What novels that came out in the last 5 years are must-reads? : books So, yes, I also found the concept creepy, but it was the execution I found lacking. I couldn't shake the idea that it was written by my mom: someone who is afraid of things she doesn't understand. I love Dave Eggers, I love his work outside of his writing, I will buy his books, support his 826 projects subscribe to the Believer, and buy as much McSweeney's stuff as I can. That being said...this book, man, this book always felt like it was being written by someone who was told about the internet and hadn't experienced it. Frankly, the Circle seemed like a pretty great place to work: you can put your parents on your insurance? Sign me up! What novels that came out in the last 5 years are must-reads? : books
Not sure what to think.... Am I enjoying these? : Lovecraft I never read Lovecraft as a kid, so I'm starting fresh at 32 thanks to the influence of "Welcome to Night Vale". I I've now read a whole bunch of them, which I'll list here. "The Silver Key", "He", "The Crawling Chaos", "The Colour Out of Space", "Nyarlathotep", "In the Walls of Eryx", "Fungi from Yuggoth", "The Unnamable", "The Thing on the Doorstep", "The Shunned House", "The Rats in the Walls", "The Quest of Iranon", "The Nameless City", "The Dunwich Horror", "The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath" (which I gave up on), and "At the Mountains of Madness", which I'm currently in the middle of, and really liking.... Not sure what to think.... Am I enjoying these? : Lovecraft
The sci-fi novel "Son of Sedonia" took me 6 years and the best of my ability to complete. What success I've had, I owe to the Reddit and Imgur communities. Here is the eBook, and some of my concept art, for free. Thank you all! : scifi In December 2012, I fulfilled my dream of finishing and publishing a full sci-fi novel. Inspired by Blade Runner, City of God, and Black Hawk Down, Son of Sedonia was written to be both an exciting and realistic projection of our society into the year 2080AD, told through the interweaving experiences of characters in each level of that society. But by March 2013, downloads had dropped to the low single digits (given my crap marketing skills), and the future of my life's work seemed grim. That is until, on a whim, I posted my cover illustration on r/pics. The sci-fi novel "Son of Sedonia" took me 6 years and the best of my ability to complete. What success I've had, I owe to the Reddit and Imgur communities. Here is the eBook, and some of my concept art, for free. Thank you all! : scifi
Ernest Hemingway once said “All American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn. There was nothing before. There has been nothing as good since.” While many have challenged Ernest’s view, there’s no denying that over a career spanning more than three decades, Papa became a master of his craft. In his lifetime, he published seven novels, six short story collections, and two non-fiction works. His last major work of fiction, The Old Man and the Sea won him the 1953 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and was cited by the Nobel Committee as contributing to the awarding of him the Nobel Prize in Literature a year later. Hemingway on writing: 7 quotes all book lovers should read Hemingway on writing: 7 quotes all book lovers should read
Top Guardian Top 1000 Books on Loved.la
What is a good book to completely immerse yourself in? : books
The list: 100 Great Science Fiction Stories by Women | It Doesn't Have To Be Right... Now let the arguing begin… The list below contains 100 pieces of short fiction – short stories, novelettes and novellas – by women writers, published between 1927 and 2012. Each author appears only once. The stories are by no means the best by each writer. The list: 100 Great Science Fiction Stories by Women | It Doesn't Have To Be Right...
The Fault in Our Stars Plot[edit] Hazel explains the magnificence of An Imperial Affliction: It is a novel about a girl named Anna who has cancer, and it's the only account she's read of living with cancer that matches her experience. She describes how the novel maddeningly ends midsentence, denying the reader closure about the fate of the novel’s characters. She speculates about the novel’s mysterious author, Peter Van Houten, who fled to Amsterdam after the novel was published and hasn’t been heard from since. A week after Hazel and Augustus discuss the literary meaning of An Imperial Affliction, Augustus miraculously reveals he tracked down Van Houten's assistant, Lidewij, and through her he's managed to start an email correspondence with the reclusive author. He shares Van Houten's letter with Hazel, and she devises a list of questions to send Van Houten, hoping to clear up the novel’s ambiguous conclusion.

The Fault in Our Stars

flowers FOR algernon
s ultimate book guide Need a last-minute gift? Or sitting on a gift card and need a great book to read over the holiday break? You could check out our What To Read Awards for the top-10 books by our Laura Miller as well as our favorite critics. Or, you could get some recommendations straight from the authors of some of our best books of 2012. s ultimate book guide
Tim O’Reilly’s Key to Creating the Next Big Thing | Wired Business Tech mogul Tim O’ReillyPhoto: Jason Madara One of the marquee attractions at the MIT Media Lab is a camera that can take photographs of objects sitting out of sight, around a corner. It’s the result of years of sophisticated science. Tim O’Reilly’s Key to Creating the Next Big Thing | Wired Business
The New Space Opera
[Looking for] stories where the discovery or creation of machine intelligence does not doom humanity. : books
The United States of YA | Epic Reads
Fashionable Nonsense Fashionable Nonsense: Postmodern Intellectuals' Abuse of Science (French: Impostures Intellectuelles), published in the UK as Intellectual Impostures, is a book by Alan Sokal and Jean Bricmont. Sokal is best known for the Sokal Affair, in which he submitted a deliberately absurd article[1] to Social Text, a critical theory journal, and was able to get it published. The book was published in French in 1997, and in English in 1998; the English editions were revised for greater relevance to debates in the English-speaking world.[2] As part of the so-called science wars, the book criticizes postmodernism in academia for what it claims are misuses of scientific and mathematical concepts in postmodern writing. Fashionable Nonsense
Three Roads To Quantum Gravity (Science Masters): Lee Smolin: Amazon.com
What are your favorite essays and short stories? : books
Alan Kirby (writer) Alan Kirby (writer) Alan Kirby is the author of The Death of Postmodernism and Beyond and of Digimodernism: How New Technologies Dismantle the Postmodern and Reconfigure Our Culture, a book-length study of the same subject. Along with Nicolas Bourriaud, Gilles Lipovetsky, Raoul Eshelman, Timotheus Vermeulen and Robin van den Akker he is an analyst of culture in the aftermath of postmodernism.[1] Kirby believes that postmodernism began to retreat in the late 1990s, and has been superseded as a cultural dominant by what he calls "digimodernism" ("pseudomodernism" in the original article).[2]
The Color Trilogy 1 - Read The Color Trilogy 1 Online - Page 1
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By: Haris Ioannides - Armida Publications Going through this impressive list by onlineschools.org, I have to admit that the books mentioned definitely deserve being there. Kazantzakis is perhaps one of the most recognized Greek author and needs no introductions. I’d just like to add “Askitiki”, another of his books you should read which, personally, I find to be a masterpiece. Eugenides, an American of Greek Irish heritage, wrote a book you will never forget.

100 Books to read… & Armida Books - StumbleUpon

Background[edit] Greene initially formulated some of the ideas in The 48 Laws of Power while working as a writer in Hollywood and observing that today's power elite shared similar traits with powerful figures throughout history.[4] In 1995, Greene worked as a writer at Fabrica, an art and media school, and met a book packager named Joost Elffers.[6][9] Greene pitched a book about power to Elffers and six months later, Elffers requested that Greene write a treatment.[6] Although Greene was unhappy in his current job, he was comfortable and saw the time needed to write a proper book proposal as too risky.[11] However, at the time Greene was rereading his favorite biography about Julius Caesar and took inspiration from Caesar's decision to cross the Rubicon River and fight Pompey, thus inciting the Great Roman Civil War.[11] Greene would follow Caesar's example and write the treatment, which later became The 48 Laws of Power.[11] He would note this as the turning point of his life.[11]

The 48 Laws of Power - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - StumbleUpon

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