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Executing Dynamic Code in .Net. By Rick Strahl Last Update: September 8th, 2002 Code for this article: Dynamic code execution is a powerful feature that allows applications to be extended with code that is not compiled into the application.

Executing Dynamic Code in .Net

Users can customize applications and developers can dynamically update code easily. In this article, Rick takes a look what it takes to execute code dynamically with the .Net framework and introduces a class that simplifies the tasks by wrapping the details of the process in an easy to use interface that only requires a few lines of code. I come from an xBase background using Visual FoxPro for many years.

One of the nice features of xBase has always been the ability to dynamically execute code in applications. In the past, developers have often snubbed me and xBase in general for this capability to use 'macros' (as they would say with disdain), partially because in the early days of xBase macros where used for a number of kludges required to make the language work correctly. Compiling and Executing Code at Runtime. Download source code - 18.3 Kb Well, this is my first article at The Code Project, so I'll try my best to stay on topic.

Compiling and Executing Code at Runtime

I was recently interested in creating a sort of precedence calculator library. I was about 10% underway when I suddenly had a thought. What if instead I could just use C# code, compile and execute it, then get the result of the mathematical equation back. Well, I figured it wouldn't be easy, but there must be a way of making it work.

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Embedded Code In Reporting Services. When I first installed Reporting Services I had read something about embedded code, and my head had filled with visions of grandeur.

Embedded Code In Reporting Services

I pictured hooking events for customization and deriving new classes to override virtual functions. I expected an ASP.NET experience complete with code behind and a reporting engine under the hood. So before we continue, let’s be clear – you won’t be doing any of the above with embedded code in Reporting Services for SQL Server 2000. There are, however, lots of extensibility points in Reporting Services. You can write rendering, delivery, security, and data processing extensions to meet special needs, such as forms authentication – but the focus of this article will be on embedded code. Using the SQL Reporting Services Web Service - Microsoft: ASP.NET FAQ. Join your peers on the Internet's largest technical computer professional community.It's easy to join and it's free.

Using the SQL Reporting Services Web Service - Microsoft: ASP.NET FAQ

Here's Why Members Love Tek-Tips Forums: Talk To Other MembersNotification Of Responses To QuestionsFavorite Forums One Click AccessKeyword Search Of All Posts, And More... Register now while it's still free! Reporting Services Web Service. Sign in Home 2014 2012 2008 R2 2008 Previous Versions Library Forums Reporting Services Web Service SQL Server 2000.

Reporting Services Web Service

Using custom .NET code with Reporting Services part I - Mike's Blog. Tutorial: Generating RDL Using the .NET Framework. This tutorial illustrates how to write Report Definition Language (RDL) to a report definition file using the System.Xml.XmlDocument class.

Tutorial: Generating RDL Using the .NET Framework

,The XmlDocument class provides an XML document object model (DOM) you can use to quickly generate the data structure of an RDL, and helps you to build report definition documents that conform to the RDL specification. If you need to write XML as raw data without the overhead of a DOM, you can use an System.Xml.XmlTextWriter. The writer provides a fast, forward-only way of generating XML. The System.Xml.XmlTextWriter writes to a stream rather than using an object model such as the XML DOM. During the course of this tutorial, you will complete the following activities: To complete the tutorial, you must have the following: Estimated time to complete the tutorial: 60 minutes.

Walkthrough - Generating RDL Using the .NET Framework. This walkthrough illustrates how to write Report Definition Language (RDL) to a report definition file using the XmlTextWriter class.

Walkthrough - Generating RDL Using the .NET Framework

The writer provides a fast, forward-only way of generating XML, thus RDL, and helps you to build report definition documents that conform to the RDL specification. The XmlTextWriter writes to a stream rather than using an object model such as the XML DOM, and so gives better performance.

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CSS. Art Source. AutoStitch. AutoStitch works from unordered collections of images, automatically finding matches between images using the SIFT algorithm.

AutoStitch

It then robustly aligns all images and uses advanced blending algorithms to form seamless panoramas (see below). For more details, see our research papers. 25 of 57 images aligned All 57 images aligned Final Result Note: Mobile versions of AutoStitch are developed by Cloudburst Research. AutoStitch is available to license from the University of British Columbia. AutoStitch is now available in the following commercial products: Black Viper’s Windows XP x86 (32-bit) Service Pack 3 Service Configurations. Font Generator. Em Calculator. Raspberry Pi XBMC Media Center – A Complete Solution. I have to admit it’s taken a good amount of research and experimentation, but I finally have an XBMC media center solution on the Raspberry Pi that rivals what I used to have on my old power-sucking full-size PC.

I’m writing this guide to help others get up and running with a stable solution as quickly as possible. I’ll be covering everything from the hardware pieces to the software and configuration. I’m also hoping this guide will be accessible to those who aren’t overly tech-inclined, and I’ll provide some support in the comments. Continue on after the break for the complete guide. Table of Contents Introduction What is a Raspberry Pi? The Raspberry Pi is a credit card-sized computer that you can buy for $35. The Pi has two USB ports, an 1/8″ audio port (headphone jack), an RCA video out (for standard definition TVs), an HDMI video out (for HDTVs), an SD card slot, and an ethernet port. What is XBMC? Why create a Raspberry Pi XBMC media center? Back to Index The Hardware “Whew! Raspberry Pi.