background preloader

Ameliabrownn

Facebook Twitter

Amelia Brown

Hello There! I am Amelia Brown, Melbourne based 24-year-old girl. I am an MBA student and working part-time as business adviser.

'Western society has little space for ecstasy': back to Berlin's 90s club scene. When Gisèle Vienne was growing up in Grenoble, France, her artist mother used to say, “paintings are cheaper than wallpaper”.

'Western society has little space for ecstasy': back to Berlin's 90s club scene

So that’s exactly what they had, all over their walls. Vienne’s mum is Dorli Vienne-Pollak (a former student of Oskar Kokoschka), who made “pretty crazy, transgressive works” inspired by everything from 80s punks and strip clubs to fantasy battle scenes. It must have been quite an eyeful for a child. Today, Vienne’s Paris home is completely white. It’s a small rebellion against her upbringing, which, balanced with the influence of her “overeducated French intellectual” father, makes complete sense of the artist Vienne has become. Richard Thompson at 70: on love, loss and being a Muslim in Trump's US. Richard Thompson is drinking mint tea in a Hampstead coffee shop – he doesn’t touch coffee or alcohol – and between Islam and cricket, he’s discussing the remarkable guest list for his upcoming 70th birthday celebration at the Royal Albert Hall in London.

Richard Thompson at 70: on love, loss and being a Muslim in Trump's US

“I don’t like being the centre of attention, strange as it sounds,” he insists. “I just want to have a few friends over.” The man the LA Times once hailed as “the finest rock songwriter after Dylan” and “the best electric guitarist since Hendrix” will switch between electric and acoustic guitars, and hopes that “most guests will have time to do a couple of songs”. The 15 guests will include Pink Floyd hero David Gilmour, who has featured alongside Richard in a Rolling Stone magazine best ever guitarist list, and who, as a soloist, covered Richard’s 1975 song Dimming of the Day.

“He’ll do that,” says Richard. The cast will also include old and new British folk heroes, from Martin and Eliza Carthy to Olivia Chaney. I returned to uni for freshers’ week 20 years after leaving. Here’s what has changed. In the autumn of 1997, I was a fresher at the University of Glasgow.

I returned to uni for freshers’ week 20 years after leaving. Here’s what has changed

Months after the Labour landslide, weeks after the death of Diana, Princess of Wales, I was an 18-year-old British-Indian made up of equal parts teenage kicks, terror and Topshop – and on my way to Scotland for the first time, to live and study in a city I had never even visited. I was a 90s Londoner in every sense: geographically ignorant, cocky, earnestly carrying a pager. North, to me, meant north of the Thames. Yet there I was, on a train nosing true north on the west coast mainline. At Euston station, I was waved off by my parents. Twenty-two years later, I am on another train. I am off to meet some freshers and do the things that freshers in 2019 do. On campus, at first glance, freshers’ week is as it ever was. In room 243 – found despite the directions “between cloisters and south front” that I still find incomprehensible – I meet the four freshers I will be hanging out with. Beach towels and Brexit: how Germans really see the Brits. The strategy that Germany’s diplomatic corps proposed to keep Britain in the European community was unconventional and bold.

Beach towels and Brexit: how Germans really see the Brits

In November 1974, the then German chancellor Helmut Schmidt was desperately searching for the right words to convince British Eurosceptics to vote to remain a member of the European Economic Community. Schmidt had been offered a generous slot of 10 to 15 minutes at the Labour party conference, but a number of leftwing MPs had already announced they would walk out on his speech if he tried to “lecture” them. Katharina Focke, the German federal minister for youth, family and health, had some ingenious advice to offer after an informative meeting with her British counterpart Barbara Castle: “The only way to keep Britain in the European Community,” she wrote to Schmidt, “is not to remind it that it is already in.”

“The Germans love the Brits and everything that is British,” House of History’s president Hans Walter Hütter told the regional newspaper. CBD Melbourne: Short of a booming success - Melbourne Business Tips & Strategies. The Boomers’ historic win over the USA on Australian soil was a much-needed good news story for an event that has not met everyone’s expectations.

CBD Melbourne: Short of a booming success - Melbourne Business Tips & Strategies

Already, promoter TEG Live has offered some refunds to punters who coughed up hundreds or even thousands of dollars for a series that spruiked a line-up including LeBron James, Kevin Durant and Ben Simmons and didn’t deliver any of them. The competition watchdog is also investigating the event. But basketball insiders knew it was a joke months ago. After all, James last year signed a four-year contract with the Los Angeles Lakers for $154 million. Why would he risk injury with an international exhibition match?

It’s worth noting the event also got a handout from the state government, with former sports and major events minister John Eren teaming up with Visit Victoria chief executive Peter Bingeman (a basketball tragic) back in 2018 to seal the deal. Read more: