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Mellor, "Problems of Perception" Problems of Perception Anne K.

Mellor, "Problems of Perception"

Mellor Chapter 7 of Mary Shelley: Her Life, Her Fiction, Her Monsters (New York: Methuen, 1988), 127-40. Mellor, "Usurping the Female" Usurping the Female Anne K.

Mellor, "Usurping the Female"

Mellor Chapter 6 of Mary Shelley: Her Life, Her Fiction, Her Monsters (New York: Methuen, 1988), pp. 115-26 {115} In constituting nature as female -- "I pursued nature to her hiding places" (49) -- Victor Frankenstein participates in a gendered construction of the universe whose negative ramifications are everywhere apparent in the novel.

The uninhibited scientific penetration and technological exploitation of female nature is only one dimension of a patriarchal encoding of the female as passive and possessable, the willing receptacle of male desire. A Cultural History of Frankenstein: Curiosity and Gender. Passion and curiosity: two things that women of the 19th century were feared to possess.

A Cultural History of Frankenstein: Curiosity and Gender

The mindset of the time was that these two things must be suppressed and controlled. Disastrous things were expected to occur if a woman's passions and lusts were not tamed. However, in Frankenstein, Mary Shelley contrastly has us look towards the opposite gender as the source of curious behaviors. Jessica Hale. Oates, "Frankenstein's Fallen Angel" "Frankenstein's Fallen Angel" Joyce Carol Oates Critical Inquiry, 10 (1984), 543-54.

Oates, "Frankenstein's Fallen Angel"

Mellor, "Problems of Perception" Hogle, "Otherness in Frankenstein" Otherness in Frankenstein: The Confinement/Autonomy of Fabrication Jerrold E.

Hogle, "Otherness in Frankenstein"

Hogle From Structuralist Review, 2 (1980), 20-45 The universe is a monster of energy, without beginning or end; a fixed and brazen quantity of energy which grows neither bigger nor smaller, which does not consume itself, but only alters its face . . . this, my Dionysian world of eternal self-creation, of eternal self-destruction. . . .

440 1556 1 SM. Lamb, "Frankenstein and Milton's Monstrous Myth" Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and Milton's Monstrous Myth John B.

Lamb, "Frankenstein and Milton's Monstrous Myth"

Lamb Nineteenth-Century Literature, 47:3 (December 1992), 303-19. Hetherington, "Creator and Created in Frankenstein" Creator and Created in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein Naomi Hetherington Keats-Shelley Review 11 (1997): 1-39.

Hetherington, "Creator and Created in Frankenstein"

Monster of Theory: The “Quest” for Mythology and Archetypes in Frankenstein. Northrop Frye concedes in The Archetypes of Literature that his tables of archetypes are “not only elementary but grossly over-simplified” (1315), but these tables can still be of use in analyzing Shelley’s Frankenstein.

Monster of Theory: The “Quest” for Mythology and Archetypes in Frankenstein

One reason why Frye’s examples translate well to Shelley’s piece is that Frankenstein is conspicuously mythological. It is, consciously, a creation myth, a myth of the fall, and, in some ways, “the return of chaos.” An Essay Concerning Human Understanding - Wikipedia. An Essay Concerning Human Understanding is a work by John Locke concerning the foundation of human knowledge and understanding.

An Essay Concerning Human Understanding - Wikipedia

It first appeared in 1689 (although dated 1690) with the printed title An Essay Concerning Humane Understanding. He describes the mind at birth as a blank slate (tabula rasa, although he did not use those actual words) filled later through experience. The essay was one of the principal sources of empiricism in modern philosophy, and influenced many enlightenment philosophers, such as David Hume and George Berkeley. An Essay Concerning Human Understanding - Wikipedia. Romanticism. Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. A selective list of online literary criticism for Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, favoring signed articles by recognized scholars, articles published in reviewed sources, and web sites that adhere to the Modern Language Association Guidelines for Authors of Web Pages Main Page | 19th-Century Literature | 19th-Century Novel | About LiteraryHistory.com Anderson, Robert.

Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

Anderson considers theories of work and leisure time in Frankenstein. Cantor, "The Nightmare of Romantic Idealism" The Nightmare of Romantic Idealism Chapter 3 of Creature and Creator: Myth-Making and English Romanticism (Cambridge and New York: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1984), 103-32 Paul Cantor Frankenstein has as much claim to mythic status as any story ever invented by a single author. The original novel continues to be read by a wide audience, and has of course spawned innumerable adaptations, imitations, and sequels.1 Through its cinematic incarnations, the Frankenstein story has ingrained itself on the popular imagination. Frankenstein.