background preloader

US politics

Facebook Twitter

Opinion | I Am Part of the Resistance Inside the Trump Administration. The Times is taking the rare step of publishing an anonymous Op-Ed essay. We have done so at the request of the author, a senior official in the Trump administration whose identity is known to us and whose job would be jeopardized by its disclosure. We believe publishing this essay anonymously is the only way to deliver an important perspective to our readers. We invite you to submit a question about the essay or our vetting process here. [Update: Our answers to some of those questions are published here.] President Trump is facing a test to his presidency unlike any faced by a modern American leader. It’s not just that the special counsel looms large. Or that the country is bitterly divided over Mr. [The author of this Op-Ed will publish a book in November 2019 titled “A Warning.”] The dilemma — which he does not fully grasp — is that many of the senior officials in his own administration are working diligently from within to frustrate parts of his agenda and his worst inclinations.

“I Hate Everyone in the White House!”: Trump Seethes as Advisers Fear the President Is “Unraveling” At first it sounded like hyperbole, the escalation of a Twitter war. But now it’s clear that Bob Corker’s remarkable New York Times interview—in which the Republican senator described the White House as “adult day care” and warned Trump could start World War III—was an inflection point in the Trump presidency. It brought into the open what several people close to the president have recently told me in private: that Trump is “unstable,” “losing a step,” and “unraveling.”

The conversation among some of the president’s longtime confidantes, along with the character of some of the leaks emerging from the White House has shifted. There’s a new level of concern. NBC News published a report that Trump shocked his national security team when he called for a nearly tenfold increase in the country’s nuclear arsenal during a briefing this summer.

One Trump adviser confirmed to me it was after this meeting disbanded that Secretary of State Rex Tillerson called Trump a “moron.” Trump Dropped His Demand To Fund The Wall — That’s Smart Politics. “Something there is that doesn’t love a wall.” If Robert Frost had been writing about President Trump’s proposed southern border wall, that “something” would have been the American people — turns out not many of them actually like the idea of building it. In late March, Quinnipiac found that 64 percent of Americans thought “beginning to fund the wall along the border with Mexico” was a “bad idea.” On Tuesday, Trump decided to withdraw his demand that funding for the wall be included in a short-term government funding bill due to pass Congress this week. (If it doesn’t pass by midnight Friday, the government will shut down). While the president’s backing down could be read as a loss of face, it could also more charitably be interpreted as good politics.

The wall was a useful metaphor — just like Frost’s wall (read the whole poem) — that helped Trump get elected; it was brash shorthand that communicated his restrictive immigration policies to voters. Donald Rodham Clinton. Observers have been waiting for more than a year for Donald Trump to stop acting like a beer hall bouncer and start acting more presidential. On Wednesday, that wish came true, as Baby Donald completed his transformation into a standard chief executive of the United States by espousing many of the hallmark policies one would have associated with President Hillary Clinton. My Politico Playbook colleagues discerned Trump’s recent policy shift in their Thursday tipsheet. Previously, Trump said NATO was obsolete.

Now, he salutes it, Clinton-style, as a “great alliance.” Previously, he lavished kisses on Vladimir Putin and Russia. Now Trump and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson have taken a Clintonesque stand against Russia, admitting to low levels of trust between the two nations. Then: No war in Syria. Story Continued Below Remember how Trump’s surrogates said during the campaign that a Clinton presidency would be too hobbled by the ongoing FBI investigation to govern effectively?

FBI refused White House request to knock down recent Trump-Russia stories. But a White House official said late Thursday that the request was only made after the FBI indicated to the White House it did not believe the reporting to be accurate. White House officials had sought the help of the bureau and other agencies investigating the Russia matter to say that the reports were wrong and that there had been no contacts, the officials said. The reports of the contacts were first published by The New York Times and CNN on February 14. The direct communications between the White House and the FBI were unusual because of decade-old restrictions on such contacts. Such a request from the White House is a violation of procedures that limit communications with the FBI on pending investigations. Late Thursday night, White House press secretary Sean Spicer objected to CNN's characterization of the White House request to the FBI. "We didn't try to knock the story down.

The White House did issue its own denial, with Priebus calling The New York Times story "complete garbage. " How Donald Trump Could Build an Autocracy in the U.S. - The Atlantic. 点击这里阅读中文版本 It’s 2021, and President Donald Trump will shortly be sworn in for his second term. The 45th president has visibly aged over the past four years. He rests heavily on his daughter Ivanka’s arm during his infrequent public appearances. Fortunately for him, he did not need to campaign hard for reelection. Listen to the audio version of this article: Download the Audm app for your iPhone to listen to more titles. The president’s critics, meanwhile, have found little hearing for their protests and complaints. Allegations of fraud and self-dealing in the TrumpWorks program, and elsewhere, have likewise been shrugged off. Most Americans intuit that their president and his relatives have become vastly wealthier over the past four years.

Anyway, doesn’t everybody do it? The business community learned its lesson early. The media have grown noticeably more friendly to Trump as well. Meanwhile, social media circulate ever-wilder rumors. “Ambition must be made to counteract ambition.” Trump Aides Can’t Stop Blabbing About How He’s a Madman. The Frankfurt School Knew Trump Was Coming. Shortly after the Presidential election, a small piece of good news came over the wire: the Thomas Mann villa in Los Angeles has been saved. The house, which was built to Mann’s specifications, in the nineteen-forties, went on the market earlier this year, and it seemed likely to be demolished, because the structure was deemed less valuable than the land beneath it.

After prolonged negotiations, the German government bought the property, with the idea of establishing it as a cultural center. The house deserves to stand not only because a great writer lived there but because it brings to mind a tragic moment in American cultural history. The author of “Death in Venice” and “The Magic Mountain” settled in this country in 1938, a grateful refugee from Nazism. He became a citizen and extolled American ideals. By 1952, though, he had become convinced that McCarthyism was a prelude to fascism, and felt compelled to emigrate again. Lies have long legs: they are ahead of their time. How Women in Media Missed the Women’s Vote | City Journal. The election of Donald Trump has shaken identity politics to its foundations. Appealing to minorities, women, and the LGBTQ population—the so-called “coalition of the ascendant”—was supposed to guarantee Democratic rule into something like perpetuity.

Yet more than one in four Hispanics apparently voted for a man who has promised to build a wall to prevent other Hispanics from coming illegally to the United States. An angry, isolated Rust Belt working class flipped the race card, placing a successful bet on its own sense of group grievance. And 53 percent of white women preferred a Mad Men-era womanizer to the would-be first woman president.

That last fact especially should be prompting a serious reckoning among Democratic political consultants and in liberal-media conference rooms. No, ironically, the problem is that women in media have spun their own cocoon. Remember: it wasn’t very long ago that journalists were scuffed-shoed beat reporters—almost all of them men. They weren’t. How Rousseau Predicted Trump. “I love the poorly educated,” Donald Trump said during a victory speech in February, and he has repeatedly taken aim at America’s élites and their “false song of globalism.”

Voters in Britain, heeding Brexit campaigners’ calls to “take back control” of a country ostensibly threatened by uncontrolled immigration, “unelected élites,” and “experts,” have reversed fifty years of European integration. Other countries across Western Europe, as well as Israel, Russia, Poland, and Hungary, seethe with demagogic assertions of ethnic, religious, and national identity. In India, Hindu supremacists have adopted Rush Limbaugh’s favorite epithet “libtard” to channel righteous fury against liberal and secular élites. Voltaire, with whom Rousseau shared a long and violent animosity, caricatured him as a “tramp who would like to see the rich robbed by the poor, the better to establish the fraternal unity of man.” Rousseau described the quintessential inner experience of modernity: being an outsider.

This is how fascism comes to America. Robert Kagan is a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and a contributing columnist for The Post. The Republican Party’s attempt to treat Donald Trump as a normal political candidate would be laughable were it not so perilous to the republic. If only he would mouth the party’s “conservative” principles, all would be well.

But of course the entire Trump phenomenon has nothing to do with policy or ideology. It has nothing to do with the Republican Party, either, except in its historic role as incubator of this singular threat to our democracy. Trump has transcended the party that produced him. His growing army of supporters no longer cares about the party. Because it did not immediately and fully embrace Trump, because a dwindling number of its political and intellectual leaders still resist him, the party is regarded with suspicion and even hostility by his followers. And the source of allegiance? [Editorial: The rank nihilism driving the GOP’s acceptance of Trump] opinions true false. Trumpology: A Master Class. The personality that looms largest over the 2016 campaign did not emerge on the political scene as an unknown. In fact, Donald Trump might be one of the most deeply studied presidential candidates ever.

Beginning in the early 1990s, as the real estate mogul dealt with corporate calamities, and until last year, when he descended the escalator at Trump Tower to announce his candidacy, a half-dozen serious biographies have been written about a man who has imprinted himself on American culture in towering gold letters.

But those biographies—which dig into Trump’s family history, his early business successes and later financial disasters, his tabloid sex scandals and the television showmanship that saved him—had largely receded into the depths of Amazon’s bestseller list. Now those books—which have not always been to Trump’s liking; he sued one of the authors unsuccessfully for libel—have become precious source material for those eager to explain Trump’s surge toward the GOP nomination. Trump’s Boswell Speaks.

Last June, as dusk fell outside Tony Schwartz’s sprawling house, on a leafy back road in Riverdale, New York, he pulled out his laptop and caught up with the day’s big news: Donald J. Trump had declared his candidacy for President. As Schwartz watched a video of the speech, he began to feel personally implicated. Trump, facing a crowd that had gathered in the lobby of Trump Tower, on Fifth Avenue, laid out his qualifications, saying, “We need a leader that wrote ‘The Art of the Deal.’ ” If that was so, Schwartz thought, then he, not Trump, should be running.

Schwartz dashed off a tweet: “Many thanks Donald Trump for suggesting I run for President, based on the fact that I wrote ‘The Art of the Deal.’ ” Schwartz had ghostwritten Trump’s 1987 breakthrough memoir, earning a joint byline on the cover, half of the book’s five-hundred-thousand-dollar advance, and half of the royalties. “I put lipstick on a pig,” he said.

Newhouse called Trump about the project, then visited him to discuss it. America | Bernie Sanders. Bernie Surges +12%, Clinton Falls -11% in Reuters LV Tracking Poll; Sanders Gains +13% With Af-Ams. Last week, slinkerwink posted this diary highlighting the Reuters tracking poll. Reuters had shown Bernie Sanders pulling even with Clinton nationally following the Iowa caucuses, much like the Quinnipiac poll that showed Clinton only up 44-42. What was the response to this from DKos commenters? It was that Clinton still led handily among likely voters. At that time, she still led 63-34 in Reuters’ "likely democratic primary voter” screen. And to be sure, Reuters is not the best pollster by any measure. Reuters’ “likely democratic primary voter” screen excludes all self-identified independents, even though self identified independents made up about 24% of the electorate in the 2008 primaries.

Even in a state with ultra-closed primaries like New York, exit polls say that self-identified Independents made up 12% of the electorate (with another 1% self-identified Republicans). That was then This is now And just for the record, registered voters have remained basically tied over the past week: President Obama turns anti-tax message on Republicans - latimes.com. Reporting from Washington — President Obama visited New Hampshire to highlight the next big fight in Washington, as he urged Congress to not "be a Grinch" by allowing tax cuts to expire after the holidays, costing the average middle-class family $1,000 in 2012. In a less-than-jolly assessment of Republican motives, Obama said Tuesday that the GOP's votes against his jobs plan this fall were essentially votes to raise taxes, because one provision of the plan would have preserved the tax breaks. "The question they'll have to answer when they get back from Thanksgiving is this," Obama said.

"Are they really willing to break their oath to never raise taxes, and raise taxes on the middle class, just to play politics? " The critique represented the start of a new campaign, begun a day after a bipartisan congressional "super committee" announced it could not agree on a 10-year plan to reduce federal deficits and called it quits a few days before its Thanksgiving deadline. "Seriously? " We are the 1%, Bitches. US Health Care. The Chorus For Immigration Reform Grows Louder. Hell Yes, Mayor Bloomberg. I’m With You. New York City Mayor Bloomberg calls for major immigration reform: The Mayor proposed green cards for graduates with advanced degrees in essential fields; a new visa for entrepreneurs with investors ready to invest capital in their job-creating idea; more temporary and permanent visas for highly skilled workers…The Mayor also announced the results of a study conducted by the Partnership for a New American Economy – a bipartisan group of business leaders and mayors from across the country – that found more than 40 percent of Fortune 500 companies were founded by immigrants or the children of immigrants and those companies employ more than 10 million people worldwide and have combined revenues of $4.2 trillion. and In the last presidential election I interviewed most of the candidates on a variety of tech issues, including immigration.

Most of the candidates punted because the issue is so politically charged. The fact is that those immigrants create companies, create jobs, create wealth. Yes We Can - Barack Obama Music Video.