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CrowdMed. Health Apps Library. Children are suffering from rise of the 'Gameboy Back' Is there any point giving things up for January? 5 January 2014Last updated at 20:13 ET By Tom de Castella BBC News Magazine The festive season is over.

Is there any point giving things up for January?

The time for guilt is nigh. But is foreswearing alcohol, junk food or caffeine for just one month really any good for your health? Newspaper articles saying that we typically eat 7,000 calories on Christmas Day are fresh in the mind. Evidence of sustained merry-making is perhaps hanging off our waists. 10 Amazing Ways To Stop Overeating. What if your gluten intolerance is all in your head? Read full article Continue reading page |1|2|3 For many sufferers, gluten intolerance may originate in the mind, not the body.

What if your gluten intolerance is all in your head?

But that's nothing to be ashamed of, says a philosopher While living in China from 2003 to 2005, I often served as the designated translator for fellow expatriates. Making babies happy, healthy - and green. 21 March 2013Last updated at 08:26 ET By Helen Lennard BBC Audio and Music Dr Alice Roberts will have one of the 820,000 babies born in the UK this year This year 820,000 babies are expected to be born in the UK - part of a baby boom that has been quietly but unexpectedly taking place in the UK for the past 10 years.

Making babies happy, healthy - and green

Can singing a lullaby ease a child's pain? 29 October 2013Last updated at 05:57 ET By James Gallagher Health and science reporter, BBC News Nick Pickett playing to Sam Wallace Amid the beeping of heart monitors, a more gentle noise can be heard on the wards of Great Ormond Street Hospital.

Can singing a lullaby ease a child's pain?

The soft voice of musician Nick Pickett and the strumming of his guitar are entertaining the young patients in Bear Ward. All the children here are under three years old. Some are facing the long wait for a heart transplant and are being kept alive by the rhythmic beating of a mechanical heart. Older dads linked to rise in mental illness. 22 August 2012Last updated at 13:11 ET By Pallab Ghosh Science correspondent, BBC News Most mutations are linked to the father's age rather than the mother's, experts believe A genetic study has added to evidence that the increase in some mental and other disorders may be due to men having children later in life.

Older dads linked to rise in mental illness

Antibiotics can make young children heavier, says study. 22 August 2012Last updated at 09:47 ET Does exposure to antibiotics affect healthy bacteria?

Antibiotics can make young children heavier, says study

Giving antibiotics to young babies may increase their weight later in life, according to US researchers. A study of 11,532 infants, published in the International Journal of Obesity, showed children under six months who were given antibiotics were heavier in later years. The science of a long life. 30 January 2013Last updated at 19:54 ET Bombarded with adverts promising a longer, healthier life, BBC News Los Angeles correspondent Peter Bowes goes in search of eternal youth.

The science of a long life

If we are lucky, we will grow old. Most of us have grey hair, wrinkles, frailty, loss of memory and degenerative diseases to look forward to - if we do not have them already. It is not all bad news. With ageing, we can acquire wisdom and often become more emotionally stable and at ease with life. How to live beyond 100. 2 July 2012Last updated at 05:51 ET By Lucy Wallis BBC News There are nearly 12,000 centenarians in Britain today, but with more people reaching 100 how do scientific theories about life expectancy compare with the experience of those who have received a telegram from the Queen?

How to live beyond 100

At the age of 102 Nora Hardwick posed naked as Miss November for a charity calendar. "They couldn't get enough ladies for the 12 months… It was very tastefully done. I had a pink tulle scarf to hide the bits and pieces. " Why I consumed my own blood. Human blood is an extraordinary substance that manages simultaneously to nourish, sustain protect and regenerate our bodies, but despite decades of research we are only just beginning to exploit its full potential.

Why I consumed my own blood

Michael Mosley has been putting his own blood through a series of rigorous tests. In 1897 Bram Stoker's Dracula was published, helping fan an interest in blood-drinking human vampires that has never gone away. In the novel, Count Dracula feeds on human blood and transforms himself from a little old man with white hair into a dark-haired super-athlete. Stoker's novel, and others that came before it (such as "Carmilla", a novel about a lesbian vampire) were in turn inspired by centuries of mythology that have surrounded blood, mainly focused on its alleged powers to heal and restore.

In later centuries, medical practice focused more often on blood letting than blood consumption, but the belief in the power of blood to restore and rejuvenate persisted. Birthweight link to lifelong health. 22 August 2011Last updated at 00:05.

Birthweight link to lifelong health

Children with older fathers and grandfathers 'live longer' 11 June 2012Last updated at 22:24 ET By Michelle Roberts Health editor, BBC News website Delaying fatherhood may offer survival advantages, say US scientists who have found children with older fathers and grandfathers appear to be "genetically programmed" to live longer. The genetic make-up of sperm changes as a man ages and develops DNA code that favours a longer life - a trait he then passes to his children.

The team found the link after analysing the DNA of 1,779 young adults. The health hazards of sitting. Organ damage Heart disease Muscles burn less fat and blood flows more sluggishly during a long sit, allowing fatty acids to more easily clog the heart. Prolonged sitting has been linked to high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol, and people with the most sedentary time are more than twice as likely to have cardiovascular disease than those with the least.

Overproductive pancreas The pancreas produces insulin, a hormone that carries glucose to cells for energy. Inactivity.png. Massive rise in Asian eye damage. 3 May 2012Last updated at 22:23 ET By Matt McGrath Science reporter, BBC World Service Lijia Zhang, a writer and social commentator in Beijing, told the BBC that high expectations on children were a factor Up to 90% of school leavers in major Asian cities are suffering from myopia - short-sightedness - a study suggests. Researchers say the "extraordinary rise" in the problem is being caused by students working very hard in school and missing out on outdoor light.

The scientists told the Lancet that up to one in five of these students could experience severe visual impairment and even blindness. In the UK, the average level of myopia is between 20% and 30%. According to Professor Ian Morgan, who led this study and is from the Australian National University, 20-30% was once the average among people in South East Asia as well. Continue reading the main story. Being bilingual 'boosts brain power' 1 May 2012Last updated at 02:49 ET Differences were seen in the brainstem (coloured orange in this picture) Learning a second language can boost brain power, scientists believe. The US researchers from Northwestern University say bilingualism is a form of brain training - a mental "work out" that fine-tunes the mind. Can science explain why I'm a pessimist? 9 July 2013Last updated at 21:02 ET.

Air-conditioning: Why might women feel temperature differently to men? There's been a great deal of coverage of a study this week that suggested that women feel temperature differently in workplaces than men. Is there an explanation for why men and women might feel comfortable at different room temperatures, asks Chris Stokel-Walker.

Disease

Skincare. Fitness. Why drugs often list headache as a side-effect. Do you really need to drink eight cups of water a day? 10 October 2013Last updated at 04:25 ET. Diet. Smoking, Alcohol, Drugs. Vitamins. Grapefruit and pills mix warning. 26 November 2012Last updated at 12:21 ET By James Gallagher Health and science reporter, BBC News.

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Body clock 'alters' immune system. 17 February 2012Last updated at 01:43 By James Gallagher Health and science reporter, BBC News. Can meditation help prevent the effects of ageing? Can meditation really slow down the effects of age? Meditation boosts genes that promote good health - health - 02 May 2013. Feeling run-down? Try a little chanting, or meditation – seriously. Such relaxation techniques can boost the activity of genes involved in several processes beneficial to health, and they only take a few minutes each day to show results.

Previous studies have reported changes to the brain while people practise these activities, but a new study shows for the first time that gene activity changes too. This could explain the reported beneficial effects of meditation, yoga and prayer. Coffee addiction: Do people consume too much caffeine? 22 May 2013 Last updated at 20:58 ET By Jon Kelly BBC News Magazine, Washington DC US officials are investigating the safety of caffeine in snacks and energy drinks, worried about the "cumulative impact" of the stimulant - which is added to a growing number of products. Is our tea and coffee-fuelled society too dependent on the world's favourite drug? The bubbling kettle, the aroma from the mug, the first bitter mouthful of the morning. It's a ritual without which the working day would be, for millions of people, frankly horrifying.

Caffeine is, according to New Scientist , the planet's most popular "psychoactive drug. " But now even the US - home of Coca-Cola, Starbucks and the 5-Hour Energy shot - is questioning the wisdom of adding it to everyday foodstuffs like waffles, sunflower seeds, trail mix and jelly beans. Continue reading the main story. How to optimize your caffeine intake. Two doctors at Penn State University have developed Caffeine Zone, a free iOS app that tells you the perfect time to take a coffee break to maintain an optimal amount of caffeine in your blood — and, perhaps more importantly, it also tells you when to stop drinking tea and coffee, so that caffeine doesn’t interrupt your sleep.

Coffee v smoothies: Which is better for you? This Is Your Brain on Coffee. Illustration by Ben Wiseman This column appears in the June 9 issue of The New York Times Magazine. Caffeine energy drinks 'intensify heart contractions' BBC Food - How healthy is your coffee?