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Fanfiction in Literacy Resources Page Links

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An expanded list of resources. to help teachers investigate and plan the use of fanfiction for literacy. This includes the resources included in our workshop references ( and others.

The Organization for Transformative Works. k8monster asked: Re: the new merch store: When you have the numbers, we'll be able to see how much profit goes back into merch and how much of it benefits the OTW, right? I assume some of it will have to fund more merch, but I'd guess the rest goes right back into the organization, yes? (PS: I want that pen. I want 5.) Hi k8monster Yes, all profits from the sale of any merchandise goes to the OTW. Yay for liking the pen! However if you want to work your way to 5 (or more!) Claudia Rebaza, Chair, OTW Communications. FanFiction (FanFictioneer) "I Do Not Own Gossip Girl": Examining the Relationship between Teens, Fan Fiction, and Gossip Girl - Tags: FAN fiction TEENAGERS in literature. Home » "I Do Not Own Gossip Girl": Examining the Relationship between Teens, Fan Fiction, and Gossip Girl Acta Mycologica;2013, Vol. 48 Issue 1, p38 Academic Journal The article discusses the written on fan fiction and teens to date that bring out the Gossip Girl to the creation of fan fiction.

It states that the teen writers use the Gossip Girl fan fiction to reach the goals and motivations of fan fiction writers. It also notes that the identity of a fan fiction writers are constructed through their writing and their online profile. Tags: FAN fiction; TEENAGERS in literature; TEENAGERS' writings; ONLINE profiling; YOUNG authors. Adolescents' anime-inspired 'fanfictions': An exploration of Multiliteracies - Tags: FAN fiction ANIMATED films -- Japan. Home » Adolescents' anime-inspired 'fanfictions': An exploration of Multiliteracies Adolescents' anime-inspired 'fanfictions': An exploration of Multiliteracies Chandler-Olcott, Kelly; Mahar, Donna April 2003 Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy;Apr2003, Vol. 46 Issue 7, p556 Academic Journal Article Examines the anime-inspired fanfiction of adolescents.

Tags: FAN fiction; ANIMATED films -- Japan; TEENAGERS; LITERACY Related Articles On the Cusp of Cyberspace: Adolescents' Online Text Use in Conversation. Share More Sharing ServicesMore Read the Article Courtesy of your local library Public Libraries Near You (See All) Looking for a Different Library? Enter a library name or part of a name, city, state, or province. Or enter your postal code and country to search by location: (optional) Other Topics Are You A Librarian? Are You A Publisher? About EBSCO © 2014 by EBSCO Publishing. Smart Pop Books — Book — Fic.

What is fanfiction, and what is it not? Why does fanfiction matter? And what makes it so important to the future of literature? Fic is a groundbreaking exploration of the history and culture of fan writing and what it means for the way we think about reading, writing, and authorship. It’s a story about literature, community, and technology—about what stories are being told, who’s telling them, how, and why.

With provocative discussions from both professional and fan writers, on subjects from Star Trek to The X-Files and Buffy the Vampire Slayer to Harry Potter, Twilight, and beyond, Fic sheds light on the widely misunderstood world(s) of fanfiction—not only how fanfiction is transforming the literary landscape, but how it already has. "Anne Jamison’s Fic is an indispensable guide to the dizzying world of fanfiction—its history, names, games, and creative promise. —Elaine Showalter, Professor Emerita of English and American Literature, Princeton University On Our Blog Posted December 3rd |

Organization for Transformative Works. Newlits - Fanfiction Unit for Grade 4 Classroom by Donna & Nicole. Online Fanfiction: What Technology and Popular Culture Can Teach Us About Writing and Literacy Instruction. Online Fanfiction: What Technology and Popular Culture Can Teach Us About Writing and Literacy Instruction by Rebecca W. Black Across the globe youth are growing up with digital and interactive media technologies as an integral part of their lives. This generation of learners, often called the 'Net-Generation, spends a great deal of free time engaging in online literacy-related activities such as instant messaging, gaming, surfing, and publishing on the web.

Such media and technology-literate students can pose special challenges for educators who grew up with and value more print-based forms of literacy. As a longtime fanfiction author, I was fascinated to find other fans publishing or posting their work on the web. In this article, I focus on a subsection of fanfiction.net that contains approximately 16,000 fictions based on Card Captor Sakura (CCS), an animé (Japanese animation) series popular with children and adolescents in a number of countries. Writing Curriculum and Fanfiction.

Writing with Jane. When the Lit Hits the Fan in Teacher Education. Using Fan Fiction to Teach Critical Reading and Writing Skills - Tags: FAN fiction READING comprehension. Home » Using Fan Fiction to Teach Critical Reading and Writing Skills Using Fan Fiction to Teach Critical Reading and Writing Skills Kell, Tracey October 2009 Teacher Librarian;Oct2009, Vol. 37 Issue 1, p32 Academic Journal Article The article discusses using the genre of fan fiction to teach critical reading and writing skills to students at the middle school level. Tags: FAN fiction; READING comprehension; COMPOSITION (Language arts) -- Study & teaching; WEBSITES; TEACHING methods; TEACHER-librarians Related Articles Ungraded Writing Assignments Help Students Engage with Content. // Curriculum Review;Nov2013, Vol. 53 Issue 3, p5 The article discusses "Writing to Learn," an approach to teaching writing assignments developed through collaboration between Teaching Channel and Educate Texas that utilizes warm-up exercises, active listening techniques, and reflective writing.Writing: Hard Work and Magic.

Share More Sharing ServicesMore Read the Article Courtesy of your local library Other Topics. I Love Your Book, but I Love My Version More: Fanfiction in the English Language Arts Classroom. Kerri L. Mathew and Devon Christopher Adams At midnight on August 2, 2008, the final installment of Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight Series, Breaking Dawn, hit bookstore shelves across the globe. But, regardless of whether Bella would chose Jacob Black or Edward Cullen as her final paramour, or whether she would become a vampire or remain mortal in Meyer’s grand finale, millions of children and teens had already finished the novel. For months they had been formulating extensions of Bella’s story—alternative narratives, new twists, and their own endings. Fan fiction is just what the name implies: it is fiction written by fans, often teenagers, of novels, movies, television, or other media. The Language of Literature A glance at the popular Internet site fanfiction.net hints at the popularity of the fan fiction phenomenon.

Authors of fan fiction, many of whom are young adult readers, take their work seriously and have adopted the language of literature to discuss and describe their own fiction. Access and afiiliation: The literacy and composition practices of English-language learners in an online fanfiction community.