background preloader

Online vs highstreet

Facebook Twitter

Birmingham City University - Sign In. 10 Notable Omnichannel Trends and Statistics [Infographic] How important is omnichannel customer engagement strategy?

10 Notable Omnichannel Trends and Statistics [Infographic]

Omnichannel shopping experience is the latest buzzword in retail, and rightly so because it streamlines both online and in-store customer experience. Basically, omni-channel is simply a multi-channel sales approach that provides the customers with a unified shopping experience. Opening Destinations BWP Group. Store of the future – Creating the ultimate digital experience. As the latest fashion stores are increasingly being set up as showrooms and shopping temples, brand article manufacturers are finding new ways to connect with their clientele via all their senses.

Store of the future – Creating the ultimate digital experience

The ultimate shopping experience is taking on a new dimension – enabled by technology. By extending the experience to the digital world, fashion retailers are engaging their customers in new ways to connect them with the brand and the store. Brands that realise the importance of the digital experience early on are set to become the trendsetters for the entire retail industry. Changing Retail: Increase Customer Engagement with Interactive Digital Technology.

Retail is changing.

Changing Retail: Increase Customer Engagement with Interactive Digital Technology

In fact, the same can be said for many companies with brick-and-mortar locations in almost all verticals as they are feeling the squeeze from the increasing number of consumers going online to shop. These traditional companies are watching their profits erode. These companies know their future is bleak if they do not follow the advice of one of today’s leading marketers, Seth Godin, in his book “Survival is Not Enough”. Local Retail Playbook. Nottingham Trent University researchers say phone users pick them up 85 times a DAY. Many of us reach for our phones the second we wake up, and they're often the last thing we look at before we go to bed, but we may not realise just how much they rule our lives.

Nottingham Trent University researchers say phone users pick them up 85 times a DAY

A study has discovered that the average person checks their device 85 times a day, spending a total of five hours browsing the web and using apps. This equates to around a third of the time a person is awake, and is twice as often as many people even realise. Shopping Then and Now: Five Ways Retail Has Changed and How Businesses Can Adapt. Constant connectivity, contextual relevance, and a multi-screen world are changing both online and offline shopping.

Shopping Then and Now: Five Ways Retail Has Changed and How Businesses Can Adapt

As the digital and in-store experiences blur, it is opening up exciting new possibilities for forward-thinking retailers. Sridhar Ramaswamy, who as Google's SVP of Ads and Commerce oversees the technology behind Google Shopping, explains how combining classic retail truths with digital savvy can help retailers do what matters most: serve their customers better. Written by Sridhar Ramaswamy Published. Retail, Recession and Recovery: A Look at the Impact of the Recession on the Retail Industry and the Steps Towards Recovery.

Retail, Recession and Recovery: A Look at the Impact of the Recession on the Retail Industry and the Steps Towards Recovery The recession has dominated the headlines for years now - hitting the UK hard in the home and on the high street.

Retail, Recession and Recovery: A Look at the Impact of the Recession on the Retail Industry and the Steps Towards Recovery

As we tightened our belts, more and more shops and retail units closed down and were boarded up. Today, the country seems to have avoided a triple-dip recession, and recently, encouraging signs have even begun to show. High street hit hard. Mary Portas: how I would have saved BHS. British Home Stores had a place in the heart of the 1970s shopper.

Mary Portas: how I would have saved BHS

It was a practical solution brand that was affordable and accessible. At its heart, it delivered good quality, decent stuff for people on a budget. Fashion: Facts and Figures. London Fashion Week & British Fashion Industry Facts & Figures. The 62nd edition of London Fashion Week will take place in its new home: Brewer Street Car Park in the heart of Soho.

London Fashion Week & British Fashion Industry Facts & Figures

The schedule features 78 designers who will showcase SS16 collections to UK and international press and buyers across five days. Today, market research firm Mintel has released the following statistics: • £27billion (£27,051billion) worth of womenswear sales predicted for 2015, a 4% rise from £26billion (£25,950billion) in 2014 (Mintel, 2015) • £10.3billion worth of sales of men’s and women’s footwear in 2015, up 6.5% from £9.4billion since 2015 (Mintel, 2015) • £32 billion (£31,842 million) worth of womenswear sales forecasted by 2019, a growth of 23% (Mintel, 2015) • 67% of women have purchased clothes online in 2015, up from 65% in 2014.

Global fashion industry statistics - International apparel. Total trade of clothing and textiles: 726 billion dollars The most traded apparel and textile products are non-knit women’s suits, knit sweaters, knit T-shirts and non-knit men’s suits.

Global fashion industry statistics - International apparel

Non-knit women’s suits: 54.6 billion dollars, 7.5 percent Knit sweaters: 52.8 billion dollars, 7.3 percent Non-knit men’s suits: 43.4 billion dollars, 6 percent Knit T-shirts: 36.9 billion dollars, 5.1 percent Knit Women’s suits: Knit women’s suits: 28.2 billion dollars, 3.9 percent Light rubberized knitted fabric: 23.9 billion dollars, 3.3 percent Synthetic filament yarn woven fabric: 20.9 billion dollars, 2.9 percent Raw cotton: 18.9 billion dollars, 2.6 percent Non-retail synthetic yarn: 18.8 billion dollars, 2.6 percent. The History of Online Shopping in Nutshell. The Electronic commerce or e-Commerce as is known today evolved as businesses (end to end process) started to shift from real time market to digital market.

The History of Online Shopping in Nutshell

All of the business today as we see is done over the internet and anything which is not there is meant to be wiped off. Ecommerce, the online shopping system has brought down political and physical barriers giving everyone in the world an equal playing ground for their market, everyone can put their products on sale through the e-stores(website dedicated to selling of product, a virtual store). Speaking about the last decade we saw a great market, rise over the internet, online shopping was introduced wherein firstly computer scientists got interested in then it came to general public and gradually became a substitute for the real market place.

Death of the high street? Hurrah… During a slump, businesses in most parts of the economy get knocked sideways. It is during the recovery that you see which sectors are going to thrive in the long run, and which are going to wither. The data currently trickling in suggest that manufacturing, construction and financial and business services are doing pretty well. But there is one bit of the economy that shows little sign of life: that is the high street. The problem is not that people have given up buying stuff. Has the "death of the high street" been exaggerated? New studies published today have found that UK consumers still opt for physical shopping destinations and suggest “the death of the high street” has been exaggerated. A report by The Markey Creative has found that 75 per cent of consumers surveyed would not abandon the high street for online shopping.

Nearly half of consumers preferred to get a feel for the products they were purchasing and nearly a quarter said they enjoyed the social aspect of shopping. John Lewis and Next Christmas store sales PLUNGE as shoppers flock to the internet. Britain's largest retailers have revealed falling sale stores when compared to Christmas 2014. John Lewis said today in-store sales fell by 1.2 per cent in the crucial six weeks to January, compared to the same period last year. But at the same time, online trade jumped by 21.4 per cent and represented 40 per cent of all sales. Making shops fun places with tech to help you buy. At the start of May, online shopping platform notonthehighstreet.com celebrated its tenth anniversary by going against the habit of its lifetime and selling products offline.

It held a three-day pop-up physical shopping experience in London’s Spitalfields Market, allowing customers to step through eight interactive “doorways” into the various shopping categories it uses in its online store. The small businesses that sell on the platform were able to meet and greet shoppers like never before, and the platform offered master classes in the likes of tea mixology and calligraphy. The move is part of a growing trend of internet-native businesses creating physical stores. Online furniture retailer Made.com went from clicks to bricks by opening a showroom in central London in 2014 and even Amazon, the world’s biggest online retailer, opened a physical bookstore in Seattle last November. Engaging and exciting. Social media listening means big business for retailers. Modern retailers thrive on online reviews, social media commentary and customer feedback, using insights gleaned from these sources to change the way they do business.

From e-commerce giants to local bookstores, retailers are using the data they get from shoppers to create a feedback loop of personalised recommendations and promotions, and to improve the service, merchandise and prices they offer. But some believe digital communications are an impersonal and remote way for retailers to create meaningful relationships with customers, preferring a human interaction. Waterstones managing director James Daunt, who has moved the bankrupt bookshop chain into profit since taking over five years ago, says: “Unlike our domestic and international peers, our shops are resolutely old fashioned. Social media listening. H&M Group. Boutique de vêtements en ligne.

The online and in-store relationship. Online shopping is king - high street stores must adapt or die. Analysis: How many stores is too many? Get fit for fashion's digital future. Glossy: Fashion, Luxury, Technology. Glossy: Fashion, Luxury, Technology. Glossy: Fashion, Luxury, Technology. To survive on the High Street, shops must prioritise experience and ethics.