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Lisp (programming language) The interchangeability of code and data also gives Lisp its instantly recognizable syntax.

Lisp (programming language)

All program code is written as s-expressions, or parenthesized lists. A function call or syntactic form is written as a list with the function or operator's name first, and the arguments following; for instance, a function f that takes three arguments might be called using (f arg1 arg2 arg3). John McCarthy and Steve Russell Information Processing Language was the first AI language, from 1955 or 1956, and already included many of the concepts, such as list-processing and recursion, which came to be used in Lisp. McCarthy's original notation used bracketed "M-expressions" that would be translated into S-expressions. Lisp was first implemented by Steve Russell on an IBM 704 computer. During the 1980s and 1990s, a great effort was made to unify the work on new Lisp dialects (mostly successors to Maclisp like ZetaLisp and NIL (New Implementation of Lisp)) into a single language.

Lispbox. What is Lispbox?

Lispbox

Lispbox is an IDE for Common Lisp development. Actually, Lispbox is just a pre-configured packaging of the Emacs editing environment, SLIME (The Superior Lisp Interaction Mode for Emacs), the Quicklisp library manager, and the Clozure Common Lisp compiler. Combined, these components integrate to provide all of the functionality you would expect from an IDE, and more. Lispbox makes it quick and easy to get started using them.

Lispbox test builds To get Lispbox, simply download and extract the distribution for your platform. Known issues: The Mac OS X version currently requires OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard. Last updated: February 6, 2011 Contribute! If you would like to report a bug or make a suggestion, please send a message to the development mailing list. The code to build Lispbox is currently hosted on github. Compile on Mac OS X 10.4, for compatability Make separate versions for common Linux distributions, and a statically compiled version. Practical Common Lisp. This page, and the pages it links to, contain text of the Common Lisp book Practical Common Lisp published by Apress These pages now contain the final text as it appears in the book.

Practical Common Lisp

If you find errors in these pages, please send email to book@gigamonkeys.com. These pages will remain online in perpetuity—I hope they will serve as a useful introduction to Common Lisp for folks who are curious about Lisp but maybe not yet curious enough to shell out big bucks for a dead-tree book and a good Common Lisp tutorial for folks who want to get down to real coding right away. However, don't let that stop you from buying the printed version available from Apress at your favorite local or online bookseller. For the complete bookstore browsing experience, you can read the letter to the reader that appears on the back cover of the treeware edition of the book.

John McCarthy (computer scientist) McCarthy received many accolades and honors, such as the Turing Award for his contributions to the topic of AI, the United States National Medal of Science, and the Kyoto Prize.

John McCarthy (computer scientist)

John McCarthy was born in Boston, Massachusetts on September 4, 1927 to an Irish immigrant father and a Lithuanian Jewish immigrant mother,[2] John Patrick and Ida Glatt McCarthy. The family was obliged to relocate frequently during the Great Depression, until McCarthy's father found work as an organizer for the Amalgamated Clothing Workers in Los Angeles, California. McCarthy was suspended from Caltech for failure to attend physical education courses; he then served in the US Army and was readmitted, receiving a B.S. in Mathematics in 1948.[5] It was at Caltech that he attended a lecture by John von Neumann that inspired his future endeavors. McCarthy initially continued his studies at Caltech. He received a Ph.D. in Mathematics from Princeton University in 1951 as a student of Solomon Lefschetz.

Philip J. Intro to AI - Announcements. Python Programming Language – Official Website. Pyro, Python Robotics: Pyro. AIWisdom.com - Game AI Articles & Research.