity WiTricity is an American engineering company that manufactures devices for wireless energy transfer using resonant energy transfer (oscillating magnetic fields). History[edit] The term WiTricity was used for a project that took place at MIT, led by Marin Soljačić in 2007.[1][2] The MIT researchers successfully demonstrated the ability to power a 60 watt light bulb wirelessly, using two 5-turn copper coils of 60 cm (24 in) diameter, that were 2 m (7 ft) away, at roughly 45% efficiency.[3] The coils were designed to resonate together at 9.9 MHz (≈ wavelength 30 m) and were oriented along the same axis. One was connected inductively to a power source, and the other one to a bulb. The setup powered the bulb on, even when the direct line of sight was blocked using a wooden panel. Researchers were able to power a 60 watt light bulb at roughly 90% efficiency at a distance of 3 feet[citation needed].
Arduino - HomePage

Arduino - HomePage

What Arduino can do Arduino can sense the environment by receiving input from a variety of sensors and can affect its surroundings by controlling lights, motors, and other actuators. The microcontroller on the board is programmed using the Arduino programming language (based on Wiring) and the Arduino development environment (based on Processing). Arduino projects can be stand-alone or they can communicate with software running on a computer (e.g.
Resonant energy transfer