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Breast refusal

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Nipple Confusion. There are some basic mechanical differences between how a baby gets milk from a bottle and how a baby gets milk out of the breast.

Nipple Confusion

Giving bottles or pacifiers to young, breastfeeding babies often leads to nipple confusion. Baby tries to use the bottle-feeding technique on the breast and has difficulty latching-on and sucking. Baby gets very frustrated, and so does mother. Nipple confusion can even lead to baby refusing the breast. Here’s an explanation. To get milk from the breast, baby must coordinate tongue and jaw movements in a sucking motion that’s unique to breastfeeding. Babies suck from a bottle entirely differently. Problems occur when babies apply the lessons learned from bottle-feeding to nursing at the breast. Babies who get bottles soon after birth may thrust their tongue upward during sucking and push the breast nipple out of their mouth.They don’t open their mouths wide enough when latching-on, so they suck only the tip of the nipple.

Banish bottles and pacifiers. Baby won't latch. When Baby Does Not Yet Latch. Why Would A Baby Not Latch?

When Baby Does Not Yet Latch

There are many reasons a baby might refuse to take the breast. Often there is a combination of reasons. For example, a baby might latch on even with a tight frenulum if no other factors come into play, but if, for example, he is also given bottles early on, or if the mother’s nipples and areolas are swollen from fluid from the fluids she received during the labour and birth, this may very well change the situation from “good enough”, to “not working at all”. Some babies are unwilling to nurse, or suck poorly as a result of medication they received during the labour. Narcotics are responsible for many such situations, and meperidine (Demerol) is particularly bad as it stays in the baby’s blood for a long time and affects the way he sucks for several days.

There is no evidence that a healthy full term newborn must feed every three hours (or two hours, or whatever) during the first few days. When Baby Does Not Yet Latch. There are many reasons a baby might refuse to take the breast.

When Baby Does Not Yet Latch

Often there is a combination of reasons. For example, a baby might latch on even with a tight frenulum if no other factors come into play, but if, for example, he is also given bottles early on, or if the mother’s nipples and areolas are swollen from fluid from the fluids she received during the labour and birth, this may very well change the situation from “good enough”, to “not working at all”. Some babies are unwilling to nurse, or suck poorly as a result of medication they received during the labour. Narcotics are responsible for many such situations, and meperidine (Demerol) is particularly bad as it stays in the baby’s blood for a long time and affects the way he sucks for several days. Even morphine given in an epidural (Epimorph) may cause the baby to be unwilling to nurse or latch on, since medication from an epidural definitely does get into the mother’s blood, and thus into the baby before he is born.

Questions? Getting baby to latch. Nursing Strike Help for the Breastfeeding Mom. When baldy doesn’t want your tit: newborn breast refusal - Emma Pickett breastfeeding support. Help — My Baby Won’t Nurse! By Kelly Bonyata, BS, IBCLC Introduction The following techniques have proven helpful for a wide range of problems with baby refusing the breast.

Help — My Baby Won’t Nurse!

Some of the babies who might benefit include: a newborn (or older adopted baby) trying to figure out how to breastfeeda previously-weaned baby whom you wish to breastfeed againa baby who seriously resists nursing (or even being placed in a nursing position)a baby with nipple confusiona baby who is a fussy nurser (but does not completely refuse the breast)a baby on a nursing strike Even if you have a baby who adamantly resists nursing, getting your baby to breast is very possible but it will probably require time, patience, and kangaroo-style frequency. If you’re getting discouraged working with your non-nursing baby, read this: My Baby Just Doesn’t Get It. When a Baby Won't Nurse. Carol Brussel, BA, IBCLC Denver CO USA From: NEW BEGINNINGS, Vol. 18 No. 4, July - August 2001, p. 136-138 A mother seeks help with her infant, who, she says, "has never breastfed.

When a Baby Won't Nurse

" She is pumping her milk for her baby, and longs to be able to feed her baby at the breast instead. When the mother lifts her shirt and exposes her breast and brings her baby close to her, the baby begins crying loudly and pushes at the mother's breast, frantic, until the mother moves the baby away and covers her breast.

Tears stream down her face as the baby, offered the bottle, begins sucking contentedly. "He hates me," she declares.