Character/Plot

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The Index Card Method and Structure Grid All right, now you should have had enough time to watch at least one movie and note the sequences. Do you start to see how that works? By all means, keep watching movies to identify the sequence breakdown (and I will TRY to get to THE MATRIX this week) but at the same time, let's move on to This is the number one structuring tool of most screenwriters I know. The Index Card Method and Structure Grid
Plotting Made Easy - The Complications Worksheet Plotting Made Easy - The Complications Worksheet Want to create a book readers can't put down? A book you'll itch to write? A protagonist you'll love? An antagonist who will give you shivers? And (simultaneously) the first draft of a synopsis you can send to literary agents? Like many writers struggling with the question of how to create a good book, I've spun my mental wheels researching and experimenting with different methods of plotting: outlining versus free writing versus turning points versus notecards versus snowflake method etc.
Omniscient Person Point of View — The Writer’s Craft Basically, omniscient point of view means that the story is told from an all-seeing God-like, omnipotent viewpoint. You would use third person pronouns in the writing, but you can choose to dip into the head of any of the characters and reveal things that have occurred in the past or will happen in the future. This was once a very popular method of storytelling. It is less so now, especially in the North American market. Still there are some cases where this can add extra dimension to your writing when done well. Joseph Conrad was a master of omniscient viewpoint.

Omniscient Person Point of View — The Writer’s Craft

Point of View in Literature -- Perspectives — The Writer’s Craft

In order to fully understand point of view in literature, we need to explore the different perspectives from which a story may be told. Bear in mind that the Perspective is the scene as viewed through the eyes/mind of the chosen character. The story, however, can be told from any one of several points-of-view regardless of the perspective chosen. Single Major Character Viewpoint The story can be told from first, second or third person POV but it is told throughout by just one character. The reader discovers everything in the story at exactly the same time as the viewpoint character does. Point of View in Literature -- Perspectives — The Writer’s Craft
Third Person Point of View — The Writer’s Craft Enrollment Limited Sherry Wilson's step-by-step method helped me organize my thoughts and transform a simple idea into a full-fledged plot. Without her help and guidance, I'd still be walking around with just another "great idea for a story." Thanks to Sherry, though, I've published three novels and know there are more on the way! ~ Debi Faulkner, Summoning, LilyPad Princess and Murphy's Law "Sherry is extremely professional and knowledgeable in this field.

Third Person Point of View — The Writer’s Craft

Second Person Point of View — The Writer’s Craft

Second Person Point of View — The Writer’s Craft

Enrollment Limited Sherry Wilson's step-by-step method helped me organize my thoughts and transform a simple idea into a full-fledged plot. Without her help and guidance, I'd still be walking around with just another "great idea for a story." Thanks to Sherry, though, I've published three novels and know there are more on the way! ~ Debi Faulkner, Summoning, LilyPad Princess and Murphy's Law

First Person Point of View — The Writer’s Craft

When you tell a story through a viewpoint character using I or we, you are using first person point of view. Example: The banging on my door reverberated within my skull like a giant church bell in an empty hall. I groaned and rolled onto my stomach, pulling the pillow over my head. First Person Point of View — The Writer’s Craft
Book Manuscript Format – The Writer’s Craft Book Manuscript Format – The Writer’s Craft Book manuscript format is too frequently overlooked by many beginning writers. Of course, story is king. Nothing will help in your search for an editor or an agent if your story is weak.
Setting of a story — The Writer’s Craft

Setting of a story — The Writer’s Craft

The following exercises will allow you to create a rich, vibrant setting of a story, giving the reader the full vicarious experience. 1. Use the setting worksheet we have provided. Sit in a quiet place, close your eyes and imagine a particular setting for your scene. Using all of your senses visualize or experience everything that you see, hear, smell, taste, or touch.
Getting to Know your Characters Create a character or get to know him better with these creative writing exercises. Well written characters engage the reader and make him feel as though he has made a new friend. 1. Read! 2.

Creat a Character Exercises -- The Writer's Craft

Creat a Character Exercises -- The Writer's Craft

Fiction Writer's Character Chart - EpiGuide.com

If you're a fiction writer -- whether you're working on a novel, short story, screenplay, television series, play, web series, webserial, or blog-based fiction -- your characters should come alive for your reader or audience. The highly detailed chart below will help writers develop fictional characters who are believable, captivating, and unique. Print this page to complete the form for each main character you create. IMPORTANT: Note that all fields are optional and should be used simply as a guide; character charts should inspire you to think about your character in new ways, rather than constrain your writing. Fill in only as much info as you choose.
by Holly Lisle All Rights Reserved No matter what sort of fiction you’re writing, you’re going to have to populate your story with characters, and a lot of them, if not all of them, you’re going to have to create from scratch. Unfortunately — or maybe fortunately — there is no Betty Crocker Instant Character-In-A-Can that you can mix with water and pop into the oven for twenty minutes. There aren’t any quick and easy recipes, and I don’t have one either, but I do have some things that have worked for me when creating my characters, and some things that haven’t. You may find my experiences useful. For what they’re worth, here are my Do’s and Don’ts.

How to Create a Character | How To's

By Maisha Foster-O'Neal You've heard the old maxim before... 'a character can make or break your story.'

Creating an Original Character

Creating a character profile

When you get an idea for a short story or a novel you probably get the basic idea of the characters with it. But in order to build believable characters you need more than just a basic idea of them. You need to really them. The easiest way to flesh out a character is with a character profile, so get out a blank sheet of paper and follow the sample profile below. NAME: Put your characters full name - first, last, and any nicknames that he goes by. Make sure the name creates the right mental image of your character; a Bill causes a completely different image than a Byron.
Character Sketches for Character Development|cohdra Regardless of the type of writing you are doing, knowing who your characters are and knowing them well will add greatly to your work. Understanding your characters’ personalities through a character sketch helps you to understand where they are coming from and what motivates them. This, in turn, helps you understand what drives all of the action in your work, and the clearer this is, the easier your audiences will be able to connect with your writing.

How to Write a Character Sketch: Learning More About Your Characters’ Motivations and Personalities