background preloader

On Game-Based Learning

Facebook Twitter

Games. Games can be powerful teaching tools.


It's long been understood that young children learn a lot through play, whether it's with blocks, picture books or even hide and seek. The learning doesn't stop as we get older. Teens and even adults can learn while playing games, and there is a wide range of games available to teach a variety of topics, including financial literacy. Background For centuries, play was considered a diversion rather than a means for education. Research Much research has been done on whether online games and other interactive educational tools can teach people how to make better decisions regarding personal finances, including an exciting new study called " Improving American's Financial Literacy: Educational Tools at Work ," by Lisa A.

Practical Money Skills Games There are several educational games that teach personal finance and money management skills to students of every age on the Practical Money Skills website, including: The Email Game for Chrome Awards Points for Quick Replies and Small Inboxes.

Interesting approach to teaching emails in English with a problem-solving, game-base focus. – alexiglesias

ENGAGE Learning. ZAPdramatic. My 5 Favorite Online Language Games. Posted by ddeubel on Tuesday, March 29th 2011 Now and then, I post on my twitter @ddeubel , some “tired teacher tips”.

My 5 Favorite Online Language Games

Things that a teacher can just put up on a screen with a click and get students learning/producing English. I’ll post another time about these (the hashtag is #tttips) but I want to share something similar. My 5 top online games for students. These can also be used by “tired” teachers however the point or hope is that students will find these so engaging that they’ll want to keep playing at home. So here it goes ….. #1 Draw My Thing. . #2 Guess The Google. . #3 Name The Languages. . #4 The Tipping Point. . #5 The Subservient Chicken. Honorable mentions: Akinator / Alice the chatterbot , Deal or No Deal I’ve made it a kind of obsessive quest to catalog games on EFL Classroom.

GAMES FOR LANGUAGE LEARNING. Assessment in Game-Based Learning « Game-Based Learning Talk. Assessment in game-based learning (GBL) programs can be far superior to your typical weekly multiple-choice test.

Assessment in Game-Based Learning « Game-Based Learning Talk

Games are all about constant assessment. Games do not actively “teach” – they don’t say “here is some knowledge for you to remember” – but rather they provide constant challenges and then give you feedback on your decisions, and that is how you learn. So, in order to better understand how to design effective GBL programs, let’s take a look at some characteristics and considerations of assessment in GBL. More formative feedback “The most valuable assessment for instruction is the continuous, deeply engaged feedback loop of formative assessment” – quote from EdWeek article. Games can provide a greater amount and better quality of formative feedback than a traditional classroom. Better assessment than traditional methods How is feedback in the game mapped to the learning objectives? And, please feel free to assess this article in the comments!

Like this: Like Loading... ESL games in adult classes - Articles. Larry Ferlazzo, Teacher. Why Use Games for Teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language? Teaching Tools: Using Online Simulations and Games. Students who are passionate gamers can talk a blue streak about the virtual online worlds where they invest their free time and energy.

Teaching Tools: Using Online Simulations and Games

Usually, of course, they get to play only when they're not at school. But why not bring gaming into the classroom? Could teachers tap that same passion to spark learning? Gaming remains new territory for most schools. As the following examples show, educators on the frontiers are eager to share what they're learning. Evoke Social Change This spring, several teachers introduced their high school students to an alternate reality game that challenges players to solve big global challenges. Here's how it works: Each week, a new chapter from a graphic novel introduces players to a different challenge from the not-so-distant future.

Paul Allison, an English teacher at East-West School of International Studies in New York, has been playing Evoke right alongside his students. As Allison explains in this recent blog post: WoW and Tech Standards?